O slideshow foi denunciado.
Seu SlideShare está sendo baixado. ×

Study Skills Playbook Webinar Slides

Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Carregando em…3
×

Confira estes a seguir

1 de 33 Anúncio
Anúncio

Mais Conteúdo rRelacionado

Diapositivos para si (20)

Anúncio

Semelhante a Study Skills Playbook Webinar Slides (20)

Mais recentes (20)

Anúncio

Study Skills Playbook Webinar Slides

  1. 1. Insider Study Skills WEBINAR HOST: Binny Langler     Author of Study Skills Playbook
  2. 2. About Me Binny Langler Founder of The Inkling Effect; Helping students chase their dreams and find pathways to careers they love. Digital Strategist, Content Marketer & Social Media Coach. Mother to two gorgeous girls, wife to a wonderful husband. Swimmer, baker of delicious treats and believer in the power of every person. I believe… •  It’s important to acknowledge your achievements. •  Worrying about what hasn’t happened is wasted energy. •  A day without laughter is a day wasted. •  Every single person has the ability to make their dreams come true.
  3. 3. What we are going to cover •  Goal setting •  Planning your time + space •  Insider study tips •  Essential study skills •  Procrastination •  Note Taking •  Sleep and Wellbeing •  Maths isn’t a monster •  Preparation for exams •  Secrets for passing exams
  4. 4. The adult human brain weighs around 3lbs and consumes ten times more energy by weight than the rest of the body. This is an awful lot of power waiting to be switched on. And what switches it on? Goals
  5. 5. Goal Setting
  6. 6. Action plan
  7. 7. Planning your Time This includes leisure activities and sleep too! •  There is the commitment to classes and lectures(say, 30 hours a week), •  The ‘overtime’ of homework, which takes priority over study, •  Homework can take up to 3 hours a night, with up to 6 hours on weekends during peak study times, This lifts your weekly total to between forty to fifty hours, depending on your demands. You will probably feel you need another ten hours a week for study, reading and revision, making a total of more than fifty hours a week. That means that you work longer hours than most adults in the workforce! No wonder you get tired. NOTE: Many people see homework and study as the same thing. They are not. Study is learning or self-teaching. It’s time to make a plan to get the most from your limited time;
  8. 8. Rate Your Subjects We suggest that — as for diving and gymnastics at the Olympic Games — you should give your subjects a ‘degree of difficulty’, for example: •  1 to 3 for the easy ones, •  4 to 6 for the okay ones, and •  7 to 10 for the hard ones. Each degree of difficulty calls for half an hour of work. So, your study load would look like this…
  9. 9. Planning Your Time
  10. 10. Your Workspace The three absolutely basic requirements are: •  A sturdy table or desk, with ample worktop area; •  A stable, straight-backed chair, which gives support but not too much (doze- inducing) comfort; and •  A good desk lamp, which throws plenty of light on your work area. And, the non-negotiables are: •  Mobile phones are NOT to be on, or in the same room with you whilst studying. Not even for texting, Instagram, Snapchat or Facebook messenger. Nothing! •  If using your computer to study, you must not have any social media or email accounts open the background (you will be too easily lured into checking them periodically)
  11. 11. Our Top 7 Insider Study Tips
  12. 12. 11 Essential Study Skills 1.  Listening Skills 2.  Speed Reading 3.  Chunking 4.  Switch between thinking modes 5.  Memory maximisation 6.  Spaced Repetition 7.  Mind Mapping 8.  Using your dictionary 9.  Research 10. Referencing 11. Managing Digital Distractions
  13. 13. 1.Speed Reading Scan – do a quick read Tear – grab a copy File – Store it away Read – when you need This technique should cut your reading time down by 50%.
  14. 14. 2. Mind Mapping
  15. 15. 3. Digital Distractions
  16. 16. Procrastination Tips to Overcome Procrastination: •  Eat your Frog. Do the worst or hardest thing first when you sit down to study, or when you are fresh in the morning. •  Make yourself accountable. It’s easy not to stick to your plan, or avoid the difficult tasks or subjects. Make yourself accountable to a friend of family member. •  Plan a no-procrastination day. Make a list of all the things you’ve been avoiding or don’t want to do and tackle them all together. •  Start your day again at midday. If you are studying all day make sure you stop in the middle of the day and reassess how far you have got on your to-do list. •  Break your workload into bite size pieces. Rather than feeling overwhelmed by your workload, use the Pomodoro Technique to create manageable chunks of work you can systematically complete. •  Avoid interruptions. Thanks to social media our attention span is very short. Do not allow digital notifications, email alerts, messenger, Snap Chat, calls or texts to pull you away from your work (even if it’s only for 1 minute).
  17. 17. The Pomodoro Technique 1.  Choose something you need to get done 2. Set your pomodoro timer for 25 minutes 3. Work on the task until the pomodoro (your timer) rings 4. When the pomodoro rings, STOP! 5. Take a short break 5 minute 6. Every 4 pomodoros, take a longer break
  18. 18. Note Taking - 6 Rules There are six basic rules, which apply to all note making: •  Always work on the same sized paper, never on some old scraps of paper. We recommend loose-leaf paper with holes punched for clipping into a binder; •  Make all your notes neatly. On no account doodle on your note sheets, no matter how boring a particular lesson or lecture might be. •  We have found that the inverted triangle is the best shape for laying out notes. You start each triangle with a new key point. Supporting points follow underneath in a stepped fashion. •  By the very nature of a note you don’t write proper sentences, but headings, sub-headings and phrases, which will remind you later of the things which are important. •  The brevity of your notes(and their speed)can be heightened by using your own semi-shorthand. •  Your notes should look enticing. Use colours, as well as highlighter pens, to emphasize key points.
  19. 19. Sleep & Well Being The best asset we have for making a contribution to the world is ourselves. If we underinvest in ourselves, and by that I mean our minds, bodies, and our spirits, we damage the very tool we need to make our contribution. Greg McKeown, Author, Essentialism (2014)
  20. 20. Sleep - your secret weapon A tired brain, while technically awake, is barely functioning. It is harder to think, plan, prioritise, or see the bigger picture. It is hard to make decisions or choices and nearly impossible to discern the essential from the trivial. Who wants to learn or study under those circumstances? The National Sleep Foundation (USA) recommends: -  teenagers 14-17 years need between 8-10 hour sleep each night, -  young adults 18-25 years need between 7-9 hours.
  21. 21. Nourish with food Tips to stay healthy on the inside: •  Stay hydrated •  Minimise your Caffeine •  Never skip breakfast •  Eat five to six smaller •  Eat plenty of protein •  Maximise your brain foods like fish, nuts, dark chocolate, berries, legumes (chickpeas, kidney beans, lentils), onions, whole grains, apples, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, brussel sprouts, bok choy and spinach
  22. 22. Maths isn’t a Monster The following hints may be useful in your math study: •  The first requirement in maths studies is to give it your fullest attention. •  Get ahead in the book; try to work some of the problems before they are covered in class. Let your brain get familiar with the content first. •  If you don’t grasp a new topic the first time it is presented, you must ask the teacher to explain it again; •  During the lesson, listen to what is said. This is where your understanding will come from. •  Listen actively, taking down notes from the board and any important comments the teacher makes. •  Try to answer questions and join in these discussions. •  Keep your notes in a separate book, not on sheets which can be lost; and write the set homework in this same book, preferably in red, so when you revise, you know which questions go with each topic. •  Math is learned by doing problems. Do the homework. •  Form a study group. Meet once a week (or skype/ google hangouts). •  Good study habits throughout the semester make it easier to study for tests. Falling a day behind puts you at a disadvantage. Falling a week behind puts you in deep trouble.
  23. 23. Preparation for Exams
  24. 24. Plan Your Exam Revision Art Exam
  25. 25. Secrets to Passing Exams •  ‘Make sure that you allocate your time between each section in accordance with marks available.’ Dr. Graham Richards, Economics •  Michelle Foran, a psychology teacher, has been marking exams for almost 15 years ‘read questions mindfully - if rushed they might confuse psychological and physiological for example’ •  ‘Be prepared that’s the answer. There are three aspects to preparation of your work during the year: your knowledge of the skills required in an exam; the format of the examination; your revision in the final days.’ Lesley Hardcastle, English •  ‘The first and most important step in this course is to gain a thorough knowledge of the texts.’ Doug McCurry, English Literature •  ‘If you know your physics and have done many examples and problems you are in good shape to do the examination.’ Dr Max Thompson, Physics •  ‘Any student sitting for an examination needs two things to do well: familiarity with the syllabus and confidence.’ Dr Neil Murray, Biology •  ‘I urge you to read thoroughly past examiners’ reports. These reports, compiled from the observations and experiences of examiners, provide detailed advice in both the practical and theoretical areas.’ Lynton Oaten, Art •  ‘Have you made use of a resource we do not always think of — the knowledge and problems of other students? Sharing your knowledge and questions can help to polish your own skills.’ Dr Peter Tregloan, Chemistry •  ‘In the lead up to the exam, do not do anything rash like have a love affair or leave home. Stay busy but get enough sleep. And rest easy that this subject is run by human beings who love their subject, love a good argument and hope you do too.’ Suzanne Mellor, Australian History
  26. 26. Download your copy on AMAZON
  27. 27. Thanks for joining me… Tell your friends…
  28. 28. www.theinklingeffect.com.au

×