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NetWorkShop: Boston Facilitators Roundtable

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The NetWorkShop offers a new perspective – a network lens – that sheds light on how human networks are structured and how technologies can enhance our ability to collaborate and co-create. For facilitators, it offers possibilities of new ways of thinking about client work as well as leadership coaching.
This workshop provides a clear presentation of basic network concepts, including:
·       Reflective exercises in creating and interpreting network maps of relationships (organizational and personal) using network concepts
·       An introduction to value networking analysis, with a focus on mapping roles and deliverables (gives and gets) in an organizational ecosystem
·       A short overview of how social media (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn) is altering the landscape of how people create and work in networks.

Publicada em: Negócios, Tecnologia
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NetWorkShop: Boston Facilitators Roundtable

  1. 1. NetWorkShop Patti Anklam Boston Facilitators Roundtable December 2, 2011
  2. 2. I’ve become convinced that understanding how networks work is an essential 21st century literacy. Howard Rheingold
  3. 3. Agenda• Knowledge-sharing activity• The language of networks• Networks in organizations• Networks and nonprofits• Value network analysis• Social media and personal net work 3
  4. 4. Knowledge Flows in Networks• Something you want to share• 141 characters or less• Stand up, find someone to “tweet to”• Listen to someone else’s tweet• Retweet• Repeat 4
  5. 5. http://www.dftdigest.com/images/Spyglass.jpgThe New Language of Networks
  6. 6. We live in networks all the time• We live in networks all the time: communities, organizations, teams• There is science to support the understanding of network structure• The structure of a network provides insights into how the network “works”• Once you understand the structure, you can make decisions about how to manage the network’s context• Network analysis tools help you understand the structure 6
  7. 7. The Premise: Networks Matter• The complexity of work in today’s world is such that no one can understand – let alone complete – a task alone – Individual-individual – Team-team – Company-company – Eco-system to eco-system• Strong networks are correlated with health: – People with stronger personal networks are more productive, happier, and better performers – Companies who know how to manage alliances are more flexible, adaptive and resilient – Our personal health and well-being is often tied to our social networks 7
  8. 8. Networks and Work Performance 8
  9. 9. Networks and Well-Being• In life: – People with strong networks have a better chance of full recovery from heart attacks – We are defined by the networks we are in • Obesity studies • Smokers Source: New York Times, May 22, 2008 9
  10. 10. Networks and Well-Being 10
  11. 11. The new science of networks• Beginning in the 1990’s computer science made it possible to map and analyze large social networks.• Insights became accessible to 2009 the public. 2004 2009 2002 • By 2009, network science and analysis are accepted practice 2003 in science and 2004 management 2002 11 2002
  12. 12. Network Perspective Node• If it’s a network, you can map it: – People-people – Group-group – Within organizations – Across organizations Tie• A network is a collection of entities linked by a type of relationship• All networks have common properties and can be analyzed – Information artifacts – Ideas & issues 12
  13. 13. A Classic Case 13From: The Hidden Power of Social Networks, Rob Cross and Andrew Parker, Harvard Business School Press, 2004
  14. 14. Table Activity (Page 2 of Handouts) • Take five minutes and discuss at your table • What do you see in the map on the right that might be dissonant with the organization chart? • If you were responsible for this organization, what questions would looking at this map raise for you? 14From: The Hidden Power of Social Networks, Rob Cross and Andrew Parker, Harvard Business School Press, 2004
  15. 15. A Classic Case 15From: The Hidden Power of Social Networks, Rob Cross and Andrew Parker, Harvard Business School Press, 2004
  16. 16. A Classic Case 16From: The Hidden Power of Social Networks, Rob Cross and Andrew Parker, Harvard Business School Press, 2004
  17. 17. A Classic Case 17From: The Hidden Power of Social Networks, Rob Cross and Andrew Parker, Harvard Business School Press, 2004
  18. 18. A Classic Case 18From: The Hidden Power of Social Networks, Rob Cross and Andrew Parker, Harvard Business School Press, 2004
  19. 19. It’s all about QuestionsPatterns provideinsights that provokegood questions.Full stop. 19
  20. 20. Types of metricsStructural Metrics Centrality Metrics• Look at the whole network • Look at positions of and its components: individuals in the network: – Density of interactions – Connectors – Average degree of separation – Boundary spanners – Silos or stovepiped – Isolates organizations 20
  21. 21. Types of metricsStructural Metrics Centrality Metrics• Look at the whole network • Look at positions of and its components: individuals in the network: – Density of interactions – Connectors – Average degree of separation – Boundary spanners – Silos / stovepipeds – Isolates• Good for comparing • Good for identifying groups within networks or people who are well for comparing changes in a positioned to influence the network over time network or to move information around For both the network as a whole and individuals, it is also possible to measure the diversity of the network: the extent to which people interact with people outside of their own demographics or areas of expertise. 21
  22. 22. The Unit of Analysis: The Relationship 22
  23. 23. Interpreting Results“I interact with this person twice a month I understand this person’s knowledge and or more” skills (Agree or Strongly Agree) Density: 11% Density: 28% Distance: 2.7 Distance: 1.8 23
  24. 24. Identifying Key PeopleWho are the people who are best positioned to move information through the network? 24
  25. 25. Table Activity (Page 3 of Handout)• Based on this data:• Who should Jerry appoint as his successor?• Who do you think Jerry actually appointed as his successor? Why? 25
  26. 26. Moving Into ActionWays to change patterns in Practices from the KM/OD Repertoire networksCreate more connections Make introductions through meetings and webinars, face-to-face events (like knowledge fairs); implement social software or social network referral software; social network stimulationIncrease the flow of knowledge Establish collaborative workspaces, install instant messaging systems, make existing knowledge bases more accessible and usableDiscover connections Implement expertise location and/or; discovery systems; social software; social networking applicationsDecentralize Social software; blogs, wikis; shift knowledge to the edgeConnect disconnected clusters Establish knowledge brokering roles; expand communication channelsCreate more trusted relationships Assign people to work on projects togetherAlter the behavior of individual nodes Create awareness of the impact of an individual’s place in a network; educate employees on personal knowledge networkingIncrease diversity Add nodes; connect and create networks; encourage people to bring knowledge in from their networks in the world 26
  27. 27. Organizational Networks Summary• The science of networks has brought insights into the structure of organizational networks• Organizational network analysis lets us map relationships that reveal the informal networks through which work gets done• Developing and sharing these maps helps organizations improve collaborative capacity, overcome obstacles to effective sharing, and redesign their work relationships• Results are a guide to asking good questions and should never be interpreted as an “answer” 27
  28. 28. Break 28
  29. 29. Networks and NonprofitsTraditional and Network Approaches to Grantmaker Challenges Source: Catalyzing Networks for Social Change, Monitor Institute + GEO 29
  30. 30. Mapping Task: Find Connections & Alignment Boston Green and Healthy Building Network 2005: How well do you know one another? 30From New Directions Collaborative Case Study, http://www.ndcollaborative.com/services/networks/case-studies/68-ghbn
  31. 31. Network Building Questions• What are the key tasks of network building?• What activities would you undertake to “knit this net”?• What mechanisms might you put in place? 31
  32. 32. Network Progression Connectivity Alignment Production Definition Connects people to allow Aligns people to develop Fosters joint action easy flow of and access and spread an identity and for specialized to information and collective value outcomes by aligned transactions proposition people Key task of Weaving – help people Facilitating – helping Coordinating – network meet each other, people to explore helping people plan “builder” increase ease of sharing potential shared identity and implement and searching for and value propositions collaborative actions information 32From: Net Gains – Version 1.0, Madeleine Taylor and Peter Plastrik (http://www.arborcp.com/articles/NetGainsHandbookVersion1.pdf)
  33. 33. Green & Healthy Buildings Network• Convene – In person and subsequently with mix of in-person and telecalls• Connect – Identify areas of mutual interest – Share success stories – Engage in joint problem solving• Communicate – Gives & gets – people wanting and having contacts• Coordinate – Joint meetings with city hall• Collaborate – Look for specific projects engaging multiple of the network’s members 33
  34. 34. Network Building2007: How well do you know one another? 34
  35. 35. A Design Language: Network Building• Purpose• Structure• Style• Value-producing mechanisms 35
  36. 36. VALUE NETWORK ANALYSIS
  37. 37. What is a value network?• A web of relationships that generates economic or social value through complex dynamic exchanges of both tangible and intangible benefits.• Any purposeful organization or network functions as a value network - Verna Allee http://www.valuenetworksandcollaboration.com 37
  38. 38. Mapping the Ecosystem• How does the work actually get done?• What is the value that the network or organization creates?• How efficiently is the work being done?• Where are opportunities for improving value and efficiency? 38
  39. 39. Basic elements for mapping value 39
  40. 40. Value Network Modeling Tangible (Formal)Deliverables Roles Intangible (Informal) Interactions 40© 1997-2011 Value Networks, LLC All rights reserved.
  41. 41. Shift is to focus on Roles• A role is not necessarily the same as a group, company, or function – One person or group might play 2- 3 key roles – Roles are different from job descriptions or job titles• If people are not clear about their roles, they can miss value-creating opportunities and are vulnerable to competition 41
  42. 42. …and the value exchanges among themTangible DeliverablesGoods, services, revenue (traditional value chain) –all contractual or mandated activities that directlygenerate or deal with revenue or funding.Intangible DeliverablesKnowledge and support offerings – strategic information,collaborative design, plans, processes, policy development,etc.Benefits that go beyond actual service such asexchanging business contacts, image enhancement,recognition, co-branding opportunities, etc.© 1997-2011 Value Networks, LLC All rights reserved. 42
  43. 43. Value exchanges and interactions• What are the deliverables? (Contracted or mandated?)• How does the deliverable move through the network?• What are the intangible exchanges that flow through the network? (Informal, extras?) http://www.valuenetworksandcollaboration.com/mapping/tangiblesandintangibles.html 43
  44. 44. Formal (Tangible) Deliverables Orders Proof of Concept AgResearch Revenue Commercialization Market Products Market Research Participants Commercializers AgR Developers Payments Strategic Direction Fees Payout Proof of License Concept Market Research Concept Investors Proof of Principal IP AgR Investors Ideas Strategic Direction IP Rights Research Can take up Outcomes Proposals to twelve Contract AgR years from Science Researchers Funders idea to Terms of market. Referernce© 1997-2011 Value Networks, LLC All rights reserved. 44
  45. 45. Informal Deliverables Define Collaboration Market Pull Expertise Orders Competitive Proof of Concept AgResearch Advantage Revenue Commercialization Market Products Market Research Participants Commercializers Market Feedback Opportunities AgR Developers Experts Payments Strategic Direction Credibility Market Fees Payout Proof of Pull Concept License Market Prestige Research Concept Investors Proof of Market Principal Feedback IP AgR Investors Market Validation Ideas Feedback Credibility Purpose Opportunities Strategic Capability Strategic Credibility Direction IP Rights Strategic Research Capability Outcomes Proposals Contract AgR Intangibles Science Purpose Researchers keep the Funders Public relationships Informaiton Terms of Referernce alive. Credibility Referrals© 1997-2011 Value Networks, LLC All rights reserved. 45
  46. 46. Informal Deliverables Define Collaboration Market Pull Orders Expertise Expertise Proof of AgResearch Competitive Concept Advantage Revenue Commercialization Market Products Market Research Participants Commercializers Market Feedback Opportunities AgR Developers Experts Payments Strategic Direction Credibility Market Fees Payout Proof of Pull Concept License Market Prestige Research Concept Investors Proof of Market Principal Feedback IP AgR Investors Market Validation Ideas Feedback Credibility Purpose Opportunities Strategic Capability Strategic Credibility Direction IP Rights Strategic Research Capability Outcomes Proposals Contract AgR Intangibles Science Purpose Researchers keep the Funders Public relationships Informaiton Terms of Referernce alive. Credibility Referrals© 1997-2011 Value Networks, LLC All rights reserved. 46
  47. 47. Informal Deliverables Define Collaboration Market Pull Expertise Orders Competitive Proof of Concept AgResearch Advantage Revenue Commercialization Market Products Market Research Participants Commercializers Market Feedback Opportunities AgR Developers Experts Payments Strategic Direction Credibility Market Fees Payout Proof of Pull Concept License Market Prestige Research Concept Investors Proof of Market Principal Feedback IP AgR Investors Market Validation Ideas Feedback Credibility Purpose Opportunities StrategicCredibility Strategic Direction Capability Credibility IP Rights Strategic Research Capability Outcomes Proposals Contract AgR Intangibles Science Purpose Researchers keep the Funders Public relationships Informaiton Terms of Referernce alive. Credibility Referrals © 1997-2011 Value Networks, LLC All rights reserved. 47
  48. 48. Informal Deliverables Define Collaboration Market Pull Expertise Orders CompetitiveCompetitive Advantage Proof of Concept AgResearch Advantage Revenue Commercialization Market Products Market Research Participants Commercializers Market Feedback Opportunities AgR Developers Experts Payments Strategic Direction Credibility Market Fees Payout Proof of Pull Concept License Market Prestige Research Concept Investors Proof of Market Principal Feedback IP AgR Investors Market Validation Ideas Feedback Credibility Purpose Opportunities Strategic Capability Strategic Credibility Direction IP Rights Strategic Research Capability Outcomes Proposals Contract AgR Intangibles Science Purpose Researchers keep the Funders Public relationships Informaiton Terms of Referernce alive. Credibility Referrals© 1997-2011 Value Networks, LLC All rights reserved. 48
  49. 49. Informal Deliverables Define Collaboration Market Pull Expertise Orders Competitive Proof of Concept AgResearch Advantage Revenue Commercialization Market Products Market Research Participants Commercializers Market Feedback Opportunities AgR Developers Experts Payments Strategic Direction Credibility Market Fees Payout Proof of Pull Concept License Market Prestige Research Concept Investors Proof of Market Principal Feedback IP AgR Investors Market Validation Credibility Strategic Feedback Feedback Purpose Ideas Opportunities Capability Strategic Credibility Direction IP Rights Strategic Research Capability Outcomes Proposals Contract AgR Intangibles Science Purpose Researchers keep the Funders Public relationships Informaiton Terms of Referernce alive. Credibility Referrals© 1997-2011 Value Networks, LLC All rights reserved. 49
  50. 50. ValueNet Works™ Methodology • Purpose Scope • Boundaries • Determine the level of detail Roles and • Ecosystem players participants • Stakeholders • Tangibles Transactions • Intangiblesand deliverables • Sequence • Participants and roles Analysis • Exchange analysis 50
  51. 51. Analysis• Insight level – “Aha’s” that occur through the mapping process• Exchange analysis – Looking at the structure of the network – Redundant and overlooked activities• Impact analysis/process improvements© 1997-2011 Value Networks, LLC All rights reserved. 51
  52. 52. A Big “Aha”A senior VP in the professional services arm of a large telecommunications equipmentprovider looked at this map that his executives had made and said, “That’s scary.” What’smissing? 52
  53. 53. Unnecessary transactions 53
  54. 54. Activity (Pages 4 and 5)You are designing a major change initiative for a client. What would be your ideal design for a system to support the organizations change process? 54
  55. 55. Step 1. Identify the RolesAgree on 4 or 5 majorroles in the process.Place the names of theroles on individualsticky-notesPosition these on the flipchart, trying to place theroles that will be more“central” toward themiddleAllow spacing so thatyou can draw lines thatwill not overlap 55
  56. 56. Step 2. Identify the TransactionsStart with the tangibletransactionsUsing one color ofmarker, draw lines fromone role to another andlabel the line with thename of the deliverable.Then do the intangibletransactions usinganother color pen No two-way arrows! 56
  57. 57. Summary/DeBrief (Exchange Analysis)• What is the overall purpose of the network?• What is the balance between tangible and intangible exchanges? What does the balance (or lack of balance) signify• Are there places people need to be engaged in exchanges, or offering value, but aren’t?• What would happen if roles disappeared or were combined? 57
  58. 58. How are companies using VNA? Developing a business “web”  Reconfiguring the organization  Identifying the key stakeholders and  Mergers and acquisitions relationships  Integrating new groups  Finding gaps or areas needing  Process redesign development  Develop scorecards  Ensuring that relationships and value  Target exchanges for metrics and exchanges are balanced measurement Fast Track Process Design  Evolving purposeful communities  Examine relationship among multiple  Understand transactional relationships complex relationships 58
  59. 59. VNA and ONAValue Network Analysis Organizational Network Analysis (ONA)Focused on interactions among roles Focused on relationships amongand deliverables peopleSupports improving the value created Supports improving the structuralin and for the network properties of the network to improve the flow of knowledge and ideasNodes are roles Nodes are unique entitiesLinks are transactions Links are relationshipsCan be done in a matter of hours May require survey development, analysis, specialized software 59
  60. 60. http://quilting.about.com/od/picturesofquilts/ig/Alzheimer-s-Quilts/The-Ties-that-Bind.htmPersonal Networks
  61. 61. Networks and PerformanceResearch on Top Performers shows that they: • …develop open networks to minimize insularity • …maintain balanced ties across organizational lines • …position themselves at key points in a network • …tend to invest in relationships that extend their expertise • …understand the value of networks Rob Cross, Robert J. Thomas, and David A. Light, “How Top Talent Uses Networks and Where Rising Stars Get Trapped,” Accenture Institute for High Performance Business, April 2006 61
  62. 62. Personal Networks Matter 6
  63. 63. Personal networks: the premise People who live in the intersection of socialworlds are at higher risk of having good ideas. – Ron Burt 63
  64. 64. Diversity PM NM KS MK PP AB NS RR KF DG SK RC AB DC MB BG SA PM AL GP• Organization • Social Ties• Expertise • Geographic location• Age, Tenure • Hierarchical position 64
  65. 65. Activity (Page 6)• Who is more likely to have access to new ideas? – Tom – Marion• Why? 65
  66. 66. Structural Position Matters Source: “How Top Talent Uses Networks and Where Rising Stars Get Trapped” 66
  67. 67. Personal Network: PurposeFocus Purpose How to DevelopOperational Getting work done Identify people who can efficiently block or support a projectPersonal Develop and maintain Participate in professional skills and professional reputation associations, clubs, and physical and online communitiesStrategic Figure out and obtain Identify lateral and support for future vertical relationships priorities and challenges outside your immediate control Source: “How Leaders Create and Use Networks,” Herminia Ibarra and Mark Hunter, Harvard Business Review January 2007 67
  68. 68. Social MediaPersonal SM 68
  69. 69. it’s not who you know, it’s where you know Stowe Boyd
  70. 70. Finding and making connections • Research people • Find connections • Make yourself findable •Join groups
  71. 71. Keeping track •Family, Friends, Colleagues intermixed • Easy to look up “friends in common” • Photos and videos engage • Easy to acknowledge others
  72. 72. Keeping Up Twitter keeps me in touch with people who are friends of my ideas. I know about their projects and current obsessions; they know about mine. – Jay Rosen
  73. 73. Social Learning : Expanding Your Network
  74. 74. The power of a Hashtag• Hashtag: any sequence of characters preceded by a #: – No internet service until Monday? #charter #fail• Twitter chats – Scheduled, facilitated conversations 74
  75. 75. Join a Twitter Chat#acadv A weekly chat for professional academic advisors and allthose interested in academic advising. @AcAdvChat Click for info 75
  76. 76. Social Learning : Expanding Your NetworkDiscover, Find, Follow
  77. 77. We often try to understand problems by taking apart and studying their constituent parts. But emergentproblems can’t be understood this way. Emergent systems are ones in which many different elementsinteract. The pattern of interaction then produces a new element that is greater than the sum of the parts,which then exercises a top-down influence on the constituent elements.Culture is an emergent system. A group of people establishes a pattern of interaction. And once that cultureexists, it influences how the individuals in it behave. An economy is an emergent system. So is politicalpolarization, rising health care costs and a bad marriage. Emergent systems are bottom-up and top-downsimultaneously. They have to be studied differently, as wholes and as nested networks of relationships. Westill try to address problems like poverty and Islamic extremism by trying to tease out individual causes. Wemight make more headway if we thought emergently. We often try to understand problems by taking apart You can’t manage a network; you can onlyand studying their constituent parts. But emergent problems can’t be understood this way. Emergentsystems are ones in which many different elements interact. The pattern of interaction then produces a manage its context.new element that is greater than the sum of the parts, which then exercises a top-down influence on theconstituent elements.Culture is an emergent system. A group of people establishes a pattern of interaction. And once that cultureexists, it influences how the individuals in it behave. An economy is an emergent system. So is politicalpolarization, rising health care costs and a bad marriage. Emergent systems are bottom-up and top-downsimultaneously. They have to be studied differently, as wholes and as nested networks of relationships. Westill try to address problems like poverty and Islamic extremism by trying to tease out individual causes. Wemight make more headway if we thought emergently. We often try to understand problems by taking apartand studying their constituent parts. But emergent problems can’t be understood this way. Emergentsystems are ones in which many different elements interact. The pattern of interaction then produces anew element that is greater than the sum of the parts, which then exercises a top-down influence on theconstituent elements. Culture is an emergent system. A group of people establishes a pattern of interaction.And once that culture exists, it influences how the individuals in it behave. An economy is an emergentsystem. So is political polarization, rising health care costs and a bad marriage. Emergent systems arebottom-up and top-down simultaneously. They have to be studied differently, as wholes and as nestednetworks of relationships. We still try to address problems like poverty and Islamic extremism by trying to
  78. 78. • patti@pattianklam.com •http://www.pattianklam.com •http://www.twitter.com/panklamThank you.Question 78

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