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Agile UX – How To Avoid Big Design Up Front By Pretending Not To Do Big Design Up Front

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My talk from UX Camp London 2011, about the lie of "No Big Design Up Front," the opinion that UX people need to be less lazy and feckless, and finding the gap between the two where Agile UX can flourish.

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Agile UX – How To Avoid Big Design Up Front By Pretending Not To Do Big Design Up Front

  1. The Secret Of Agile UX James O’Brien james@sparrk.co.uk
  2. The Secret Of Agile UX Or, How to avoid Big Design Up Front by pretending not to do Big Design Up Front James O’Brien james@sparrk.co.uk
  3. Who is this guy anyway?
  4. Who is this guy anyway? UX Freelancer for 10 years
  5. Who is this guy anyway? UX Freelancer for 10 years Agile UX practitioner for 5 years
  6. Who is this guy anyway? UX Freelancer for 10 years Agile UX practitioner for 5 years Sideline in Agile Enablement
  7. Who is this guy anyway? UX Freelancer for 10 years Agile UX practitioner for 5 years Sideline in Agile Enablement I HAVE DONE WRONG THINGS
  8. Who is this guy anyway? UX Freelancer for 10 years Agile UX practitioner for 5 years Sideline in Agile Enablement I HAVE DONE WRONG THINGS But you can learn from my mistakes
  9. ๏ No magic bullets contained within
  10. ๏ No magic bullets contained within ๏ Do not attempt to implement by rote
  11. ๏ No magic bullets contained within ๏ Do not attempt to implement by rote ๏ Not guaranteed to work with Enterprise Agile, Cargo Cult Agile or Scrumbut
  12. ๏ No magic bullets contained within ๏ Do not attempt to implement by rote ๏ Not guaranteed to work with Enterprise Agile, Cargo Cult Agile or Scrumbut ๏ Requires interaction with BAs and Developers
  13. ๏ No magic bullets contained within ๏ Do not attempt to implement by rote ๏ Not guaranteed to work with Enterprise Agile, Cargo Cult Agile or Scrumbut ๏ Requires interaction with BAs and Developers ๏ Risk of improved delivery and morale
  14. “No Big Design Up Front”
  15. i1 i2 i3 i4 i5
  16. Design for i1 i1 i2 i3 i4 i5
  17. Design Design for i1 for i2 i1 i2 i3 i4 i5
  18. Design Design Design for i1 for i2 for i3 i1 i2 i3 i4 i5
  19. Design Design Design Design for i1 for i2 for i3 for i4 i1 i2 i3 i4 i5
  20. Design Design Design Design Design for i1 for i2 for i3 for i4 for i5 i1 i2 i3 i4 i5
  21. Have a Design Design Design Design Design fucking for i1 for i2 for i3 for i4 for i5 party i1 i2 i3 i4 i5
  22. Have a Design Design Design Design Design fucking for i1 for i2 for i3 for i4 for i5 party i1 i2 i3 i4 i5 THIS NEVER WORKS
  23. i0 i1 i2 i3 i4 i5 Agile’s Dirty Secret: i0
  24. i0 i1 i2 i3 i4 i5
  25. Design for i1 i0 i1 i2 i3 i4 i5
  26. Design Design for i1 for i1 & i2 i0 i1 i2 i3 i4 i5
  27. Design Design Design for i1 for i2 for i1 & i2 & i3 i0 i1 i2 i3 i4 i5
  28. Design Design Design Design for i1 for i2 for i3 for i1 & i2 & i3 & i4 i0 i1 i2 i3 i4 i5
  29. Design Design Design Design Design for i1 for i2 for i3 for i4 for i1 & i2 & i3 & i4 & i5 i0 i1 i2 i3 i4 i5
  30. Design Design Design Design Design Design for i5, for i1 for i2 for i3 for i4 for i1 & i2 & i3 & i4 & i5 plan fucking party i0 i1 i2 i3 i4 i5
  31. Design Design Design Design Design Have a Design for i5, for i1 for i2 for i3 for i4 fucking for i1 & i2 & i3 & i4 & i5 plan fucking party party i0 i1 i2 i3 i4 i5
  32. Design Design Design Design Design Have a Design for i5, for i1 for i2 for i3 for i4 fucking for i1 & i2 & i3 & i4 & i5 plan fucking party party i0 i1 i2 i3 i4 i5 THIS NEVER WORKS
  33. Agile’s Other Dirty Secret: Planning
  34. Gather Requirements Agile’s Other Dirty Secret: Planning
  35. Gather Analyse Requirements Requirements Agile’s Other Dirty Secret: Planning
  36. Gather Analyse Write Requirements Requirements Epics Agile’s Other Dirty Secret: Planning
  37. Gather Analyse Write Scope Requirements Requirements Epics R1 Agile’s Other Dirty Secret: Planning
  38. Gather Analyse Write Scope Write Requirements Requirements Epics R1 Stories Agile’s Other Dirty Secret: Planning
  39. Gather Analyse Write Scope Write Plan Requirements Requirements Epics R1 Stories R1 Agile’s Other Dirty Secret: Planning
  40. Gather Analyse Write Scope Write Plan Requirements Requirements Epics R1 Stories R1 Agile’s Other Dirty Secret: Planning ~= Design
  41. Write Epics
  42. Wait... isn’t that how design works?
  43. Wait... isn’t that how design works? ✦ Pair with BAs during analysis
  44. Wait... isn’t that how design works? ✦ Pair with BAs during analysis ✦ Wireframe based on requirements and feed those into epics
  45. Wait... isn’t that how design works? ✦ Pair with BAs during analysis ✦ Wireframe based on requirements and feed those into epics ✦ Refine your wireframes as the epics are validated by the business
  46. Wait... isn’t that how design works? ✦ Pair with BAs during analysis ✦ Wireframe based on requirements and feed those into epics ✦ Refine your wireframes as the epics are validated by the business ✦ Some IA and UX artefacts will pop out of this process naturally
  47. Wait... isn’t that how design works? ✦ Pair with BAs during analysis ✦ Wireframe based on requirements and feed those into epics ✦ Refine your wireframes as the epics are validated by the business ✦ Some IA and UX artefacts will pop out of this process naturally ✦ Develop your modular design language
  48. Wait... isn’t that how design works? ✦ Pair with BAs during analysis ✦ Wireframe based on requirements and feed those into epics ✦ Refine your wireframes as the epics are validated by the business ✦ Some IA and UX artefacts will pop out of this process naturally ✦ Develop your modular design language ✦ Only go hi-fi when the release is scoped
  49. Gather Analyse Write Scope Write Plan Requirements Requirements Epics R1 Stories R1
  50. Gather Analyse Write Scope Write Plan Requirements Requirements Epics R1 Stories R1 Identify UX Requirements
  51. Gather Analyse Write Scope Write Plan Requirements Requirements Epics R1 Stories R1 Define Identify UX large-scale IA Requirements (to feed into epics)
  52. Gather Analyse Write Scope Write Plan Requirements Requirements Epics R1 Stories R1 Define Identify UX large-scale IA Wireframe Requirements (to feed Epics into epics)
  53. Gather Analyse Write Scope Write Plan Requirements Requirements Epics R1 Stories R1 Define Begin Identify UX large-scale IA Wireframe site Requirements (to feed Epics design into epics) language
  54. Gather Analyse Write Scope Write Plan Requirements Requirements Epics R1 Stories R1 Define Begin Identify UX large-scale IA Wireframe site Wireframe Requirements (to feed Epics design Stories into epics) language
  55. Gather Analyse Write Scope Write Plan Requirements Requirements Epics R1 Stories R1 Define Begin Identify UX large-scale IA Wireframe site Wireframe Hi-Fi Requirements (to feed Epics design Stories i1 of R1 into epics) language
  56. Align Your Strategies Early
  57. Align Your Strategies Early ✦ Mobile First == Agile Minimum Valuable Product
  58. Align Your Strategies Early ✦ Mobile First == Agile Minimum Valuable Product ✦ User Testing fits with frequent demos and releases
  59. Align Your Strategies Early ✦ Mobile First == Agile Minimum Valuable Product ✦ User Testing fits with frequent demos and releases ✦ Browser Testing fits with Continuous QA
  60. Align Your Strategies Early ✦ Mobile First == Agile Minimum Valuable Product ✦ User Testing fits with frequent demos and releases ✦ Browser Testing fits with Continuous QA ✦ Accessibility exposes a layer that automated testing can exploit
  61. Align Your Strategies Early ✦ Mobile First == Agile Minimum Valuable Product ✦ User Testing fits with frequent demos and releases ✦ Browser Testing fits with Continuous QA ✦ Accessibility exposes a layer that automated testing can exploit ✦ Feedback from the business validates your design
  62. Align Your Strategies Early ✦ Mobile First == Agile Minimum Valuable Product ✦ User Testing fits with frequent demos and releases ✦ Browser Testing fits with Continuous QA ✦ Accessibility exposes a layer that automated testing can exploit ✦ Feedback from the business validates your design ✦ Share knowledge with BAs wherever possible
  63. Support Story Writing
  64. Support Story Writing ✦ Feed Wireframes into stories as functional artefacts
  65. Support Story Writing ✦ Feed Wireframes into stories as functional artefacts ✦ Develop your personas with BAs so they can frame stories around the personas
  66. Support Story Writing ✦ Feed Wireframes into stories as functional artefacts ✦ Develop your personas with BAs so they can frame stories around the personas ✦ Define your UX principles as NFRs
  67. Support Story Writing ✦ Feed Wireframes into stories as functional artefacts ✦ Develop your personas with BAs so they can frame stories around the personas ✦ Define your UX principles as NFRs ✦ Let developers know that the wireframes are canonical
  68. Support Story Writing ✦ Feed Wireframes into stories as functional artefacts ✦ Develop your personas with BAs so they can frame stories around the personas ✦ Define your UX principles as NFRs ✦ Let developers know that the wireframes are canonical ✦ Feed hi-fis if you have them, but keep the developers focused on the wireframes
  69. During Development
  70. Prepare to Refactor
  71. Prepare to Refactor ✦ Organise your files to prepare for change
  72. Prepare to Refactor ✦ Organise your files to prepare for change http://photoshopetiquette.com/
  73. Prepare to Refactor ✦ Organise your files to prepare for change
  74. Prepare to Refactor ✦ Organise your files to prepare for change ✦ Use design/UX patterns wherever possible
  75. Prepare to Refactor ✦ Organise your files to prepare for change ✦ Use design/UX patterns wherever possible ✦ Use stubbed design and UX debt
  76. Prepare to Refactor ✦ Organise your files to prepare for change ✦ Use design/UX patterns wherever possible ✦ Use stubbed design and UX debt ✦ Build a reusable asset library early on
  77. Prepare to Refactor ✦ Organise your files to prepare for change ✦ Use design/UX patterns wherever possible ✦ Use stubbed design and UX debt ✦ Build a reusable asset library early on ✦ Use a preprocessor like LESS to ensure your CSS can be quickly refactored
  78. Prepare to Refactor ✦ Organise your files to prepare for change ✦ Use design/UX patterns wherever possible ✦ Use stubbed design and UX debt ✦ Build a reusable asset library early on ✦ Use a preprocessor like LESS to ensure your CSS can be quickly refactored ✦ Focus on high-friction targets first - the UX debt will be less painful for users on the low-friction ones
  79. Digression:
  80. Digression:
  81. Digression: We Need To Rethink The Way We Do Deliverables
  82. The web is not flat images any more
  83. The web is not flat images any more ✦ We need to be able to show multiple states and animations easily
  84. The web is not flat images any more ✦ We need to be able to show multiple states and animations easily ✦ We need the rest of the team to be able to understand the scope of a design unambiguously
  85. The web is not flat images any more ✦ We need to be able to show multiple states and animations easily ✦ We need the rest of the team to be able to understand the scope of a design unambiguously ✦ We need to be able to refactor our deliverables quickly, and have the refactoring cascade through the whole project
  86. The web is not flat images any more ✦ We need to be able to show multiple states and animations easily ✦ We need the rest of the team to be able to understand the scope of a design unambiguously ✦ We need to be able to refactor our deliverables quickly, and have the refactoring cascade through the whole project ✦ We need to have a tool that supports patterns and modularity
  87. Hannah Donovan ✦ What does our 3/4 view look like? ✦ http://www.webdirections.org/ resources/hannah-donovan- designing-without-the-browser/ ✦ http://www.webdirections.org/ resources/hannah-donovan- telling-stories-through-design/ ✦ @han
  88. Jan Srutek http://www.slideshare.net/JanSru/communicating-and- selling-ux-design-deliverables
  89. Project Meteor http://projectmeteor.org/
  90. Stubbed Designs?
  91. Stubbed Designs? ✦ Stubbed Designs act as placeholders for features that haven’t been designed yet
  92. Stubbed Designs? ✦ Stubbed Designs act as placeholders for features that haven’t been designed yet ✦ They can also be your progressive enhancement baseline
  93. Stubbed Designs? ✦ Stubbed Designs act as placeholders for features that haven’t been designed yet ✦ They can also be your progressive enhancement baseline ✦ They should be simple, but they don’t need to be ugly
  94. You can flag stubs too .stub:before{ width : 64px; height : 64px; background : url(/core/images/nodeploy/flag-stub.png) right top no-repeat; display : block; content:" "; position : absolute; right : 0; top : 0;} .stub{position : relative;}
  95. You can flag stubs too .stub:before{ width : 64px; height : 64px; background : url(/core/images/nodeploy/flag-stub.png) right top no-repeat; display : block; content:" "; position : absolute; right : 0; top : 0;} .stub{position : relative;}
  96. UX Debt?
  97. UX Debt? “Good enough” or “quick fix” solutions that get you past a problem quickly
  98. UX Debt? “Good enough” or “quick fix” solutions that get you past a problem quickly But too much debt can choke a project further down the line
  99. UX Debt? “Good enough” or “quick fix” solutions that get you past a problem quickly But too much debt can choke a project further down the line So you must address UX debt periodically - during i zero or UAT are good times
  100. Defining “Done”
  101. Defining “Done” ✦ Don’t be precious about signoff
  102. Defining “Done” ✦ Don’t be precious about signoff ✦ If it works well enough, sign it off and raise an enhancement - let the client decide how important design perfection is
  103. Defining “Done” ✦ Don’t be precious about signoff ✦ If it works well enough, sign it off and raise an enhancement - let the client decide how important design perfection is ✦ Or track imperfections as defects or UX debt and raise tasks to fix them
  104. Defining “Done” ✦ Don’t be precious about signoff ✦ If it works well enough, sign it off and raise an enhancement - let the client decide how important design perfection is ✦ Or track imperfections as defects or UX debt and raise tasks to fix them ✦ Be open to developers’ suggestions but stand firm on the really important stuff
  105. Continuous Availability
  106. Continuous Availability ✦ Is horrible and makes it difficult to get into the zone and you can’t listen to music and YOU HAVE TO DO IT
  107. Continuous Availability ✦ Is horrible and makes it difficult to get into the zone and you can’t listen to music and YOU HAVE TO DO IT ✦ If developers think you’re unapproachable, they’ll guess at implementation – THIS IS BAD
  108. Continuous Availability ✦ Is horrible and makes it difficult to get into the zone and you can’t listen to music and YOU HAVE TO DO IT ✦ If developers think you’re unapproachable, they’ll guess at implementation – THIS IS BAD ✦ Be available with your body language as well as your speech: “My time is infinite and you can have as much as you want”
  109. Continuous Availability Strategies
  110. Continuous Availability Strategies ✦ The Sacrificial Lamb – when there are >1 people in a role, they rotate their availability
  111. Continuous Availability Strategies ✦ The Sacrificial Lamb – when there are >1 people in a role, they rotate their availability ✦ The Scary Face – a physical flag you can raise when you need to focus, but it requires a lot of discipline
  112. Continuous Availability Strategies ✦ The Sacrificial Lamb – when there are >1 people in a role, they rotate their availability ✦ The Scary Face – a physical flag you can raise when you need to focus, but it requires a lot of discipline ✦ No-meeting Hours – you stay available to the team but no meetings can be booked, reduces the chance of being pulled away
  113. Continuous Availability Strategies ✦ The Sacrificial Lamb – when there are >1 people in a role, they rotate their availability ✦ The Scary Face – a physical flag you can raise when you need to focus, but it requires a lot of discipline ✦ No-meeting Hours – you stay available to the team but no meetings can be booked, reduces the chance of being pulled away ✦ Be careful not to overuse these and drive devs away!
  114. Leverage QA and Showcases
  115. Leverage QA and Showcases ✦ Don’t let the devs destroy the showcase environment - use it for guerilla user testing!
  116. Leverage QA and Showcases ✦ Don’t let the devs destroy the showcase environment - use it for guerilla user testing! ✦ Ensure the devs focus on making deployment simple so you can incorporate rapid prototyping (but you probably don’t want to do this on the showcase environment)
  117. Leverage QA and Showcases ✦ Don’t let the devs destroy the showcase environment - use it for guerilla user testing! ✦ Ensure the devs focus on making deployment simple so you can incorporate rapid prototyping (but you probably don’t want to do this on the showcase environment) ✦ You can automate some UI and accessibility testing using Selenium: http://code.google.com/p/web- accessibility-testing/downloads/list
  118. Leverage QA and Showcases ✦ Don’t let the devs destroy the showcase environment - use it for guerilla user testing! ✦ Ensure the devs focus on making deployment simple so you can incorporate rapid prototyping (but you probably don’t want to do this on the showcase environment) ✦ You can automate some UI and accessibility testing using Selenium: http://code.google.com/p/web- accessibility-testing/downloads/list ✦ While you’re automating, ensure that test data is structured so as to stress the UI
  119. There’s more How do we estimate UX effort? Leveraging Test Data Reusable Brainstorming UX and Automation UX and Spikes Optimising Research with Agile UX on the card wall
  120. Agile Won’t Wait http://www.flickr.com/photos/uriel1998/
  121. Now go and build incredible things.
  122. Thank You James O’Brien james@sparrk.co.uk

Notas

  • This talk was going to be called “Why Agile People are liars and UX People are lazy and feckless” but I try and keep getting lynched to once a month so instead I called it...\n
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  • I’m also making one very large assumption here, and that is that your team is the right size to deliver the scope of the project you have. If your team needs two UXers and they only have you, that’s a problem that this talk is not designed to address.\n
  • I’m also making one very large assumption here, and that is that your team is the right size to deliver the scope of the project you have. If your team needs two UXers and they only have you, that’s a problem that this talk is not designed to address.\n
  • I’m also making one very large assumption here, and that is that your team is the right size to deliver the scope of the project you have. If your team needs two UXers and they only have you, that’s a problem that this talk is not designed to address.\n
  • I’m also making one very large assumption here, and that is that your team is the right size to deliver the scope of the project you have. If your team needs two UXers and they only have you, that’s a problem that this talk is not designed to address.\n
  • I’m also making one very large assumption here, and that is that your team is the right size to deliver the scope of the project you have. If your team needs two UXers and they only have you, that’s a problem that this talk is not designed to address.\n
  • No Big Design Up Front – we all know what this means right? No, you’re wrong. “Design” means a lot of things in software development, and it’s easy for PMs, BAs and us to attach this tenet to the wrong sort of design.\n
  • Of course because that short uncomplicated planning period doesn’t leave a lot of time to front-load the design, you may have tried doing something like this. This never works because design effort and development effort can be orthogonal. Something gets planned in for i4 that would take more than one iteration to design, and suddenly you’re swamped. No fucking party for you!\n
  • Of course because that short uncomplicated planning period doesn’t leave a lot of time to front-load the design, you may have tried doing something like this. This never works because design effort and development effort can be orthogonal. Something gets planned in for i4 that would take more than one iteration to design, and suddenly you’re swamped. No fucking party for you!\n
  • Of course because that short uncomplicated planning period doesn’t leave a lot of time to front-load the design, you may have tried doing something like this. This never works because design effort and development effort can be orthogonal. Something gets planned in for i4 that would take more than one iteration to design, and suddenly you’re swamped. No fucking party for you!\n
  • Of course because that short uncomplicated planning period doesn’t leave a lot of time to front-load the design, you may have tried doing something like this. This never works because design effort and development effort can be orthogonal. Something gets planned in for i4 that would take more than one iteration to design, and suddenly you’re swamped. No fucking party for you!\n
  • Of course because that short uncomplicated planning period doesn’t leave a lot of time to front-load the design, you may have tried doing something like this. This never works because design effort and development effort can be orthogonal. Something gets planned in for i4 that would take more than one iteration to design, and suddenly you’re swamped. No fucking party for you!\n
  • Of course because that short uncomplicated planning period doesn’t leave a lot of time to front-load the design, you may have tried doing something like this. This never works because design effort and development effort can be orthogonal. Something gets planned in for i4 that would take more than one iteration to design, and suddenly you’re swamped. No fucking party for you!\n
  • Of course because that short uncomplicated planning period doesn’t leave a lot of time to front-load the design, you may have tried doing something like this. This never works because design effort and development effort can be orthogonal. Something gets planned in for i4 that would take more than one iteration to design, and suddenly you’re swamped. No fucking party for you!\n
  • Oh thank God, you think, this extra iteration gives me a bit more time to front-load the design work! You may have seen this pattern at work, I know Lynn Miller famously wrote a case study around it, and Johanna Kollman has presented it as her research solution: http://www.agileproductdesign.com/useful_papers/miller_customer_input_in_agile_projects.pdf Fortunately Johanna’s not in the room tonight, because...\n
  • Nope, all that happens is the design work expands to fill the time available – only because it never had enough time to be done right in the first place. Design and development can be more orthogonal than this – you need to either front-load as much as you can, or find ways to simplify the design process and make it responsive to changing priorities.\n
  • Nope, all that happens is the design work expands to fill the time available – only because it never had enough time to be done right in the first place. Design and development can be more orthogonal than this – you need to either front-load as much as you can, or find ways to simplify the design process and make it responsive to changing priorities.\n
  • Nope, all that happens is the design work expands to fill the time available – only because it never had enough time to be done right in the first place. Design and development can be more orthogonal than this – you need to either front-load as much as you can, or find ways to simplify the design process and make it responsive to changing priorities.\n
  • Nope, all that happens is the design work expands to fill the time available – only because it never had enough time to be done right in the first place. Design and development can be more orthogonal than this – you need to either front-load as much as you can, or find ways to simplify the design process and make it responsive to changing priorities.\n
  • Nope, all that happens is the design work expands to fill the time available – only because it never had enough time to be done right in the first place. Design and development can be more orthogonal than this – you need to either front-load as much as you can, or find ways to simplify the design process and make it responsive to changing priorities.\n
  • Nope, all that happens is the design work expands to fill the time available – only because it never had enough time to be done right in the first place. Design and development can be more orthogonal than this – you need to either front-load as much as you can, or find ways to simplify the design process and make it responsive to changing priorities.\n
  • Nope, all that happens is the design work expands to fill the time available – only because it never had enough time to be done right in the first place. Design and development can be more orthogonal than this – you need to either front-load as much as you can, or find ways to simplify the design process and make it responsive to changing priorities.\n
  • Nope, all that happens is the design work expands to fill the time available – only because it never had enough time to be done right in the first place. Design and development can be more orthogonal than this – you need to either front-load as much as you can, or find ways to simplify the design process and make it responsive to changing priorities.\n
  • But what happens if you focus on that nice uncomplicated planning? Here’s a typical planning session. Gosh, look at that - you probably know what’s being delivered in R1 a long time before R1 starts development. Note that it’s easier (cheaper) to add time to planning than development, so if you need more time, ask early!\n
  • But what happens if you focus on that nice uncomplicated planning? Here’s a typical planning session. Gosh, look at that - you probably know what’s being delivered in R1 a long time before R1 starts development. Note that it’s easier (cheaper) to add time to planning than development, so if you need more time, ask early!\n
  • But what happens if you focus on that nice uncomplicated planning? Here’s a typical planning session. Gosh, look at that - you probably know what’s being delivered in R1 a long time before R1 starts development. Note that it’s easier (cheaper) to add time to planning than development, so if you need more time, ask early!\n
  • But what happens if you focus on that nice uncomplicated planning? Here’s a typical planning session. Gosh, look at that - you probably know what’s being delivered in R1 a long time before R1 starts development. Note that it’s easier (cheaper) to add time to planning than development, so if you need more time, ask early!\n
  • But what happens if you focus on that nice uncomplicated planning? Here’s a typical planning session. Gosh, look at that - you probably know what’s being delivered in R1 a long time before R1 starts development. Note that it’s easier (cheaper) to add time to planning than development, so if you need more time, ask early!\n
  • But what happens if you focus on that nice uncomplicated planning? Here’s a typical planning session. Gosh, look at that - you probably know what’s being delivered in R1 a long time before R1 starts development. Note that it’s easier (cheaper) to add time to planning than development, so if you need more time, ask early!\n
  • But what happens if you focus on that nice uncomplicated planning? Here’s a typical planning session. Gosh, look at that - you probably know what’s being delivered in R1 a long time before R1 starts development. Note that it’s easier (cheaper) to add time to planning than development, so if you need more time, ask early!\n
  • So what process does a BA go through to turn analysed requirements into epics? Well, it’s another iterative process. Define what you think the behaviour is, validate that with the stakeholders, refine your assumptions based on their response. Wait a minute...\n
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  • So here are the BA’s high-level tasks and the corresponding UX tasks. Oooh! I see a synergy!\n
  • So here are the BA’s high-level tasks and the corresponding UX tasks. Oooh! I see a synergy!\n
  • So here are the BA’s high-level tasks and the corresponding UX tasks. Oooh! I see a synergy!\n
  • So here are the BA’s high-level tasks and the corresponding UX tasks. Oooh! I see a synergy!\n
  • So here are the BA’s high-level tasks and the corresponding UX tasks. Oooh! I see a synergy!\n
  • So here are the BA’s high-level tasks and the corresponding UX tasks. Oooh! I see a synergy!\n
  • Also, keep the list of stakeholders with UX input as small as possible. I don’t care how many stakeholders you have, only a subset really need input into UX and design - your job is to whittle that subset to the very minimum. Conspire with the BA on this one, believe me they have strategies for doing this sort of thing.\n
  • Also, keep the list of stakeholders with UX input as small as possible. I don’t care how many stakeholders you have, only a subset really need input into UX and design - your job is to whittle that subset to the very minimum. Conspire with the BA on this one, believe me they have strategies for doing this sort of thing.\n
  • Also, keep the list of stakeholders with UX input as small as possible. I don’t care how many stakeholders you have, only a subset really need input into UX and design - your job is to whittle that subset to the very minimum. Conspire with the BA on this one, believe me they have strategies for doing this sort of thing.\n
  • Also, keep the list of stakeholders with UX input as small as possible. I don’t care how many stakeholders you have, only a subset really need input into UX and design - your job is to whittle that subset to the very minimum. Conspire with the BA on this one, believe me they have strategies for doing this sort of thing.\n
  • Also, keep the list of stakeholders with UX input as small as possible. I don’t care how many stakeholders you have, only a subset really need input into UX and design - your job is to whittle that subset to the very minimum. Conspire with the BA on this one, believe me they have strategies for doing this sort of thing.\n
  • Also, keep the list of stakeholders with UX input as small as possible. I don’t care how many stakeholders you have, only a subset really need input into UX and design - your job is to whittle that subset to the very minimum. Conspire with the BA on this one, believe me they have strategies for doing this sort of thing.\n
  • The last point only applies if you’re not being cavalier about your wireframes like I am\n
  • The last point only applies if you’re not being cavalier about your wireframes like I am\n
  • The last point only applies if you’re not being cavalier about your wireframes like I am\n
  • The last point only applies if you’re not being cavalier about your wireframes like I am\n
  • The last point only applies if you’re not being cavalier about your wireframes like I am\n
  • By the time development begins, you’re still not going to have everything ready. But you should know what’s coming, and you should be able to feed a starting point to the developers, and prioritise your own goals for the coming iterations. LIASE WITH THE BAs ON THAT POINT.\n
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  • We’ll talk about stubbed design and UX debt in a moment\n\n
  • We’ll talk about stubbed design and UX debt in a moment\n\n
  • We’ll talk about stubbed design and UX debt in a moment\n\n
  • We’ll talk about stubbed design and UX debt in a moment\n\n
  • We’ll talk about stubbed design and UX debt in a moment\n\n
  • Change is a fact of life in software development. Agile is a tool designed around that fact, and to make it work, Software Engineers have had to develop strategies and tools. Now it’s our turn to either make those strategies apply to UX or develop our own. Because ultimately Agile will allow us to make better things faster.\n
  • Change is a fact of life in software development. Agile is a tool designed around that fact, and to make it work, Software Engineers have had to develop strategies and tools. Now it’s our turn to either make those strategies apply to UX or develop our own. Because ultimately Agile will allow us to make better things faster.\n
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  • Stubbed design means that forthcoming requirements don’t need to hold up development in the present. Maybe you have an ugly but functional flow that you can add with minimal branding. Or maybe you have the visual design roughly set but the behaviour is still being refined. Get it to a form where it can be included - maybe that’s just a static image - and get it in there\n
  • Stubbed design means that forthcoming requirements don’t need to hold up development in the present. Maybe you have an ugly but functional flow that you can add with minimal branding. Or maybe you have the visual design roughly set but the behaviour is still being refined. Get it to a form where it can be included - maybe that’s just a static image - and get it in there\n
  • Stubbed design means that forthcoming requirements don’t need to hold up development in the present. Maybe you have an ugly but functional flow that you can add with minimal branding. Or maybe you have the visual design roughly set but the behaviour is still being refined. Get it to a form where it can be included - maybe that’s just a static image - and get it in there\n
  • Flag your stubs so stakeholders in demos clearly know what’s functional and/or final and what isn’t.\nWe use a class to put the stubbed element into pos:rel so that the specificity required to override it is very low - this way we don’t fuck up any prior-positioned elements. Also you can set the nodeploy folder in SVN not to be deployed on releases, so even if the stub class stays in the doc, the image won’t be, and no-one with a life will be any the wiser.\n
  • Here’s an example of one of my stubs - the behaviours weren’t defined, the js wasn’t written but for demos we put this in to stop stakeholders asking why one of the landing pages was so empty.\nNow, this can be a risky strategy. Stakeholders might see a static image and assume it works. Or they may see the ugly but functional flow and assume that’s how it’s always going to look. So it’s important to have been priming stakeholders on your approach as early as possible.\n
  • This isn’t the only strategy for dealing with UX debt – you have to work out what works best for you and your team. You could also work one day a week on UX debt, or use the last iteration as a stability rush. Other suggestions for what might constitute UX debt - Legacy Browser Support, or CSS3 enhancements; give example of MW SecondaryAction buttons\n
  • This isn’t the only strategy for dealing with UX debt – you have to work out what works best for you and your team. You could also work one day a week on UX debt, or use the last iteration as a stability rush. Other suggestions for what might constitute UX debt - Legacy Browser Support, or CSS3 enhancements; give example of MW SecondaryAction buttons\n
  • This isn’t the only strategy for dealing with UX debt – you have to work out what works best for you and your team. You could also work one day a week on UX debt, or use the last iteration as a stability rush. Other suggestions for what might constitute UX debt - Legacy Browser Support, or CSS3 enhancements; give example of MW SecondaryAction buttons\n
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  • Here are a bunch of things that either don’t have time to talk about tonight or for the most part I don’t have answers for yet. I want to answer all of these, and I hope you’ll help me do that.\n
  • Agile, as a discipline, is 10 years old this year. It’s rapidly becoming THE way that software is built. It’s not going to stop and wait for us to catch up, and it’s going to keep innovating and keep making the process leaner. We can try and keep bending our existing tools and processes around Agile, and watch as the theory and practice become ever more divergent, or we can start running to catch up. I believe we can get it right, and we should get it right, because...\n
  • ...this is what happens if we get it right.\n
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