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Responding to Academically Distressed Students

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Need some help on how to deal with your students who fall short in academics? Find help in this presentation. This guides the faculty or the counselor on how to help the students make the most of their life in school

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Responding to Academically Distressed Students

  1. Mr. Ronald M. Quileste, M.Ed School of Education, Xavier University
  2. What is the problem?
  3. students often experience high levels of stress
  4. students often experience highlevels of stress Most students successfully cope with university life; however, some become overwhelmed
  5. students often experience highlevels of stress Most students successfully cope with university life; however, some become overwhelmed A significant number of college students have their education and personal lives disrupted by psychological problems
  6. Whenpsychological difficultiesgo untreated,theresults canbeseriousand includeacademicfailure andevenwithdrawal fromtheuniversity
  7. Faculty and staff play a key role in identifying and responding to distressed students
  8. As a faculty or staff member you often get the first glimpse of students in trouble and may be the first person who students turn to for help
  9. Responding to Student Academic Problems The Failing Student Academic Dismissal Writing Anxiety Learning Skills Math Anxiety Exam Anxiety Procrastination
  10. Responding to Student Academic Problems The Failing Student Academic Dismissal Writing Anxiety Learning Skills Math Anxiety Exam Anxiety Procrastination
  11. THE FAILING STUDENT
  12. The student may come to class late or often may be absent
  13. The student usually does not understand the course content
  14. The student may be unaware of campus resources to combat the problem
  15. Negative thinking and behavior may be evident early in the course
  16. The student might lack preparation or interest in the course
  17. The student may not be able to balance work, social activities and academic study hours
  18. What Can You Do?
  19. Encourage the student to make a private appointment
  20. Review the student’s performance in the course
  21. Make suggestions for improvement
  22. Refer the student to a learning assistance service of the College or School
  23. Refer the student to a counselor for personal/social counseling and educational/vocational counseling
  24. What do you avoid?
  25. Concluding that the student is just lazy
  26. Waiting to connect with the student
  27. Presuming the student lacks the ability to be successful.
  28. Discouraging the student who really does have the time to improve
  29. Responding to Student Academic Problems The Failing Student Academic Dismissal Writing Anxiety Learning Skills Math Anxiety Exam Anxiety Procrastination
  30. Responding to Student Academic Problems The Failing Student Academic Dismissal Writing Anxiety Learning Skills Math Anxiety Exam Anxiety Procrastination
  31. The Academically Dismissed Student
  32. Problems leading to academic dismissal often include the following: wrong major
  33. Problems leading to academic dismissal often include the following: financial difficulties
  34. Problems leading to academic dismissal often include the following: too many outside work hours
  35. Problems leading to academic dismissal often include the following: an accident
  36. Problems leading to academic dismissal often include the following: illness of student or family members
  37. Problems leading to academic dismissal often include the following: theneed forimprovedstudyskills, especiallytime management
  38. Problems leading to academic dismissal often include the following: failure to use campus resources
  39. What Can You Do?
  40. Talk with the student in private
  41. Listen to the student’s concerns
  42. Remind the student that current academic requirements and policies are listed in the Schedule of Classes, in the university catalog, and or the school / university’s website
  43. Have the student explain the main reasons for the dismissal
  44. Ask the student if he/she has seen an academic advisor
  45. Refer the student to an academic advisor to develop a two-semester corrective plan
  46. What do you avoid?
  47. Overwhelming the student with too much information
  48. Assuming the student can work through the problems without developing a network of support on campus
  49. Discouraging the student from applying for reinstatement
  50. Reaching the conclusion that the student will not be reinstated
  51. Responding to Student Academic Problems The Failing Student Academic Dismissal Writing Anxiety Learning Skills Math Anxiety Exam Anxiety Procrastination
  52. Responding to Student Academic Problems The Failing Student Academic Dismissal Writing Anxiety Learning Skills Math Anxiety Exam Anxiety Procrastination
  53. Anxiety may result in assignments being late or not turned in at all
  54. A history of incompletes may be a sign of writing anxiety
  55. Often the student is emotional when discussing his/her writing
  56. A failure to understand the assignment
  57. The lack of pre-writing techniques for starting the assignment
  58. Lack of general time management skills
  59. Procrastination
  60. Poor Organization Skills
  61. Problems With Grammar
  62. Poor grades on writing assignments in the past
  63. A learning disability
  64. What Can You Do?
  65. Have a private appointment with the student
  66. Listen carefully to the student’s explanation of the problem
  67. Look for patterns and repetition of the problem behavior
  68. Refer the student to a writing counselor
  69. Refer the student to the Writing Center of the English Department
  70. Refer the student who speaks about a learning disability to the Disability Support Service of the school’s Counseling Center
  71. Refer the student to the Counseling Center for psychological counseling, if needed
  72. What do you avoid?
  73. Concluding that the student is only trying to obtain extra time for the assignment
  74. Assuming the student can simply control the behavior by him/herself
  75. Responding to Student Academic Problems The Failing Student Academic Dismissal Writing Anxiety Learning Skills Math Anxiety Exam Anxiety Procrastination
  76. Responding to Student Academic Problems The Failing Student Academic Dismissal Writing Anxiety Learning Skills Math Anxiety Exam Anxiety Procrastination
  77. A student may not have been taught specific learning skills prior to coming to college
  78. Good time management can promote academic success
  79. Paper and pencil techniques (e.g., “to do” lists, schedules, and calendars) can help students analyze and organize their time
  80. Notes and text material can promote learning (e.g., making marginal notes, giving visual emphasis to material, scheduling frequent reviews, etc.)
  81. A student can plan effective study strategies, based on his/her learning style
  82. Sometimes a student’s learning style does not match the teaching style of the instructor
  83. Learning skills and strategies vary, according to the specific nature and content of the course
  84. What Can You Do?
  85. Ask the student about his/her personal study time and study strategies
  86. Determine if the student understands the course content
  87. Provide clarification of course content, if needed
  88. Build into your class a session on how to study for the course at the beginning of the semester
  89. Take time to review past exams to analyze the student’s strengths and weaknesses
  90. Make suggestions and encourage the student to adjust learning strategies before the next test
  91. Ask if the student is utilizing any other campus resources
  92. Stress the value of group study
  93. Refer the student to the course’s Guided Study Sessions for support (if the course provides this option for strengthening study skills)
  94. What do you avoid?
  95. Assuming the student does not understand the course material
  96. Believing the student should know how to learn course content
  97. Thinking the student knows about available campus resources
  98. Responding to Student Academic Problems The Failing Student Academic Dismissal Writing Anxiety Learning Skills Math Anxiety Exam Anxiety Procrastination
  99. Responding to Student Academic Problems The Failing Student Academic Dismissal Writing Anxiety Learning Skills Math Anxiety Exam Anxiety Procrastination
  100. The student with MATH ANXIETY
  101. Students can experience math anxiety in any class that has quantitative activities
  102. Math anxiety can be caused by the following factors: 1. poor math teaching; 2. cultural expectations (e.g., Only men excel in math) 3. not being developmentally ready for certain math concepts 4. having a math learning disability, and 5. the sequential nature of math.
  103. Most individuals who admit to having math anxiety do not show symptoms of anxiety disorders in other areas of their lives
  104. However, a high degree of math anxiety can affect a person’s inability to perform in non- math related situations
  105. Math anxiety can be successfully addressed, using both psychological and learning strategies coupled with appropriate math placement
  106. Symptoms of math anxiety !
  107. 1 rapid heartbeat
  108. 2 sweaty palms
  109. 3 feelings of inadequacy
  110. 4 negative self-talk
  111. 5 an inability to retain information in a test situation
  112. What Can You Do?
  113. Let the student talk about his/her experiences with math: when the anxiety first began, what kind of negative reactions existed, etc.
  114. Be supportive of the student and ask the student about his/her goals and what math course is needed to fulfill those goals
  115. Be sure the student has the proper background for the present math course
  116. Recommend some study strategies (e.g., note cards, time management, paper-and pencil techniques) to help the student begin to take control of the learning process or some accommodations, such as extended time for an assignment
  117. What do you avoid?
  118. Minimizing the situation
  119. Expecting the anxiety to just go away
  120. Assuming the student is just lazy and not working
  121. Telling the student to put more time into the course without any intervention
  122. Responding to Student Academic Problems The Failing Student Academic Dismissal Writing Anxiety Learning Skills Math Anxiety Exam Anxiety Procrastination
  123. Responding to Student Academic Problems The Failing Student Academic Dismissal Writing Anxiety Learning Skills Math Anxiety Exam Anxiety Procrastination
  124. The student with EXAM ANXIETY
  125. Some anxiety often helps a student perform better under pressure. However, if students experience too much anxiety, it can affect both academic and psychological well-being
  126. Test anxiety can be caused by many factors, such as the pressure to succeed, past experiences, and/or fear of failure
  127. Symptoms of test anxiety !
  128. 1 rapid heartbeat
  129. 2 sweaty palms
  130. 3 negative self-talk
  131. 3 feelings of inadequacy
  132. 5 tears
  133. 6 inability to retain test information
  134. The student with anxiety may not perform well on tests, although grades on other course requirements are good
  135. A student can have anxiety related to certain types of exams
  136. Astudentcanhaveanxietyrelatedtocertaintypesofexams For example, there may be a great discrepancy between a student’s grades in multiple-choice and essay exams in the same course
  137. What Can You Do?
  138. See the student privately
  139. Ask about the student’s exam preparation and time management skills
  140. Suggest useful study strategies and exam preparation techniques
  141. Go over the exam with the student so that the student understands his/her performance and what caused the errors
  142. Encourage the student to form a study group for the course to provide academic and psychological support
  143. Recommend tutoring if the student does not understand the course material
  144. What do you avoid?
  145. Minimizing the situation
  146. Assuming the student is simply trying to ask for special attention
  147. Thinking the student should be able to handle the problem without support
  148. Concluding that the student must have a learning disability
  149. Believing that if the student really understands the material, the student should be able to perform better on exams
  150. Responding to Student Academic Problems The Failing Student Academic Dismissal Writing Anxiety Learning Skills Math Anxiety Exam Anxiety Procrastination
  151. Responding to Student Academic Problems The Failing Student Academic Dismissal Writing Anxiety Learning Skills Math Anxiety Exam Anxiety Procrastination
  152. The Student Who Procrastinates
  153. Procrastination is putting off something that is in the student’s best interests to do, or doing less important things first
  154. Avoidance of important work can lead to stress, depression, shame, and guilt which, in turn, can cause the student to avoid the same tasks in the future
  155. While some students procrastinate because a given task is aversive, there is usually an emotional cause at the root of serious procrastination
  156. What Can You Do?
  157. See the student privately
  158. Help the student assess time management skills
  159. Help the student set specific and realistic goals
  160. Help the student set specific and realistic goals Procrastinators often cannot see the trees for the forest!
  161. Be clear with deadlines, limits, and consequences
  162. Identify how procrastination hurts the student and use his/her suffering as a motivator for change
  163. Identifyhowprocrastinationhurtsthestudentandusehis/hersufferingasa motivatorforchange Procrastinators will not seek help unless they are suffering from the procrastination
  164. Recognize that there are often strong emotions underlying procrastination, such as guilt, fear, anger, depression, panic, and shame
  165. Recognizethatthereareoftenstrongemotionsunderlyingprocrastination,such asguilt,fear,anger,depression,panic,andshame Chronic procrastinators may have low self-esteem and suffer extreme guilt
  166. Refer the student for individual or group counseling when the student is suffering emotionally or academically from her/his procrastination
  167. What do you avoid?
  168. Assuming that the student is lazy or stupid
  169. Communicating in ways that increase shame and, thereby, decrease motivation to change
  170. Being pushy because the student could respond with resentment or rebellion
  171. Conveying disappointment or irritation if the student does not make quick progress.
  172. Conveyingdisappointmentorirritationifthestudentdoesnotmake quickprogress Such messages may lead to a stand off, which is a relationship pattern that procrastinators often have with others
  173. Thank you
  174. references

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