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Knowledge management system priyank

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Knowledge management system priyank

  1. 1. Knowledge Management System (KMS) Prashant Bajpai(91) Priyank Jain(92)
  2. 2. “The systematic process of creating, maintaining and nurturing an organization to make the best use of knowledge to create business value and generate competitive advantage” Nancy C. Shaw
  3. 3. Knowledge Management Fundamentals  Data: Facts, numbers or individual entities without context or purpose.  Information: Data that has been organized into a meaningful context (to aid decision making).  Knowledge: The human capacity (potential & actual ability) to take effective action in varied and uncertain situations
  4. 4. Forms of Knowledge  Concepts, methodologies  Facts, beliefs, truths & laws  Know what, Know how, Know why  Judgments, expectations and insights  Relationships, leverage points  Intuition & feelings  Meaning and sense making
  5. 5. Benefits of Good Business Knowledge Management  The foundation of the enterprise  Increases when shared  Snowball effect when shared (innovation)  Creates value through efficiency (process knowledge)  Reduces uncertainty/ increases time of response (environment knowledge)  Enhances the current value of products (customer knowledge)
  6. 6. Difficulties of Managing Corporate Knowledge Management  Usually exists in the minds of individuals  Buried in old reports  Knowledge Hoarding  Often leaves the organization with the employee
  7. 7. Why is KMS important?  Companies can...  Sustain knowledge regarding their products and services  Connect employees with knowledge they otherwise wouldn't have  Encouraging innovation and ideas  Creating better business decisions  Expedite projects due to less wait time of information
  8. 8. How can this be done?  Actively managing knowledge in a database or repository  Creating incentives for employees for providing and updating and using knowledge  Experts of the field providing information that will help others better accomplish their jobs  Use of Wiki’s, Software solutions
  9. 9. Difference between Data, Information, and Knowledge Knowledge Data Information Data interpretation Elaboration Learning Interpreted symbol structures - used to interpret data, elaborate on information, and learn - used withun the decision steps Interpreted symbols and symbol structures - input to a decision step - output from a decision step Observed uninterpreted symbols - signs, character sequences, patterns Aamodt A., Nygārd M. Different roles and mutual dependencies of data, information and knowledge - An AI perspective on their integration. Data &Knowledge Engineering, 1995.
  10. 10. From data administration to KMS
  11. 11. KMS components From the point of view of knowledge flow  The flow of knowledge  Knowledge cryptography  Communities of knowledge workers  Knowledge repositories and libraries
  12. 12. KMS components From the technical viewpoint  Software interface  Access and authentication tools  Collaborative intelligence tools  Application level software  Transport level software  Middleware and legacy integration software  Repositories
  13. 13. Tools for knowledge internalization Case base Problem description Describes the problem S e n d s a ttrib u te s Retrieves matchingcases Searches for similar cases Matching cases c1 c3 c2 Deliverssimilarcases Addsthenewcase Selects theappropriate case 1 2 3 4 5 6
  14. 14. KM system Knowledge KM life cycle KM system Relation of terms: knowledge, KM life cycle, KMS is used in is supported by
  15. 15. KM system Seven layers architecture Interface layer Access and authentication layer Collaborative intelligence and filtering Application layer Transport layer Middleware and legacy integration layer Repositories
  16. 16. Knowledge Types Tacit knowledge (Subjective) Explicit knowledge (Objective) Knowledge of experience (body) Simultaneous knowledge (here and now) Analog knowledge (practice) Knowledge of rationality (mind) Sequential knowledge (there and then) Digital knowledge (theory)
  17. 17. Example: KMS Software Tacit Active Net  Helps to find people  Initiate and manage collaboration  Coordinate your activities automatically with those of other people across the enterprise  Automatically learns about people's activities and focus, and identifies who should be talking or working together  Makes it easy to locate and share files, find answers to questions, or find the online conversations you should join
  18. 18. KM - Impact on businesses According to a survey conducted by E&Y in 2012on business intelligence, 87% of companies, whatever their industry is believe that they are knowledge based business.  Promotes many “healthy” business activities  The recording of knowledge artefacts  Quality management of knowledge  Leveraging lessons learned from past decisions and experiences  The sharing of best practices and the building of consistent processes
  19. 19. KM Impact on businesses cont’  Knowledge management involves stewards (those accountable for knowledge)  Knowledge management eliminates the risks associated with attrition.  knowledge management system promotes getting a good understanding of the knowledge, information, and data needs of employees  A knowledge management portal provides 24x7 access to ALL recorded knowledge
  20. 20. Case Study - Xerox  Established in the 1980’s – The Document Company  KM Incorporated into Organizational Business Strategy (1995)  Conduced extensive research before introduction into organization  Effectively communicated to employees the benefits of using KM
  21. 21. Case Study - Xerox  Eureka  Goal: To share intellectual capital  Information System created to share solutions worldwide  Benefits: Saves time, resources and money  Example: A solution developed in Toronto was used by someone in South America. In this case the person discovered that they did not have to replace a $40,000 machine that they were having difficulties with, they only had to replace a 90 cent connector.  Docushare  Web-based tool  Enabled research lab community to share progress with other scientists working on the same project.
  22. 22. The Challenge of Knowledge Management Not only of how to develop new knowledge, BUT  how to locate and acquire others’ knowledge  how to diffuse knowledge in your organisation  how to recognize knowledge interconnections  how to embody knowledge in products  how to get access to the learning experiences of customers
  23. 23. References  http://www.kmworld.com/Articles/Editorial/Feature/KMWorl d-100-Companies-That-Matter-in-Knowledge- Management-52787.aspx  http://eos.gsfc.nasa.gov/eos-ll/references/xerox.pdf  http://articles.techrepublic.com.com/5100-10878_11- 1048267.html  http://www.xerox.com/go/xrx/template/inv_rel_newsroom.js p?ed_name=NR_2006March8_KMWorld&app=Newsroom &view=newsrelease&format=article&Xcntry=USA&Xlang=e n_US  http://www.icasit.org/km/intro/slideshow/kmoverview_files/f rame.htm  http://www.coemergnece.com

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