Slidesteatrogrego

1.395 visualizações

Publicada em

0 comentários
0 gostaram
Estatísticas
Notas
  • Seja o primeiro a comentar

  • Seja a primeira pessoa a gostar disto

Sem downloads
Visualizações
Visualizações totais
1.395
No SlideShare
0
A partir de incorporações
0
Número de incorporações
2
Ações
Compartilhamentos
0
Downloads
49
Comentários
0
Gostaram
0
Incorporações 0
Nenhuma incorporação

Nenhuma nota no slide
  • parodos, p. 400:“. . . with the fennel / Join reverence to riot. / Soon the land will dance; For whoso leads the revel / He is always Bacchus ... / Will dance out to the mountains / Mountains where the women / Waiting in their concourse / Have raged from loom and shuttle / To rave with Bacchus.”what’s that mean? If whoevedr leads the revel is always Bacchus, who, or what, is Bacchus, which is to say, Dionysus? who, or what, wreaks a terrible vengeance upon Pentheus? [discussion]Now, we’ve already talked a lot about Dionysus and the revenge he seeks in this play – how it has troubled at least a few of us (perhaps more than a few) that he, a god, appears to behave in a petty (if violent) way, and in response to petty motivations – how, in other words, this doesn’t answer to modern notions of what god is supposed to be all about. Nor will it in many ways have fulfilled ancient notions of the divine as a principle underpinning and modeling justice and morality in the human sphere.So maybe we don’t have as good a god as we’d like in Dionysus, but what kind of god is this in the first place? What are we to make of his justice if anyone playing him in so doing actually becomes him?So maybe I should at this point be a little more up front about my assigning this play, from the end of Greek tragedy’s golden age, so early in the semester. . .First of all, I want at the very least to challenge the idea that, when we’re dealing with greek tragedy, we can afford to be simplistic about good guys and bad guys, about crime and punishment. In our play, piety operates virtually by definition as a form of “crime”; that, paradoxically, would seem to be the implication of a line like “Join reverence to riot,” literally, “Sanctify the hubristic (hubristas) fennel rods all around!” Hubris, of course, as every high-schooler knows, is stock-in-trade for tragedy. Without it, how could the mighty fall? Here, though, it paradoxically blurs the line between piety and crime.But this idea that “whoso leads the revel / He is always Bacchus” likewise blurs boundaries. Recall that the name “Bacchus” (but the Greek says Bromios) can label not just the god but the god’s worshippers; scholars point out that that is what the text means. Yet it seems to go beyond that; it seems to force us to question our usual assumptions about demarcations between, and vast distance separating, the human and the divine. It seems, in other words, to force us to rethink tragedy if all we can do no better than think of it as human beings falling prey to all the bad karma they and the forebears have been building up throughout the generations.So as we watch, and talk about, the bacchae today, let’s work on this larger project, WHAT IS TRAGEDY? Let’s see if the challenges posed by this thoroughly human god and topsy-turvy play don’t makes us think a little hardere than we might have otherwise. . . Or to quote Tiresias lecturing Pentheus, “There is no cure for madness when the cure itself is mad” (p. 409).
  • 4th episode (432)D&P. Fitting scene4th episode. ritual feminization preceding p's death. but also representing a stage in p’s “initiation” into the mysteries of dionysus. initiation itself as a kind of ritual death. p sees double. to him d seems a bull. tyrannical-masculine-aggressive p now feminized, effeminate d now hyper-masculinized. p now wants to be publically conducted through thebes. public ritual humiliation.one is tempted to ask whether that scene serves properly as comedy or tragedy. but the comic element is sort of unmistakeable. yet this is no comic relief with low characters on stage, as in shakespeare, whatever else, this has to be made to fit into the play’s tragic trajectory!4th stasimon (436)Excited song of vengeance5th episode (438)Messenger (servant on death of Pentheus)messenger speech. p's killing by bacchants. p's curiosity. d's miraculous strength as he pulls down tree. d dissappears to address thiasos from sky. women go to pelt p etc. (fail), then to uprrot tree. p, a "climbing animal," believed will spread secrets. sparagmos and near omophagia, ironically, of agave’s own son.5th stasimon (442)Short song of triumphexodos (443)Agave’s mad scenelyric dialogueCadmus’s return with PentheusLament for PentheusDeus ex machinadeus ex machina (ex tecto??). (had already begun in lost segments with establishment of cult. translator wrong in rejecting lines. Cadmus and Harmonia to become snakes, to drive chariot to barbarian land. shall lead barbarians in attack on delphi. shall die and be transported to the islands of the blest.
  • a number of recognitions:p’s delusions as dionysian clarity.agave’s eventually of p, once delusion has passed.reversals:p womanized, overthrown, killed.agave brought down by crime against her own.the family’s ruin.knowledge too late:now agave gets it: "Destroyed by ... by Dionysus ... now I understand." (1296–1297: {Αγ.} Διόνυσος ἡμᾶς ὤλεσ᾽, ἄρτι μανθάνω. | {Κα.} ὕβριν <γ᾽> ὑβρισθείς· θεὸν γὰρ οὐχ ἡγεῖσθέ νιν.) This is the theme of understanding too late.c laments his error and the mercilessness of gods. knowledge too late.Greek 1344–1349:{Κα.} Διόνυσε, λισσόμεσθά σ᾽, ἠδικήκαμεν.{Δι.} ὄψ᾽ ἐμάθεθ᾽ ἡμᾶς, ὅτε δ᾽ ἐχρῆν οὐκ ἤιδετε.{Κα.} ἐγνώκαμεν ταῦτ᾽· ἀλλ᾽ ἐπεξέρχηι λίαν.{Δι.} καὶ γὰρ πρὸς ὑμῶν θεὸς γεγὼς ὑβριζόμην.{Κα.} ὀργὰς πρέπει θεοὺς οὐχ ὁμοιοῦσθαι βροτοῖς.{Δι.} πάλαι τάδε Ζεὺς οὑμὸς ἐπένευσεν πατήρ.pity, fear, catharsis (this last the most difficult of aristotelian concepts to understand)? pity and fear. cadmus reflects on his family's collective ruin, all due to the dishonor paid semele and her child. pathetic lament for his and family's misfortune. chorus leader acknowledges cadmus' pain.
  • a number of recognitions:p’s delusions as dionysian clarity.agave’s eventually of p, once delusion has passed.reversals:p womanized, overthrown, killed.agave brought down by crime against her own.the family’s ruin.knowledge too late:now agave gets it: "Destroyed by ... by Dionysus ... now I understand." (1296–1297: {Αγ.} Διόνυσος ἡμᾶς ὤλεσ᾽, ἄρτι μανθάνω. | {Κα.} ὕβριν <γ᾽> ὑβρισθείς· θεὸν γὰρ οὐχ ἡγεῖσθέ νιν.) This is the theme of understanding too late.c laments his error and the mercilessness of gods. knowledge too late.Greek 1344–1349:{Κα.} Διόνυσε, λισσόμεσθά σ᾽, ἠδικήκαμεν.{Δι.} ὄψ᾽ ἐμάθεθ᾽ ἡμᾶς, ὅτε δ᾽ ἐχρῆν οὐκ ἤιδετε.{Κα.} ἐγνώκαμεν ταῦτ᾽· ἀλλ᾽ ἐπεξέρχηι λίαν.{Δι.} καὶ γὰρ πρὸς ὑμῶν θεὸς γεγὼς ὑβριζόμην.{Κα.} ὀργὰς πρέπει θεοὺς οὐχ ὁμοιοῦσθαι βροτοῖς.{Δι.} πάλαι τάδε Ζεὺς οὑμὸς ἐπένευσεν πατήρ.pity, fear, catharsis (this last the most difficult of aristotelian concepts to understand)? pity and fear. cadmus reflects on his family's collective ruin, all due to the dishonor paid semele and her child. pathetic lament for his and family's misfortune. chorus leader acknowledges cadmus' pain.
  • a number of recognitions:p’s delusions as dionysian clarity.agave’s eventually of p, once delusion has passed.reversals:p womanized, overthrown, killed.agave brought down by crime against her own.the family’s ruin.knowledge too late:now agave gets it: "Destroyed by ... by Dionysus ... now I understand." (1296–1297: {Αγ.} Διόνυσος ἡμᾶς ὤλεσ᾽, ἄρτι μανθάνω. | {Κα.} ὕβριν <γ᾽> ὑβρισθείς· θεὸν γὰρ οὐχ ἡγεῖσθέ νιν.) This is the theme of understanding too late.c laments his error and the mercilessness of gods. knowledge too late.Greek 1344–1349:{Κα.} Διόνυσε, λισσόμεσθά σ᾽, ἠδικήκαμεν.{Δι.} ὄψ᾽ ἐμάθεθ᾽ ἡμᾶς, ὅτε δ᾽ ἐχρῆν οὐκ ἤιδετε.{Κα.} ἐγνώκαμεν ταῦτ᾽· ἀλλ᾽ ἐπεξέρχηι λίαν.{Δι.} καὶ γὰρ πρὸς ὑμῶν θεὸς γεγὼς ὑβριζόμην.{Κα.} ὀργὰς πρέπει θεοὺς οὐχ ὁμοιοῦσθαι βροτοῖς.{Δι.} πάλαι τάδε Ζεὺς οὑμὸς ἐπένευσεν πατήρ.pity, fear, catharsis (this last the most difficult of aristotelian concepts to understand)? pity and fear. cadmus reflects on his family's collective ruin, all due to the dishonor paid semele and her child. pathetic lament for his and family's misfortune. chorus leader acknowledges cadmus' pain.
  • a number of recognitions:p’s delusions as dionysian clarity.agave’s eventually of p, once delusion has passed.reversals:p womanized, overthrown, killed.agave brought down by crime against her own.the family’s ruin.knowledge too late:now agave gets it: "Destroyed by ... by Dionysus ... now I understand." (1296–1297: {Αγ.} Διόνυσος ἡμᾶς ὤλεσ᾽, ἄρτι μανθάνω. | {Κα.} ὕβριν <γ᾽> ὑβρισθείς· θεὸν γὰρ οὐχ ἡγεῖσθέ νιν.) This is the theme of understanding too late.c laments his error and the mercilessness of gods. knowledge too late.Greek 1344–1349:{Κα.} Διόνυσε, λισσόμεσθά σ᾽, ἠδικήκαμεν.{Δι.} ὄψ᾽ ἐμάθεθ᾽ ἡμᾶς, ὅτε δ᾽ ἐχρῆν οὐκ ἤιδετε.{Κα.} ἐγνώκαμεν ταῦτ᾽· ἀλλ᾽ ἐπεξέρχηι λίαν.{Δι.} καὶ γὰρ πρὸς ὑμῶν θεὸς γεγὼς ὑβριζόμην.{Κα.} ὀργὰς πρέπει θεοὺς οὐχ ὁμοιοῦσθαι βροτοῖς.{Δι.} πάλαι τάδε Ζεὺς οὑμὸς ἐπένευσεν πατήρ.pity, fear, catharsis (this last the most difficult of aristotelian concepts to understand)? pity and fear. cadmus reflects on his family's collective ruin, all due to the dishonor paid semele and her child. pathetic lament for his and family's misfortune. chorus leader acknowledges cadmus' pain.
  • Slidesteatrogrego

    1. 1. ESTUDOS HELÊNICOSO Teatro, a Tragédia e o TragediógrafoEstudos sobre o drama grego clássico e do drama euripidiano Brian Gordon Lutalo Kibuuka www.briankibuuka.com.br
    2. 2. Programa do Curso
    3. 3. Introdução • Questões teóricas • Metodologia O Teatro • Referências Bibliográficas • Origem do Teatro e das Representações • Delimitação Teatrais • A descrição do teatro grego • Espaço de encenação e espaço cívico • As festas cívicasA Tragédia O Tragediógrafo: Eurípides• A origem da tragédia • Biografia• Descrição formal do drama trágico • Tragédias de Eurípides• Atores, diretores, coro, corifeu • Características do drama• Financiamento da apresentação euripidiano teatral• Concurso teatral• Os tragediógrafos
    4. 4. Estudos ClássicosEstudos Clássicos são estudos da Linguagem Literatura História Arte E outros aspectos do Mundo Mediterrâneo. Nosso enfoque neste curso está na investigação do teatro grego clássico.
    5. 5. O que um classicista estuda?ArqueologiaO arqueólogo que é classicista investiga as civilizações a partir dos restos deixados, para compreender sua cultura e organização social.História da ArteA arte e arquitetura grega e romana nos influenciam até hoje.• Vasos• Afrescos• EsculturasCivilização e HistóriaClassicistas usam a arqueologia, a literatura e a história para compreender a história e cultura do Mundo Antigo.FilosofiaAs raízes da filosofia Ocidental estão no estudo das obras clássicas.
    6. 6. Questões Teóricas
    7. 7. Lendo um texto trágico comodocumento: princípios metodológicosTexto Literário / Histórico Texto trágico• O texto literário/narrativo é um • Encenado preponderantemente em “paradigma da distância na festejos cívicos atenienses. comunicação” (RICOEUR, Du texte • Tragediógrafo: educador da pólis à laction, 1986, p. 114) • Liberdade para cidadãos e tragediógrafos• “a narrativa literária e a histórica • ninguém é impedido de “conhecer ou ver pressupõem uma ordenação do qualquer coisa... a não ser que isso real e a busca da coerência…” constitua uma ajuda ao inimigo” (Th. 2.39.1)• “Esta coerência fictiva depende • espaço público de educação cívica de forma de uma possibilidade de tal “que toda a pólis fosse um exemplo de construção de sentido articulada educação para a Grécia” (Th. 2.44.1) no momento da escritura do • Interferência das tragédias nas questões texto, mas que deverá ser de interesse dos cidadãos. reconstruída pelo leitor.” • Estímulo financeiro para todos (LEENHARDT & PESAVENTO, Discurso Histórico e Narrativa frequentarem o teatro (EASTERLING, The Cambridge Companion to Greek Tragedy, 1997; Literária, 1998, p. 12) GOLDHILL, ‘Civic ideology and the problem of difference’, 2000; CARTER, ‘Was Attic tragedy democratic?’, 2004)
    8. 8. Pólis-teatral e representaçãodramática• Atenas, o estado (pólis) teatral: • GEERTZ, Negara: the Theater State in Nineteenth-Century Bali. New York, 1980. • cultura de Atenas: uma cultura da performance (REHM, Greek Tragic Theatre, 1992; CSAPO, E. & SLATER, J., The Context of Ancient Drama, 1995)• Representação dramática: • está imbuída de idealidades e mentalidades • está imbuída de rupturas e continuidades • pressupõe um drama e uma audiência julgadora • apresenta “debates, contradições e questionamentos… pela abstração” (WILLIAMS, Tragédia moderna, 2002, p. 36) • está situada “entre o lugar e o não-lugar, uma localização parasitária, que vive da própria impossibilidade de se estabilizar” (MAINGUENEAU, O contexto da obra literária, 2001, p. 28). Tal lugar é artístico, mas também político.
    9. 9. O Teatro
    10. 10. Theátron – lugar de ver
    11. 11. Diázōma – “cintura”
    12. 12. Kerkís - assento
    13. 13. Prohedría – banco da frente
    14. 14. Orchḗstra – lugar da dança
    15. 15. Skenḗ - tenda Proskḗnion – frente da tendaLogeîon – região da skenḗ onde os atores falam
    16. 16. Thýrōma – porta com batenteEpískēnos – frente da tenda
    17. 17. Párodos – caminho ou entrada
    18. 18. TeatrosRéplica artística do Teatro de Dionisoteatro de Dioniso hoje Teatro de Delfos
    19. 19. Teatro de Dioniso - Atenas• Era um anfiteatro • Com capacidade para 20,000 espectadores • Localizado na acrópole
    20. 20. Layout dos teatros gregos
    21. 21. Os Festivais Teatrais
    22. 22. Os Festivais TeatraisDionisíacas Rurais As Dionisíacas Rurais eram celebradas emhonra a Dioniso Leneias nos campos. Vários démoi celebravam esta festa em diferentes datas, mas todas no mesmo ano As Leneias era festivais de Dionisíacas Urbanas agrícola verão, que durante o fim ocorriam entre As Dionisíacas Urbanas ou Grandes Dionisíacas eram um do período de janeiro e festival de primavera celebrado anualmente entre o fim de chuvas, entre fevereiro. março e o começo de abril. Dioniso era honrado como patrono dezembro e localjaneiro, poucassemanas antes das Leneias
    23. 23. Festivais/Competições• Dionisíacas • Um festival religioso de Atenas em honra a Dioniso • Por volta de 530 a.C. as tragédias passaram a ser encenadas • Por volta de 478 a.C, as comédias também passaram a ser encenadas
    24. 24. Leneias (Λήναια)• Era um festival Ateniense dedicado ao deus Dioniso• Celebrada durante o inverno, por volta do mês Gamēliṓn [Γαμθλιών, antigamente chamado de Ληναιών] (janeiro-fevereiro). Consistia, em sacrifícios e em concursos dramáticos de tragédias e de comédias• As Leneias eram limitadas aos cidadãos atenienses• Durante o festival das Leneias, eram apresentadas peças de teatro e comédias, era um empreendimento público, organizado pelos magistrados mais importantes da cidade• Os festejos terminavam em uma assembleia em que todos os cidadãos podiam participar• Na assembleia, eram avaliados: o desempenho dos organizadores e de todos os concorrentes.• O festival decorria nos moldes da prática política e democracia Ateniense.
    25. 25. Dionisíaca Rurais (τὰ κατ΄ἄγρούςΔιονύσια)• Descrita vividamente por Aristófanes em Acarnenses (247-249), gives us a vivid description of the procession• Ocorria em dezembro (Poseideṓn [Ποςειδεών], sexto mês no calendário ático)• Muitas pessoas frequentavam a festa• Era realizada uma procissão contendo • Mulheres, com flores e pão • Homens, com vinho e água • Um falo • Um bode • Panela para cozinhar o bode• A festa durava seis dias, nos quais eram feitas procissões, entoadas canções, eram feitas danças e festas
    26. 26. Dionisíacas Urbanas (τὰ ἐν άστειΔιονύσια / τὰ μεγάλα Διονύσια)• Festival urbano• Estabelecido no sexto século a.C.• Ocorria três meses depois das Dionisíacas Rurais, entre março e abril (Elaphēboliṓn [Ἐλαφθϐολιών ], nono mês do calendário ático)• O festival durava 5 dias• A festa ocorria no final do inverno, numa época frutífera• O teatro de Dioniso era democrático por natureza: todos os cidadãos eram convidados a participar do festival e até mesmo os prisioneiros eram libertos nesta ocasião• O desfile do falo terminava com a condução da efígie do “deus” até o teatro para que esse fosse celebrado.
    27. 27. Mais sobre o festival dionisíaco• Segundo a tradição, o festival foi estabelecido após a anexação de Eleutéria, uma cidade na fronteira entre a Ática e a Beócia• Os cidadãos da cidade de Eleutéria escolheram fazer parte da Ática• Os cidadãos de Eleutéria levaram a Atenas uma estátua de Dioniso, que foi inicialmente rejeitada• Dioniso puniu os atenienses com uma praga que afetou a genitália masculina, curada após a aceitação, pelos atenienes, do culto a Dioniso• A adesão ao culto a Dioniso e a cura eram recordados todos os anos pela procissão de cidadãos carregando na procissão um falo.
    28. 28. Modalidades do Drama Grego
    29. 29. Performances nos Festivais Teatrais Ditirambos Dramas Tragédias satíricos Comédias
    30. 30. DitirambosDescrição Competições entre grupos cantando ditirambos eram uma parte importante dos festivais Cada tribo apresenta dois coros: um de homens, outro de meninos, cada um sob a liderança de um chorēgós O chorēgós vencedor recebe uma estátua que seria erguida às suas próprias custas sobre um monumento público para comemorar a vitória de seu grupo
    31. 31. Drama Satírico Derivado, como a Como a tragédia, é um tragédia, do O único drama satírico jogo entre o coro e os ditirambo, e mais supérstite protagonistas. antigo que esta• Das danças mais • O drama satírico é • é Ciclope, atribuído a antigas em honra a uma espécie de Eurípides Dioniso este drama tragicomédia • O coro era composto reteve a imitação dos • “é um drama que de sátiros. sátiros diverte” (Demetrius, • Nas grandes• As suas feições finais Sobre o estilo, 169). Dionisíacas, o drama são atribuídas a satírico era a quarta Pratinas, concorrente peça de uma de Ésquilo nos tetralogia festivais
    32. 32. Comédia Quando a tragédia já A palavra "comédia" A comédia teve sua havia passado o pico originalmente primeira evolução do seu significava "Κῶμοσ artística com desenvolvimento, cantado" Epicarmo de Siracusa, floresceu na comédia qe viveu no tempo do Os primeiros comediógrafos O termo “comédia”Origem Era uma espécie de rei Hierão. ática. festa brincalhona e Ele também tem suas alegre, um carnaval. Epicarmo colocou em raízes nos festivais cena estereótipos, O coro usava como o camponês e o dionisíacos. fantasias absurdas e parasita. Encenou o Fazendo uso do riso permanecia vestido banquete suntuoso, amargo e zombaria, a sem máscaras. com atores vestidos comédia tece críticas As comédias foram de forma grotesca tanto à vida pública e inicialmente quanto à privada. Até o ano 487 a.C., as encenadas nas representações foram Leneias. feitas por amadores. Depois, a comédia se tornou uma categoria oficial dos concursos dramáticos.
    33. 33. Comédia Quando a tragédia já A palavra "comédia" A comédia teve sua havia passado o pico originalmente primeira evolução do seu significava "Κῶμοσ artística com desenvolvimento, cantado" Epicarmo de Siracusa, floresceu na comédia qe viveu no tempo do Os primeiros comediógrafos O termo “comédia”Origem Era uma espécie de rei Hierão. ática. festa brincalhona e Ele também tem suas alegre, um carnaval. Epicarmo colocou em raízes nos festivais cena estereótipos, O coro usava como o camponês e o dionisíacos. fantasias absurdas e parasita. Encenou o Fazendo uso do riso permanecia vestido banquete suntuoso, amargo e zombaria, a sem máscaras. com atores vestidos comédia tece críticas As comédias foram de forma grotesca tanto à vida pública e inicialmente quanto à privada. Até o ano 487 a.C., as encenadas nas representações foram Leneias. feitas por amadores. Depois, a comédia se tornou uma categoria oficial dos concursos dramáticos.
    34. 34. ComédiaCratino • Contemporâneo de Péricles. • Passou à posteridade como o verdadeiro fundador da comédia ática antiga. • Os poucos comentários a seu respeito mostram-lhe como crítico político, mas também como um homem simpático e jovial. • Com 90 anos, em 423, venceu Nuvens de Aristófanes no concurso trágico, a nona de suas vitórias.Eupolis • Foi o crítico mais impiedoso da situação política e dos sofistas de seu tempo. • Sua produção coincide com a de seu rival de Aristófanes, seu amigo - mas depois, ambos romperam. • Eupolis morreu na batalha naval do Helesponto.
    35. 35. AristófanesO mais brilhante dosdramaturgos cômicos Viveu entre 450 e 385 a.C.gregos do seu tempo.Ateniense, nascido aos pés O elemento vital de suada Acrópole, no demo de comédia foi a oposiçãoCidateneo, ridicularizou as vigilante à política dadeformidades e loucuras época.da vida política.
    36. 36. A tragédia
    37. 37. A origem da tragédia
    38. 38. Transição do Ditirambo para a Tragédia O líder do coro mais Os ditirambos tarde se torna o normalmente estão protagonista, comrelacionados a algum intercâmbios líricos incidente na vida de entre ele e o coro – Dionísio nasce a tragédia Os ditirambos são cantados por um coro grego de até 50 homens ou meninos dançando em formação circular
    39. 39. Téspis cantor de introdutor de um ditirambos novo estilo um cantor – várias personagens personagensCriador do Gênero diferentes Trágico (tradição) com máscaras diferentes
    40. 40. Téspis cantor de introdutor de um ditirambos novo estilo um cantor – várias personagens personagensCriador do Gênero diferentes Trágico (tradição) com máscaras diferentes
    41. 41. Na Poética de Aristóteles, temos: os ditirambos, cantos em honra do deus o ditirambo passou por uma visão teleológica Dioniso, são apontados transformações até da tragédia como o ponto de seu acabamento final partida da “evolução”Criador do Gênero Trágico Poét., IV,1449a10-20 (tradição)
    42. 42. As primeiras tragédiasTemas ObjetivoHistórias de deusese heróis Cosmovisão Explorar os problemas Recurso temático humanos Universo governado pelo destino grandeza Destino em desastre interação com a humana de tomar decisões
    43. 43. Dramaturgos Téspis • Ator e dramaturgo • 534? A.C. Ésquilo • Criador do diálogo • 515-455 a.C. Sófocles • Introdutor do terceiro ator • 495-405 a.C.Eurípides • “mais trágico dos trágicos” (Arist., Poet., 1453a29-30) • 485-406 a.C.Aristófanes • Comediógrafo • 448-380 a.C.Menandro • Principal autor da comédia nova, comédia de costumes • 342-291 a.C.
    44. 44. A preparação do drama
    45. 45. Atividades de pré-produção teatralEscrever a Verificar Entregar o Aguardar música, se o Ensaiar, poema/m até que oatendendo chorēgós ensaiar, Participar úsica aos processo às executa reescrever, do atores/me de seleçãodemandas corretame ensaiar, proagṓn mbros do dos juízesformais do nte as suas ensaiar coro chegue drama funções
    46. 46. As tragédias e os festivais: cronologia Início das Dionisíacas Eventos que Festa do elenco ocorrem antes e início da nova da apresentação produção teatral das peças Julgamento das Apresentação peças das peças
    47. 47. A teoria da tragédia
    48. 48. Definição de Tragédia: Aristóteles
    49. 49. Teoria da Tragédia: AristótelesPoética de Aristóteles • visão teleológica da tragédia • os ditirambos, cantos em honra do deus Dioniso, são apontados como o ponto de partida da “evolução” do gênero • O gênero passou por transformações até seu acabamento final (Poét., IV,1449a10- 20)Inovações: número de atores • Segundo o tratado poético, Ésquilo foi responsável pela introdução do segundo ator • Com o tempo, foi diminuindo a importância do coro • Com a introdução de personagens em cena, a tragédia passa a ter o predomínio do diálogo das personagens entre si e delas com o coroSófocles • é o responsável por colocar três atores em cena • É o responsável pela ênfase ao aspecto cênico nas peças
    50. 50. Características do drama trágicoPouca ação encenadaEnredo familiarPedagógicoEixo temático: conflito entre o indivíduo e o universoDestino trágico provocado pelo crime contra a sociedade ou contra osdeusesCastigo, com o propósito de equilibrar a balança da justiça
    51. 51. Convenções do Teatro Grego Principais Convenções Eram usadas máscaras, Recurso Devido à Os atores perucas e dramático: um intenção usando botas de salto mensageiroAs peças eram Atores eram religiosa e conjuntos alto para vem ao palco encenadas todos do sexo estilo, nenhu mínimos e aumentar e fala aodurante o dia masculino. ma violência poucos visibilidade e público sobre era mostra no adereços. adicionar as mortes e palco. formalidade à assassinatos. caracterização
    52. 52. Partes Quantitativas da Tragédia (Poét. XII, 1452b15) Coral Êxodo • párodo • estásimo Episódio Prólogo
    53. 53. Ordem narrativa da tragédia Prólogo Párodo Episódios Estásimos Êxodo entrecortamapresentação partes da os episódios • a saída dodo tema da primeira ode peça com com a coropeça cenas atuação do • com a• um ator coro diminuição (monólogo) do elemento• mais de um coral, ator (em passou a ser monólogo) a última• mais de um cena depois ator (em do último diálogo) estásimo
    54. 54. Elementos dramáticos da Tragédia Grega A tragédia grega centra-se no reverso da fortuna - peripeteía• Encena-se a queda do herói trágico e os eventos que levaram a essa queda.• Um dos propósitos principais da tragédia grega é ajudar o público a aprender alguma verdade sobre a vida.• O público experimenta uma intensificação das emoções: os espectadores veem como o herói sofre e se identificam com seus problemas.• O herói trágico passa por uma anagnórisis: a conscientização de sua condição, uma transição da ignorância ao conhecimento.• No final do drama, o público é conduzido à catarse, a purganção e purificação de suas emoções, tornando-se mais capaz de entender a vida.• A condição trágica é muitas vezes o resultado da hamartía do herói trágico, ou da falha trágica, que leva à sua queda.• Um traço comumente associado à hamartía é a hýbris (excesso, desmedida).• Poética (X, 1452a12-17)
    55. 55. Elementos dramáticos da Tragédia Grega
    56. 56. Exemplo: Édipo Rei Peça de Sófocles Recebeu o segundo prêmio no concurso trágico Mito: • Maldição contra a família dos Labdácidas (Lábdaco) • Peças: Laio, Édipo e Sete contra Tebas, Édipo Rei Laio rapta o filho do rei Pélops, Crisipo, que se mata. Pélops amaldiçoou Laio, decretando que se ele viesse a ter um filho, este seria seu assassino. Este é o enredo de Sete contra Tebas e Antígona.
    57. 57. O herói trágico de Aristóteles• Status nobre.• Imperfeito.• Livre em sua vontade e, por isso, falível.• É punido pelo seu crime, cometido geralmente por ignorância.• A queda do herói conduze-o ao autoconhecimento.• A audiência ficava emocionalmente devastada com o descenso do herói. Uma das funções da tragédia é gerar, através disso, piedade e temor.
    58. 58. As três unidades de Aristóteles• Para infundir intensidade dramática, as tragédias contem, segundo Aristóteles, três unidades:• Unidade de tempo • toda a ação ocorre em um dia, e o coro dá as informações de background.• Unidade de lugar • Toda a ação ocorre em um só lugar• Unidade de assunto • A caracterização é singular, não havendo interpolação de narrativas ou subenredos.• Poética, VI, 1450a4
    59. 59. Atores e coro trágicos
    60. 60. Atores trágicos protagonistaContratados Concedidos e pagos aos poetas Três atores deuteragonistapelo Estado trágicos tritagonista
    61. 61. Os atores trágicos
    62. 62. Atores Trágicos• O protagonista • assumiu o papel do personagem mais importante na peça• Deuteragonista e tritagonista • desempenhavam um papel menor• Nunca há mais de três atores falando na mesma cena• Todos os três atores desempenhavam múltiplos papéis
    63. 63. Atores Trágicos• Os atores do sexo masculino interpretavam papéis femininos• A encenação de papéis múltiplos, tanto masculinos quanto femininos, era possível devido ao uso de máscaras• Máscaras com variações sutis também ajudavam a audiência a identificar o sexo, a idade e a posição social dos personagens• As principais funções de um ator eram • falar o diálogo atribuído para os seus personagens • cantar sozinho canções • cantar com o coro ou com outros atores
    64. 64. O coro
    65. 65. O coro Os membros do coro Coro e atores não eram profissionais• A tragédia continha • Aqueles que tinham músicas cantadas talento para cantar tanto por atores e dançar eram quanto pelo coro treinados pelo• O coro fazia poeta ou pelo movimentos e diretor de cena danças • Os membros do coro vestiam fantasias e máscaras
    66. 66. O coro• A primeira função de um coro trágico era a de entoar um canto de entrada chamado de párodo• Os membros do coro entoavam o párodo enquanto marchavam para a orquestra• Quando o coro estava posicionado na orquestra, ele assumia duas funções: • diálogo com os personagens através de seu líder, o Corifeu • cantar e dançar canções corais chamadas stásimai
    67. 67. O coro trágico• Era composto por 15-20 homens• O coro representava os cidadãos – sua dicção é índice não só da voz do dramaturgo, mas direciona a recepção do drama
    68. 68. As funções do coro trágico• Definir o tom das ações• Dar informações• Recordar eventos do passado• Interpretar e resumir os eventos encenados• Fazer perguntas• Emitir opiniões• Dar conselhos, se solicitado• É objetivo no julgamento das ações do protagonista• O coro age como um júri de anciãos ou homens sábios• Geralmente, as conclusões do coro são moralistas
    69. 69. As canções entoadas pelo coro• A música coral é • altamente formal e estilizada • aumentava a emoção no decorrer do seu desempenho• Partes: • Estrofe: a primeira parte de uma ode coral, durante o qual o Coro desloca-se da esquerda para a direita, ou de leste a oeste • Antístrofe: a parte de uma ode coral que segue a estrofe e durante o qual o Coro executa passos em seu retorno da direita para a esquerda ou do leste para o oeste.• EPODOS • É a terceira parte de uma ode coral, após a estrofe e o antístrofe • Completa os movimentos do coro.• Muitas vezes, um personagem no palco (ou personagens no palco) vai/vão dialogar com o Coro.• O nome da música entoada no diálogo é kômmos.
    70. 70. Ésquilo, Eurípides e Sófocles:os três principais dramaturgos trágicos
    71. 71. Ésquilo• 525 a.C./524 a.C - 456 a.C /455 a.C.• Considerado o pai da tragédia• Expandiu o número de atores para permitir conflito entre eles• 7 de 92 peças são supérstites• Seu drama foi influenciado pela invasão persa da Grécia• Foi importante no tempo da guerra: sua lápide faz menção à vitória grega em Maratona
    72. 72. Ésquilo • Culpa e punição foram os temas mais frequentes • Obras mais conhecidas: Prometeu Acorrentado e Oresteia • 13 vezes ganhador da Cidade Dionísia
    73. 73. Sófocles• Escreveu 120 peças - 7 sobreviveram• Competiu em cerca de 30 vezes e venceu 24 concursos trágicos• Ésquilo só ganhou 14 e foi derrotado, por vezes, por Sófocles• Sófocles influenciou o drama como o conhecemos pela adição de um terceiro ator• Com Sófocles, o coro tornou-se menos importante• A caracterização em Sófocles é mais desenvolvida
    74. 74. Sófocles • Temas • Homem Ideal - religioso • Amor, harmonia e paz • Respeito pela democracia • Simpatia com as fraquezas humanas
    75. 75. EurípidesUm tipo diferente de tragédia?
    76. 76. Eurípides • 480 a.C.-406 a.C. 18-19 de suas peças sobreviveram • Tragédia reformulado - introduziu personagens fortes e mulheres/escravos inteligentes • Satiriza os heróis da mitologia grega • Suas peças pareciam modernas • Centrou-se na vida interior e nos motivos patéticos • Só ganhou quatro competições
    77. 77. Hécuba de Eurípides  Histórico da Pesquisa – Metodologia – Conceitos
    78. 78. Histórico da Metodologia Conceitos Pesquisa• 2009 - Tradução e estudo • Tradução do corpus • Trágico do prólogo • Análise das imagens • Párodo• 2010 - Tradução e estudo políticas • Tragédia e Política do párodo • Imagem Política na tragédia• 2011 – Tradução da tragédia inteira
    79. 79. Conceitos Trágico – Párodo – Tragédia e Política – Imagem Política
    80. 80. Análise das Imagens Políticas 
    81. 81. Hécuba 107- ἐν γὰρ Ἀχαιῶν πλιρει ξυνόδῳ λζγεται δόξαι ςὴν παῖδ᾽ Ἀχιλεῖ108 “Pois, na assembleia plena dos aqueus, diz-se que foi decretado tornar”Hécuba πολλῆσ δ᾽ ἔριδοσ ςυνζπαιςε κλφδων, δόξα δ᾽ ἐχώρει δίχ᾽ ἀν᾽ Ἑλλινων116-118 “Uma onda de grande querela chocou-se simultaneamente, e uma dupla opinião avançava sobre o exército”
    82. 82. Hécuba 123- τὼ Θθςείδα δ᾽, ὄηω Ἀκθνῶν, διςςῶν μφκων ῥιτορεσ ἦςαν:125 “dois rebentos de Atenas, eram oradores de duplos discursos, mas concordavam em uma única proposição,”Hécuba ςπουδαὶ δὲ λόγων κατατεινομζνων ἦςαν ἴςαι πωσ, πρὶν ὁ ποικιλόφρων130-134 κόπισ ἡδυλόγοσ θμοχαριςτὴσ Λαερτιάδθσ πείκει ςτρατιὰν μὴ τὸν ἄριςτον Δαναῶν πάντων“ eram, de certa maneira, semelhantes, depois que o astuto mentiroso de fala doce que agrada o povo, o Filho de Laerte, persuade o exército”
    83. 83. BAILLY, A. Dictionnaire Grec Français. Éd. revue par L. Séchan et P. Chantraine. Paris: Hachette, 26e éd., 1963. EASTERLING, E. A. Form and Performance. In: EASTERLING, E. A. TheCambridge Companion to Greek Tragedy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997 (2005). p. 151-177.FINLEY. Moses. (org) Mito memória e História. In: Uso e abuso da História. São Paulo: Martins Fontes, 1989. p. 06. GOODWIN, W.W. A Greek Grammar. London: MacMillan, 1894. GREGORY, Justina. Hecuba: introduction, text, and commentary. Atlanta: American Philological Association, 1999. PAGE, T. E.; CAPPS, D. E.; ROSE, W. H. D. (eds.). Euripides. v. III. New York: Putnam Son’s, 1929.GRUBE, G. M. A. The Drama of Euripides. Londres: Methuen & Co., 1941. p. 68-69.
    84. 84. GRUBE, G. M. A. The Drama of Euripides. Londres: Methuen & Co., 1941. p. 68- 69. HORTA, G.N.B.P. Os gregos e seu idioma, 2 v. Rio de Janeiro: Di Giorgio, 1983 (1º tomo, 3ª ed.) e 1979 (2º tomo).LIDDEL, H.G. & SCOTT, R. A Greek-English Lexicon Revised and augmented by H.S. Jones and R. McKenzie. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1940. MAINGUENEAU, D. O contexto da obra literária. São Paulo: Martins Fontes, 2001. p. 28. SANTOS, Fernando Brandão dos. Alceste, de Eurípides: o prólogo (1-76). Humanitas, v. LX, 2008. p.92. SEGAL, C. “O ouvinte e o espectador”. IN: VERNANT, J-P. O Homem Grego. Lisboa: Presença, 1994. p. 195.SOMMESTEIN, Greek Drama and Dramatists. New York: Routledge, 2002. p. 6-7.VERNANT, J-P. Mito e tragédia na Grécia Antiga. São Paulo: Perspectiva, 1999. p. 10.

    ×