Modelo cascata apresentação

47.723 visualizações

Publicada em

Publicada em: Tecnologia
1 comentário
3 gostaram
Estatísticas
Notas
Sem downloads
Visualizações
Visualizações totais
47.723
No SlideShare
0
A partir de incorporações
0
Número de incorporações
27.397
Ações
Compartilhamentos
0
Downloads
390
Comentários
1
Gostaram
3
Incorporações 0
Nenhuma incorporação

Nenhuma nota no slide
  • Primeira Revolução Industrial the mechanization of manufacturing changed an agrarian into an urban industrial society The cotton textile industry was the first to be fully mechanized. The crucial inventions were John KAY's flying shuttle (invented in 1733 but not widely used until the 1760s), James HARGREAVES's spinning jenny (1765), Richard ARKWRIGHT's water frame (1769), Samuel CROMPTON's mule (1779), and Edmund CARTWRIGHT's machine LOOM (1785, but delayed in its general use). n 1709 the ironmaster Abraham DARBY I succeeded in producing sound cast iron in a blast furnace charged with iron ore and coal (and soon afterward with coke, derived from coal). In 1712 another Englishman engaged in the iron trade, Thomas NEWCOMEN, invented the STEAM ENGINE The first factories were driven by water, but James WATT's improved Newcomen STEAM ENGINE (1769; especially his "sun and planet" adaptation converting linear into circular motion) made steam-driven machinery and modern factories possible from the 1780s. This use of steam power led, in turn, to increased demand for coal and iron. Each development spawned new technological breakthroughs, as, for example, Sir Henry BESSEMER's process for making steel (1856). Other industries such as chemicals and mining and the engineering professions also developed rapidly Segunda Revolução Industrial From 1830 on, the development of steam-driven LOCOMOTIVES brought the advent of RAILROADS, extending the transportation network In the 20th century the United States also dominated the new automobile industry, which Henry Ford (see FORD family) revolutionized by introducing a system of coordinated ASSEMBLY-LINE operations. Ford's success led to the widespread adoption of MASS PRODUCTION techniques in industry If the engineer was instrumental in making the Industrial Revolution, it can equally be said that the Industrial Revolution gave rise to the ENGINEERING profession as it is recognized today. Where previously engineers had risen through the ranks of craftsmen, in the 18th century it was becoming apparent that the act of design could be codified in the form of technical training, and the military services began to seek such training for their officer corps. In the 1740s the British government established a military academy at Woolwich at which cadets were instructed in the application of elementary mathematics and statics to gunnery and the design of fortifications. Later in the century John SMEATON coined the term "civil engineer" to distinguish civilian engineers from the increasing number of military engineers being graduated from Woolwich. A short-lived fraternity that called itself the Society of Civil Engineers (the "Smeatonians") formed around Smeaton; the first true professional organization in the field of engineering, however, was the Institution of Civil Engineers, founded in London in 1818 Experiments with the INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE began early in the century but without success until Jean Joseph Etienne LENOIR built an operational if inefficient two-cycle engine (1860) and the first AUTOMOBILE with this type of engine in 1862. The critical breakthrough in designing an efficient internal-combustion engine came in 1876, when Nikolaus August OTTO marketed the "Silent Otto" gas engine, having four cycles: intake, compression, stroke, and exhaust. In the 1880s the engine was adopted by Karl BENZ and Gottlieb DAIMLER to power motor vehicles. Rudolf DIESEL's engine, in which combustion is produced by high pressure in the cylinder, was exhibited in 1897. INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION, which began in Great Britain in the 18th century, spread to the rest of western Europe and North America during the 19th century. The pattern of diffusion was quite uniform, beginning with textiles, coal, and iron. In textiles such improvements as the Jacquard LOOM (France, 1801) were developed, which allowed fabrics with woven patterns to be produced cheaply. The SEWING MACHINE was invented (1846) in the United States by Elias HOWE and mass-marketed (1851) by Isaac Merrit SINGER. Iron was the basic metal of industry until after the discovery by Henry BESSEMER (British patent, 1856) and William Kelly (U.S. patent, 1847) of a process for making large amounts of steel cheaply (see IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY). The superior Siemens-Martin open-hearth process for making high-quality steel was first demonstrated in France in 1863
  • Primeira Revolução Industrial the mechanization of manufacturing changed an agrarian into an urban industrial society The cotton textile industry was the first to be fully mechanized. The crucial inventions were John KAY's flying shuttle (invented in 1733 but not widely used until the 1760s), James HARGREAVES's spinning jenny (1765), Richard ARKWRIGHT's water frame (1769), Samuel CROMPTON's mule (1779), and Edmund CARTWRIGHT's machine LOOM (1785, but delayed in its general use). n 1709 the ironmaster Abraham DARBY I succeeded in producing sound cast iron in a blast furnace charged with iron ore and coal (and soon afterward with coke, derived from coal). In 1712 another Englishman engaged in the iron trade, Thomas NEWCOMEN, invented the STEAM ENGINE The first factories were driven by water, but James WATT's improved Newcomen STEAM ENGINE (1769; especially his "sun and planet" adaptation converting linear into circular motion) made steam-driven machinery and modern factories possible from the 1780s. This use of steam power led, in turn, to increased demand for coal and iron. Each development spawned new technological breakthroughs, as, for example, Sir Henry BESSEMER's process for making steel (1856). Other industries such as chemicals and mining and the engineering professions also developed rapidly Segunda Revolução Industrial From 1830 on, the development of steam-driven LOCOMOTIVES brought the advent of RAILROADS, extending the transportation network In the 20th century the United States also dominated the new automobile industry, which Henry Ford (see FORD family) revolutionized by introducing a system of coordinated ASSEMBLY-LINE operations. Ford's success led to the widespread adoption of MASS PRODUCTION techniques in industry If the engineer was instrumental in making the Industrial Revolution, it can equally be said that the Industrial Revolution gave rise to the ENGINEERING profession as it is recognized today. Where previously engineers had risen through the ranks of craftsmen, in the 18th century it was becoming apparent that the act of design could be codified in the form of technical training, and the military services began to seek such training for their officer corps. In the 1740s the British government established a military academy at Woolwich at which cadets were instructed in the application of elementary mathematics and statics to gunnery and the design of fortifications. Later in the century John SMEATON coined the term "civil engineer" to distinguish civilian engineers from the increasing number of military engineers being graduated from Woolwich. A short-lived fraternity that called itself the Society of Civil Engineers (the "Smeatonians") formed around Smeaton; the first true professional organization in the field of engineering, however, was the Institution of Civil Engineers, founded in London in 1818 Experiments with the INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE began early in the century but without success until Jean Joseph Etienne LENOIR built an operational if inefficient two-cycle engine (1860) and the first AUTOMOBILE with this type of engine in 1862. The critical breakthrough in designing an efficient internal-combustion engine came in 1876, when Nikolaus August OTTO marketed the "Silent Otto" gas engine, having four cycles: intake, compression, stroke, and exhaust. In the 1880s the engine was adopted by Karl BENZ and Gottlieb DAIMLER to power motor vehicles. Rudolf DIESEL's engine, in which combustion is produced by high pressure in the cylinder, was exhibited in 1897. INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION, which began in Great Britain in the 18th century, spread to the rest of western Europe and North America during the 19th century. The pattern of diffusion was quite uniform, beginning with textiles, coal, and iron. In textiles such improvements as the Jacquard LOOM (France, 1801) were developed, which allowed fabrics with woven patterns to be produced cheaply. The SEWING MACHINE was invented (1846) in the United States by Elias HOWE and mass-marketed (1851) by Isaac Merrit SINGER. Iron was the basic metal of industry until after the discovery by Henry BESSEMER (British patent, 1856) and William Kelly (U.S. patent, 1847) of a process for making large amounts of steel cheaply (see IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY). The superior Siemens-Martin open-hearth process for making high-quality steel was first demonstrated in France in 1863
  • Modelo cascata apresentação

    1. 1. Engenharia de Software Modelo Cascata Antonio Carlos Almir Ramos Eryson Raphael Rafael G. Leitão
    2. 2. O Modelo Cascata <ul><li>O modelo cascata (waterfall) tornou-se conhecido na década de 70 e é referenciado na maioria dos livros de engenharia de software ou manuais de padrões de software. Nele as atividades do processo de desenvolvimento são estruturadas numa cascata onde a saída de uma é a entrada para a próxima. As suas principais atividades são: </li></ul>
    3. 3. O Modelo Cascata <ul><li>Estudo de viabilidade </li></ul><ul><li>Análise e especificação de requisitos </li></ul><ul><li>Design da arquitetura </li></ul><ul><li>Design detalhado </li></ul><ul><li>Codificação e testes de unidades </li></ul><ul><li>Integração e teste do sistema </li></ul><ul><li>Entrega e instalação </li></ul><ul><li>Manutenção </li></ul>
    4. 4. O Modelo Cascata <ul><li>Existem muitas variantes deste modelo propostas por diferentes pesquisadores ou empresas de desenvolvimento e adaptadas a diferentes tipos de software. A característica comum é um fluxo linear e seqüencial de atividades semelhantes a descritas anteriormente. </li></ul><ul><li>Este modelo, quando proposto, introduziu importantes qualidades ao desenvolvimento. A primeira chama a atenção de que o processo de desenvolvimento deve ser conduzido de forma disciplinada, com atividades claramente definidas, determinada a partir de um planejamento e sujeitas a gerenciamento durante a realização. </li></ul>
    5. 5. O Modelo Cascata <ul><li>Outra qualidade define de maneira clara quais são estas atividades e quais os requisitos para desempenhá-las. Por fim, o modelo introduz a separação das atividades da definição e design da atividade de programação que era o centro das atenções no desenvolvimento de software. </li></ul><ul><li>O modelo Cascata também é criticado por ser linear, rígido e monolítico. Inspirados em modelos de outras atividades de engenharia, este modelo argumenta que cada atividade apenas deve ser iniciada quando a outra estiver terminada e verificada. Ele é considerado monolítico por não introduzir a participação de clientes e usuário durante as atividades do desenvolvimento, mas apenas o software ter sido implementado e entregue. Não existe como o cliente verificar antecipadamente qual o produto final para detectar eventuais problemas. </li></ul>
    6. 6. O Modelo Cascata <ul><li>Características particulares do software (ser conceitual, por exemplo) e a falta de modelos teóricos, técnicas e ferramentas adequadas mostram que é necessário haver maior flexibilidade neste fluxo seqüencial, permitindo volta atrás para eventuais modificações. Veremos mais adiante modelos que propõem maior flexibilidade no fluxo de execução. </li></ul><ul><li>As métricas utilizadas nas estimativas de prazos e recursos humanos são ainda bastante imprecisas e quase sempre o planejamento de atividades precisa ser revisto. Normalmente, os prazos não são cumpridos, pois o planejamento, neste modelo, é feito unicamente nas etapas iniciais do desenvolvimento. A estrutura seqüencial e rígida também não permite que o planejamento seja refeito para corrigir falhas nas atividades de desenvolvimento. </li></ul>
    7. 7. O Modelo Cascata
    8. 9. Vantagens <ul><li>Torna o processo de desenvolvimento estruturado; </li></ul><ul><li>Tem uma ordem sequencial de fases; </li></ul><ul><li>Cada fase cai em cascata na próxima e cada fase deve estar terminada antes do início da seguinte; </li></ul><ul><li>Todas as atividades identificadas nas fases do modelo são fundamentais e estão na ordem certa; </li></ul><ul><li>Esta abordagem é atualmente a norma e provavelmente permanecerá como tal nos próximos tempos; </li></ul>
    9. 10. Desvantagens <ul><li>Não fornece feedback entre as fases e não permite a atualização ou redefinição das fases anteriores; </li></ul><ul><li>Não suporta modificações nos requisitos; </li></ul><ul><li>Não prevê a manutenção; </li></ul><ul><li>Não permite a reutilização; </li></ul><ul><li>É excessivamente sincronizado; </li></ul><ul><li>Se ocorrer um atraso todo o processo é afetado; </li></ul><ul><li>Faz aparecer o software muito tarde; </li></ul>
    10. 11. Problemas <ul><li>O ciclo de vida Cascata é o paradigma mais visto e mais amplamente empregado na engenharia de software, porém sua aplicabilidade, em muitos campos, tem sido questionada. </li></ul><ul><li>Entre os problemas que surgem quando se aplica o modelo são: </li></ul><ul><li>Na realidade, os projetos raramente seguem o fluxo sequencial </li></ul><ul><li>que o modelo propõe; </li></ul><ul><li>A interação é sempre necessária e está presente, criando </li></ul><ul><li>problemas na aplicação do modelo; </li></ul><ul><li>Em princípio, é difícil para o cliente especificar os requisitos </li></ul><ul><li>explicitamente, o que acarreta a incerteza natural do início de </li></ul><ul><li>qualquer projeto; </li></ul><ul><li>O cliente deve ser paciente, pois uma versão funcional não </li></ul><ul><li>estará disponível até o final do desenvolvimento. Qualquer erro </li></ul><ul><li>ou mal entendido, se não for detectado até que o software seja </li></ul><ul><li>revisado, pode ser desastroso; </li></ul>
    11. 12. Problemas <ul><li>Apesar desses problemas, o modelo Cascata tem um lugar bem definido e importante nos trabalhos de engenharia de software. Ele fornece um padrão do qual se encaixam métodos para a análise, projeto, codificação e manutenção. </li></ul>
    12. 13. Domínio de aplicações <ul><li>O modelo Cascata aplica-se bem em situações em que o software </li></ul><ul><li>a ser desenvolvido é simples, os requisitos são bem conhecidos, a </li></ul><ul><li>tecnologia de Programação. Melhorias e correções podem ser </li></ul><ul><li>consideradas como parte do desenvolvimento. </li></ul><ul><li>As etapas descritas são as principais, porém existem sub-etapas </li></ul><ul><li>dentro de cada etapa, as quais diferem muito de um projeto para </li></ul><ul><li>outro. Também é possível que certos projetos de software exijam a </li></ul><ul><li>incorporação de uma etapa extra ou a separação de uma etapa em </li></ul><ul><li>outras etapas. Com certeza, todas essas variações do modelo </li></ul><ul><li>Cascata possuem o mesmo conceito básico: a ideia de que uma etapa </li></ul><ul><li>fornece saída que serão usadas como entradas para a etapa </li></ul><ul><li>seguinte. </li></ul>
    13. 14. Domínio de aplicações <ul><li>Portanto, o processo de desenvolvimento de um produto </li></ul><ul><li>de software de acordo com o modelo Cascata é simples de conhecer </li></ul><ul><li>e controlar. Outras atividades que também são levadas em </li></ul><ul><li>consideração em cada uma das etapas de desenvolvimento do </li></ul><ul><li>software são: </li></ul><ul><li>Verificação; </li></ul><ul><li>Administração das etapas serem documentadas. </li></ul><ul><li>A verificação, por sua vez, é necessária para que </li></ul><ul><li>uma etapa forneça os dados corretos para a etapa seguinte. Já a </li></ul><ul><li>administração, efetua a gestão e o controle da etapa. </li></ul>

    ×