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2015 Daily Newspaper Awards Presentation

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Daily Member Awards from the 2015 SCPA News Contest

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2015 Daily Newspaper Awards Presentation

  1. 1. DAILY AWARDS DINNER Recognizing the best in S.C. newspaper journalism
  2. 2. LLLLAiken Leader & PrintingA
  3. 3. South Carolina Photo of the Year A Charleston police officer searches for a shooting suspect outside the Emanuel AME Church, in downtown Charleston, S.C. on Wednesday, June 17, 2015. A white man opened fire during a prayer meeting inside the historic black church killing several people. Matthew Fortner The Post And Courier
  4. 4. See page 8 for full NecrologySee page 8 for full Necrology Remembering Those We’ve Lost...Remembering Those We’ve Lost... William Magill “Bill” Owens Mel Derrick Ken Burger Henriette Dargan Hampton Morris Jerry Phifer McGuire
  5. 5. ENJOY DINNER!
  6. 6. Practice of pretext police stops under fire SHOTSFIRED FILE/STATT FF Graphic images of police shootings have been burned into the nation’s consciousness over the past year. Many shootings began as simple traffic stops. These violent incidents come amid a backdrop of years of frustration over officers who stop you for one thing but are really looking for another. The Post and Courier’s ongoing investigation into police shootings Inside Breaking down the data: A closer look at who gets pulled over and why. A4-5 PULLOVOO ER Every 8 minutes in North Charleston, an officer pulls someone over. Cops often do this not for traffic or safety reasons, but to find out whether you’re committing some other crime. North Charleston is the No. 1 city in South Carolina when it comes to these pretext stops. Some say this tactic is ineffective, dishonest, and that it can lead to unnecessary violence. BY TONY BARTRR ELME and GLEd NN SMITH tbartelme@postandcourier.com gsmith@postandcourier.com AA ntonioElliswasinhis2008Nis- san on Rivers Avenue one night last year when he saw the blue lights behind him. He pulled An officer ordered him to step outover. A car.“ofhisc Oneofyourheadlightsisout.” E looked at his headlights. Both werellis l on. F ur other squad cars arrived. Witho nds on the hood,his han Ellis watched an- officer search his car and find hisother o ooks and facultytextbo ID. The officers ed for a moment.huddle E anadjunctprofessoratthellis, College of Charleston, wasn’t cited for anything. “Ithoughtyourheadlightswereout,”the officersaid.Thenhewastoldhewasfree to go, though he felt anything but free. Such confrontations are known in police circles as “pretext” or “investiga- tory” stops. Officers use a minor viola- tion to stop and question someone they think might be involved in a more se- rious crime. Law enforcement officials say these stops are an important crime fighting tool. But a new Post and Courier analysis raises questions about the number of these stops and their long-term effects, especially in North Charleston. Please see POLICE,Page A4
  7. 7. GRACE BEAHM/STAFF CRADLE OF SHAME Infant mortality in South Carolina part one of four About the series TODAY: Many babies across South Carolina die at third-world levels despite the state’s lowest-ever infant mortality rate. FRIDAY: Black infants in South Carolina die at rates double and triple that of white babies. SATURDAY: Solutions to South Carolina’s lingering high death rates for newborns already are in effect in some rural counties and have brought deaths dramatically down. SUNDAY: What the state could do to reduce infant mortality in rural South Carolina. BY DOUG PARDUE and LAUREN SAUSSER The Post and Courier B abiesinabroadswathofrural South Carolina come into this world with little better chanceofsurvivalthanachildborn in war-torn Syria. They face a toxic mix of poverty, chronically sick mothers, premature birth and daunt- ing barriers to health care. The Palmetto State’s infant mortality rate hit an all-time low last year, but that achievement largely bypassed its rural corners, where infants, white and black, still die at third-world rates, a five-month Post and Courier investigation has found. In these rural counties,morethan200 newborns have died on average during each of the last three years, many from preventable problems. Thesestrugglingcommunitiesremain largely untouched by a four-year state campaign to stop babies from dying unnecessarydeaths. Thestate provides relatively little money to support some of the most promising infant death-prevention efforts. And those programs are unavailable in some counties that need the most help. South Carolina has long ranked among the deadliest states for newborns. Since 2000, 6,696 South Carolinababieshavediedbefore their first birthday. Born to face third-world death rates Please see INFANTS,Page A7 Many newborns arrive in struggling corners of the Palmetto State where race, poverty and other factors contribute to a startling toll POSTANDCOURIER.COM Charleston, S.C. $1.00Thursday, March 12, 2015 T H E S O U T H ’ S O LD E S T DAI LY N E W S PAPE R FO U N D E D 18 03
  8. 8. Frequent flier Rep. Alan Clemmons $14,700 OntripsincludingIsrael andNewOrleans Please see MONEY,Page A7 Gas guzzler Sen. Kent M. Williams $20,200 Oftengassedup hisSUVtwoorthree timesaweeksince2009 Doyoubelievelawmak-kk ersshouldbeallowedto writeandenforceethics rulesformembersofthe legislature?Gotopostandcourier. com/pollstovote. To search the data and to read more, go to postandcourier. com/capitol-gains. Rules allow S.C. Gov. Haley to enjoy free passes to col- lege games, A7 The political ATM: what they spent, A8 Is lawmakers’ pay enough to live on? A9 Poll Online Inside GiftsG At least $177,000 spent by legislative campaigns on gifts ranging from flowers for birthdays to Christmas ornaments, jewelry and silk neckties GasG At least $139,000 spent by legislative campaigns on gas. FlightsF At least $110,000 was spent by legislative campaigns on flights, including baggage fees and travel insurance. Senate Santa Sen. Hugh Leatherman $109,000 In presents, mostly items labeled “constituent gifts” or Christmas ornaments Business Lawmakers spent tens of thousands of dollars in campaign cash to hire each other’s companies for consulting services, print jobs and more. Family man Rep. Rick Quinn $105,000 In work he sent to his or his father’s companies FILE/AP SPECIAL REPORT CAPITOL GAINS Ethics laws are supposed to prevent South CarolinaEE candidates and elected officials from using their public positions for personal gain. So why did they go hunting and buy God Pros, a used BMW and male enhancementW pills? An investigation by TheTT Post and Courier and CenterPP for Public Integrity exposes the cash machine candidates and elected officials have at their fingertips. BY TONY BARTELME and Rd ACHEL BAYEAA tbartelme@postandcourier.com rbaye@publicintegrity.org S outh Carolina elected officials and candi- dateshavewhatamountstoapersonalATMAA that dispensed nearly $100 million since 2009 for such things as car repairs, football tickets, male-enhancement pills, GoPro cameras, overseas junkets and gasoline. A joint investigation by The Post and Courier andtheCenterforPublicIntegrityalsofoundstate lawmakers and candidates used this cash machine to hire their own companies, pay parking tickets, purchase an AARP membership — and even buy a used BMW convertible for “parades.” The money funding this political cash machine comesfromcandidates’campaignaccounts,reim- bursements from state government and outright gifts from special interests. Theinnerworkingsofthiscashnetworktypically remain hidden unless prosecutors subpoena ques- tionable receipts and other evidence locked away from public view, as happened in the case of ex- House Speaker Bobby Harrell. TheRepublican’sconvictionlastyearformisusing campaign money to pay for his private plane left
  9. 9. BY ANDREW KNAPP and Td ONY BARTRR ELME aknapp@postandcourier.com tbartelme@postandcourier.com A blink of an eye takes about four- tenths of a second. From the first shot to the last, the shooting of WalterWW L. Scott took 2.7 seconds. Seven blinks. Thisbriefmomentintimewouldhave acascadingeffect:Scottgrabbedhisleft sideandcrumpledface-firstontoapatch of grass; Michael T. Slager, the North Charlestonpoliceofficerwhoshothim, loweredhispistol;FeidinSantana,onhis way to work, finished capturing it all on his phone camera, video that would bring these seconds to the world. But that 2.7-second space in time is deceptive. Expertsinofficer-involvedshootings say they usually happen after a chain of events, each link leading to another until the one where an officer decides to pull the trigger. 2.7 seconds How 8 bullets pierced the nation Please see SECONDS,Page A9
  10. 10. INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING OpenDivision HONORABLE MENTION: The Sun News Issac J. Bailey
  11. 11. INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING OpenDivision THIRD PLACE: The Post and Courier Doug Pardue and Lauren Sausser GRACE BEAHM/STAFF CRADLE OF SHAME Infant mortality in South Carolina part one of four About the series TODAY: Many babies across South Carolina die at third-world levels despite the state’s lowest-ever infant mortality rate. FRIDAY: Black infants in South Carolina die at rates double and triple that of white babies. SATURDAY: Solutions to South Carolina’s lingering high death rates for newborns already are in effect in some rural counties and have brought deaths dramatically down. SUNDAY: What the state could do to reduce infant mortality in rural South Carolina. BY DOUG PARDUE and LAUREN SAUSSER The Post and Courier B abiesinabroadswathofrural South Carolina come into this world with little better chanceofsurvivalthanachildborn in war-torn Syria. They face a toxic mix of poverty, chronically sick mothers, premature birth and daunt- ing barriers to health care. The Palmetto State’s infant mortality rate hit an all-time low last year, but that achievement largely bypassed its rural corners, where infants, white and black, still die at third-world rates, a five-month Post and Courier investigation has found. In these rural counties,morethan200 newborns have died on average during each of the last three years, many from preventable problems. Thesestrugglingcommunitiesremain largely untouched by a four-year state campaign to stop babies from dying unnecessarydeaths. Thestate provides relatively little money to support some of the most promising infant death-prevention efforts. And those programs are unavailable in some counties that need the most help. South Carolina has long ranked among the deadliest states for newborns. Since 2000, 6,696 South Carolinababieshavediedbefore their first birthday. Born to face third-world death rates Please see INFANTS,Page A7 Many newborns arrive in struggling corners of the Palmetto State where race, poverty and other factors contribute to a startling toll POSTANDCOURIER.COM Charleston, S.C. $1.00Thursday, March 12, 2015 T H E S O U T H ’ S O LD E S T DAI LY N E W S PAPE R FO U N D E D 18 03
  12. 12. INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING OpenDivision SECOND PLACE: The Post and Courier Lauren Sausser BY LAUREN SAUSSER lsausser@postandcourier.com A n untold number of foster children in South Caro- lina custody are neglected, drugged, beaten and molested in group homes and institutions where the state warehouses them formillionsofdollarsayearattax- payer expense. What’s more, South Carolina keeps the abuse these children suf- fer secret by using state laws that shield group homes from almost any scrutiny. Courtrecordsshedlightonsome of the worst cases, but this state- sanctioned secrecy makes it im- possible for the public to weigh the differencebetweenwell-rungroup homes and those that resemble a Dickensian orphanage. Even par- ents who reluctantly send their childrentothesefacilitiesfortreat- ment can’t figure out how to keep them safe behind closed doors. WhenJessicaFreemanplacedher daughter in Springbrook Behav- ioral Health last year, she had no idea the state had investigated the Greenville County home 95 times since 2000 for possible abuse and neglect — more than almost any other residential treatment facility in South Carolina. That’s because thestateDepartmentofSocialSer- vices doesn’t make the few records that are public readily accessible. Freeman pulled her daughter Warehousing our children South Carolina laws hide child abuse inside group homes A POST AND COURIER INVESTIGATION PAUL ZOELLER/STAFF The Jenkins Institute for Children, located in North Charleston, is one of more than 100 group homes and institutions in South Carolina that accept foster children from the Department of Social Services. A federal lawsuit filed earlier this year against the state agency alleges that a teenager at Jenkins was asked to take nude pictures of herself by an adult there. The director for the facility denied those claims. BRAD NETTLES/STAFF Charleston County School teacher Jeremy Wise teaches English literature to children at Windwood Farm. The group home for boys in Awendaw offers an on-site school for children in its care. Many of the children have been shuffled around several group homes and foster homes by the Department of Social Services. ABOUT THE SERIES Today South Carolina sends its youngest foster children into group homes and institutions at a higher rate than any other state, and the public has no way to know whether they’re safe. Saturday State taxpayers spend millions of dollars every year on group homes, even though some ex- perts say this industry is unsafe for many chil- dren. Sunday As other states have re- duced their reliance on group care for children, an effort in South Caro- lina to pull children with behavioral health issues from institutions may not work.Please see HOMES,Page A6
  13. 13. INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING OpenDivision FIRST PLACE: The Post and Courier Staff Frequent flier Rep. Alan Clemmons $14,700 OntripsincludingIsrael andNewOrleans Please see MONEY,Page A7 Gas guzzler Sen. Kent M. Williams $20,200 Oftengassedup hisSUVtwoorthree timesaweeksince2009 Doyoubelievelawmak-kk ersshouldbeallowedto writeandenforceethics rulesformembersofthe legislature?Gotopostandcourier. com/pollstovote. To search the data and to read more, go to postandcourier. com/capitol-gains. Rules allow S.C. Gov. Haley to enjoy free passes to col- lege games, A7 The political ATM: what they spent, A8 Is lawmakers’ pay enough to live on? A9 Poll Online Inside GiftsG At least $177,000 spent by legislative campaigns on gifts ranging from flowers for birthdays to Christmas ornaments, jewelry and silk neckties GasG At least $139,000 spent by legislative campaigns on gas. FlightsF At least $110,000 was spent by legislative campaigns on flights, including baggage fees and travel insurance. Senate Santa Sen. Hugh Leatherman $109,000 In presents, mostly items labeled “constituent gifts” or Christmas ornaments Business Lawmakers spent tens of thousands of dollars in campaign cash to hire each other’s companies for consulting services, print jobs and more. Family man Rep. Rick Quinn $105,000 In work he sent to his or his father’s companies FILE/AP SPECIAL REPORT CAPITOL GAINS Ethics laws are supposed to prevent South CarolinaEE candidates and elected officials from using their public positions for personal gain. So why did they go hunting and buy God Pros, a used BMW and male enhancementW pills? An investigation by TheT Post and Courier and CenterPP for Public Integrity exposes the cash machine candidates and elected officials have at their fingertips. BY TONY BARTELME and Rd ACHEL BAYEAA tbartelme@postandcourier.com rbaye@publicintegrity.org S outh Carolina elected officials and candi- dateshavewhatamountstoapersonalATMAA that dispensed nearly $100 million since 2009 for such things as car repairs, football tickets, male-enhancement pills, GoPro cameras, overseas junkets and gasoline. A joint investigation by The Post and Courier andtheCenterforPublicIntegrityalsofoundstate lawmakers and candidates used this cash machine to hire their own companies, pay parking tickets, purchase an AARP membership — and even buy a used BMW convertible for “parades.” The money funding this political cash machine comesfromcandidates’campaignaccounts,reim- bursements from state government and outright gifts from special interests. Theinnerworkingsofthiscashnetworktypically remain hidden unless prosecutors subpoena ques- tionable receipts and other evidence locked away from public view, as happened in the case of ex- House Speaker Bobby Harrell. TheRepublican’sconvictionlastyearformisusing campaign money to pay for his private plane left
  14. 14. SERIES OF SPORTS ARTICLES OpenDivision HONORABLE MENTION: The Island Packet Stephen Fastenau, David Lauderdale and Gina Smith
  15. 15. SERIES OF SPORTS ARTICLES OpenDivision THIRD PLACE: The State David Cloninger
  16. 16. SERIES OF SPORTS ARTICLES OpenDivision SECOND PLACE: The Herald Bret McCormick Buffets are the worst for Win- throp women’s basketball coach Kevin Cook. In a buffet line, balancing a plate in one hand and spooning up food with the other, the 54-year-old Ohio native is unable to hide the quaking tremors that rattle his hands. Plane rides are also diffi- cult, especially for the neighbor- ing passenger, and it’s nearly im- possible for Cook to sleep. Since the illness was diagnosed in 2007, Parkinson’s disease has become a dominating blight on Cook’s life. In an effort to stop the tremors, Cook decided in November – after considerable discussion with his wife of four years, Francine – to undergo an operation called deep brain stimulation. On April 1, Cook’s head was immobilized and four holes were drilled into his skull. He was completely con- scious as doctors implanted an electrode in the top left half of his brain. Step two of the process was completed last Wednesday. A hair- thin fiber extension was inserted under his skin, attached to the electrode and run down his neck and under the collarbone. There, it was attached to what’s called an IPG, an implantable pulse gener- ator. That’s essentially a pacemak- er that will provide electricity to the electrode in Cook’s brain. The IPG sits beneath a brand new three-inch diagonal scar on the left side of his chest. On April 28, Cook will be “turned on,” as he calls it. A re- mote control will initiate the IPG. And Cook’s tremors should stop. “Getting here to the 28th is gon- na be a long wait,” said the long- time basketball coach last week. Cook’s Parkinson’s symptoms surfaced before he was officially diagnosed in 2007. While the tremors are the most noticeable aspect of the illness, there are so many other leech-like symptoms. Sitting on a leather sofa next to his mother, Ruthie, Cook said that rigidity and soreness are two of the worst. Additionally, he has pain in his left hip that never seems to go away, and he usually gets two to three hours of sleep per night. That’s bad even for a college basketball coach. Parkinson’s, Cook said, “is always on the attack.” Cook, who has coached wom- en’s basketball all over the world and at all levels, was able to par- tially stave off the onset of Parkin- son’s when he lived in Washing- ton, D.C. – where he met and mar- ried Francine – by participating in hot yoga. The steamy, hour-long sessions unwound his body and mind, and stress would exit as buckets of sweat. But as Cook’s symptoms have in- Winthrop’s Cook hopes to calm Parkinson’s symptoms - JEFF SOCHKO Winthrop women’s basketball coach Kevin Cook applauds during a 2013 game. Cook recently under- went a procedure to help minimize symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. COACH UNDERGOING PROCEDURE TO EASE TREMORS By Bret McCormick bmccormick@heraldonline.com SEE COOK, PAGE 6A
  17. 17. SERIES OF SPORTS ARTICLES OpenDivision FIRST PLACE: The Island Packet Kendall Salter and Gina Smith
  18. 18. CARTOON OpenDivision SECOND PLACE: The Greenville News Roger Harvell
  19. 19. CARTOON OpenDivision FIRST PLACE: The State Robert Ariail
  20. 20. MIXED MEDIA ILLUSTRATION OpenDivision HONORABLE MENTION: The Post and Courier Chad Dunbar
  21. 21. MIXED MEDIA ILLUSTRATION OpenDivision THIRD PLACE: The Post and Courier Chad Dunbar ARTS&CULTURE Music Page F6 Dance Page F6 Visual arts Page F7 Film Page F7 Theater Page F8 previewFall arts BY ADAM PARKER aparker@postandcourier.com T he array of offerings in the Charleston area grows each year. The Holy City recently has added a small auditioned choir called the King’s Counterpoint, gained a new ensemble called the Charleston Wind Symphony and em- braced masters of stagecraft at 34 West The- ater Company and the Charleston Perform- ing Arts Center. The Sparrow in North Charleston has be- come a great destination for live rock ’n’ roll. Charleston Supported Art, now in its third year, is bringing visual artists and collectors together in innovative ways. Arts organizations that have been around awhile are trying new things. Midtown Productions opened a cabaret theater in North Charleston. The Halsey Institute has insinuated itself into the realm of concerts and movies. The College of Charleston music programs have streamlined while boosting their quality. And Crabtree Players moved from the Isle of Palms to a strip mall on John- nie Dodds Boulevard in Mount Pleasant. The Charleston Music Hall has stepped up its game, keeping the lights on most nights and presenting all sorts of fine musicians, lo- cal and national. And now that the renewed Gaillard Center is about to open, Charleston audiences will gain access to another tier of performers. So much is on tap during the 2015-16 sea- son it’s impossible to give full credit where credit is due. But The Post and Courier will attempt to provide the most up-to-date list- Things to see, hear and do this fall in the Lowcountry Please see FALL,Page F8 IMAGE FROM “IN THE SPIRIT OF GULLAH,” BY 2006 MOJA ARTS FESTIVAL POSTER ARTIST, DOYLE CLOYD AND GRAPHIC BY CHAD DUNBAR/STAFF Full calendar listings online at www.postandcourier.com/events Inside Warren Peper, F2 Books, F4 Travel, F5
  22. 22. MIXED MEDIA ILLUSTRATION OpenDivision SECOND PLACE: The Post and Courier Brandon Lockett FACINGTHE FUTURE FUTUREISLANDSREFLECTSONSUCCESS ASBANDHEADSTOWARDCHARLESTONPAGES24-25 SEASEASSONSTARTERONSTARTER RRIVERDOGSREADYTORUMBLE PPAGES18-19 WELCOMES HOME 25TH ANNUAL FOLLY BEACH SEAAND SAND FESTIVAL APRIL11 2015APRIL11,2015 FOLLYBEACHFOLLYBEACH PAGES12-15
  23. 23. MIXED MEDIA ILLUSTRATION OpenDivision FIRST PLACE: The Post and Courier Luke Reasoner FOOTBALL 2015 PREVIEW Inside
  24. 24. ILLUSTRATION OpenDivision HONORABLE MENTION: Morning News Justin Johnson
  25. 25. ILLUSTRATION OpenDivision THIRD PLACE: The Island Packet Drew Martin
  26. 26. ILLUSTRATION OpenDivision SECOND PLACE: Morning News Justin Johnson
  27. 27. ILLUSTRATION OpenDivision FIRST PLACE: The Post and Courier Brandon Lockett 2015 James Beard Awards Charleston has three nominees for national James Beard Foundation Awards this year, one for chef and two for wine. The winners will be announced tonight at a Chicago gala. 38,000 Number of entries for restaurant and chef awards last year. Want to watch? Live streaming at jamesbeard.org/awards beginning at 7 p.m. Or, follow Post and Courier Food Editor Hanna Raskin onTwitter at @hannaraskin. Outstanding Chef Fun facts THISYEAR’S NOMINEES Outstanding Wine THISYEAR’S NOMINEES Michael Anthony CITY: NYC CUISINE: Contemporary American PREVIOUS NOMINATIONS: 1 FRIED CHICKEN ON THE MENU? Yes. Suzanne Goin CITY: Los Angeles CUISINE: Contemporary American PREVIOUS NOMINATIONS: 6 FRIED CHICKEN ON THE MENU? Yes. Donald Link CITY: New Orleans CUISINE: Regional American PREVIOUS NOMINATIONS: 1 FRIED CHICKEN ON THE MENU? Yes. MarcVetri CITY: Philadelphia CUISINE: Italian PREVIOUS NOMINATIONS: 1 FRIED CHICKEN ON THE MENU? Yes. Sean Brock CITY: Charleston CUISINE: Regional American PREVIOUS NOMINATIONS: 2 FRIED CHICKEN ON THE MENU?Yes. A16 CITY: San Francisco NUMBER OF BOTTLES: 500 FIG CITY: Charleston NUMBER OF BOTTLES: 130 McCrady’s CITY: Charleston NUMBER OF BOTTLES: 540 Bern’s CITY:Tampa NUMBER OF BOTTLES: 6,800 Spago CITY: Beverly Hills NUMBER OF BOTTLES: 3,600 81% of winners were men. SOUTH MIDWEST NORTHWEST SOUTHWEST WEST SOUTHEAST GREAT LAKES MID-ATLANTIC NORTHEAST 56% of winners came from NYC. 0% of winners came from the Southeast.Previouswinners,onaverage,had atleastone previousnomination. Whilehavingfriedchickenon themenuhasneverbeforebeena requirementforOutstandingChef winners,it’sexpectednow– all2015winnersdo. Winnershave anaverageof 2cookbooks. Did you know? SOUTH MIDWEST NORTHWEST SOUTHWEST WEST SOUTHEAST GREAT LAKES MID-ATLANTIC NORTHEAST 53% of winners came from NYC. 0% of winners came from the Southeast. 13% Winnerswith previousnominations. Wine list Numberofbottlesat winningrestaurants* Nominations Region Gender Since 2000, data indicates the odds of winning the OutstandingWine category. 2,000 -3,000 (27%) 1,000-2,000 (18%) Below1,000 (36%) 3,000andup (18%) What history has shown us Nominations *data not available for 4 restaurants Since 2000, data indicates the odds of winning the Outstanding Chef category. (Note: 2013 produced two winners in a tie.)What history has shown us
  28. 28. INFORMATIONAL GRAPHICS PORTFOLIO OpenDivision HONORABLE MENTION: The State Elissa Macarin SOURCE: ACCUWEATHER.COM Southeastern drought Carolinas, Georgia drier than normal Minor Moderate Severe Birmingham Atlanta Tallahassee Columbia Charleston Myrtle Beach Charlotte Hilton Head 2016 IS ALREADY HERE FOR EARLY PRIMARY STATES Trump (R) Walker (R) Cruz (R) Clinton (D) Sanders (D) Biden (D) Bush (R) Kasich (R) Fiorina (R) Carson (R) Rubio (R) Iowa REPUBLICANS Donald Trump leads the polls in all three major early primary states, but his advantage is slimmest in Iowa. A solid win in Iowa, a state dominated by traditionalist voters, could boost the New York business mogul’s chances as he moves forward to states where he enjoys stronger support. But Iowa has favored social conservatives in recent caucuses – Mike Huckabee in 2008 and Rick Santorum in 2012. That makes the Hawkeye State vital for Scott Walker, the governor of neighboring Wisconsin and a values candidate who can- not afford to falter out of the gate. The son of a Baptist preacher has seen his poll num- bers dip in the past month amid Trump’s surge, taking Walker from the lead and out of the top three. Also looking for a shot of life out of Iowa is Ted Cruz, Trump’s closest ally in the field. Another candidate courting social conservatives, the Texas senator has risen to third in the Iowa polls. DEMOCRATS Hillary Clinton can start putting an end to the Bernie Sanders phenomenon with a strong showing in the state that derailed her 2008 presidential bid, when she finished third behind Barack Obama and John Edwards. Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont, has been drawing large crowds and closing the gap with Clinton as ques- tions linger about her use of a private email server while she was secretary of state. Meanwhile, Vice President Joe Biden’s Iowa poll numbers are rising amid spec- ulation that he will launch a 2016 run. New Hampshire REPUBLICANS Jeb Bush will hope for traction in the early primary state known for backing the GOP’s more mainstream candi- dates. The Granite State helped John McCain and Mitt Romney mount comebacks that led to their winning the GOP nominations in 2008 and 2012, respectively. With or without a strong Trump chal- lenge, Bush will need to win in New Hampshire after an expected struggle in Iowa. The former Florida governor could use a New Hampshire victory to build momentum toward South Car- olina, where his family has enjoyed strong support over the years. John Kasich, another more moder- ate candidate, could get a boost in New England. The Ohio governor is leading Bush in recent polls, though they both trail Trump. But Kasich could be a one- hit early primary wonder. He sits 10th in the Iowa and S.C. polls. New Hampshire also could be the where Carly Fiorina makes some noise. She’s fourth in the polls. The question is whether the former Hewlett Packard boss can carry any momentum into the later contests. DEMOCRATS If Vermonter Sanders wants to stay in the conversation for the nomination, he must win the state next door. He has passed Clinton in New Hampshire polls. How long the talk about Sanders lasts after New Hampshire depends on Clin- ton looking like a lock in South Car- olina. She does now. South Carolina REPUBLICANS Few voters would have expected Ben Carson to reach second place in S.C. polls when the primary season heated up. Could the retired neurosurgeon be this year’s Newt Gingrich – the former U.S. House speaker who upended the party favorite here in 2012? S.C. GOP primary voters seemingly crave political outsiders. Trump and Carson have the backing from nearly half of likely S.C. primary voters in recent polls. But 2016’s third vote could be where Marco Rubio needs to break out if he wants to make his mark on the race. The U.S. senator from Florida’s team includes S.C. political veterans, which should help. But he needs to get mov- ing. Rubio is seventh in S.C. polling. DEMOCRATS Clinton holds a huge S.C. lead, but let’s go with a “what-if” here. If Biden enters the race, South Carolina likely will be where he could do the most early damage. Consider Biden’s ties in the state. He helped raise money for S.C. Democratic gubernatorial challenger Vincent She- heen last year. He spoke at the state party’s big fundraiser a few years back. He flew to Columbia to tout a White House economic program last year. He vacations on Kiawah Island. Some in the party, who already call Biden South Carolina’s third U.S. sen- ator, really want a viable alternative to Clinton. Why not Joe? FROM PAGE 1A ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2016 presidential primary dates Note: Some dates are tentative FEB. 1 Iowa (Democratic and Republican) FEB. 9 New Hampshire (Democratic and Republican) FEB. 20 South Carolina (Republican), Nevada (Democratic) FEB. 23 Nevada (Republican) FEB. 27 South Carolina (Democratic) MARCH 1 Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont and Virginia (Democratic and Republican); Alaska (Republican) MARCH 5 Kansas and Louisiana (Democratic and Republican); Nebraska (Democratic); Kentucky (Republican) MARCH 6 Maine (Democratic) MARCH 8 Michigan and Mississippi (Democratic and Republican); Hawaii (Republican) MARCH 15 Florida, Illinois, Missouri, North Carolina and Ohio (Democratic and Republican) MARCH 22 Arizona and Utah (Democratic and Republican); Idaho (Democratic) MARCH 26 Alaska, Hawaii and Washington (Democratic) APRIL 5 Wisconsin (Democratic and Republican) APRIL 9 Wyoming (Democratic) APRIL 19 New York (Democratic and Republican) APRIL 26 Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island (Democratic and Republican) MAY 3 Indiana (Democratic and Republican) MAY 10 West Virginia (Democratic and Republican); Nebraska (Republican) MAY 17 Oregon (Democratic and Republican); Kentucky (Democratic) JUNE 7 California, Montana, New Jersey New Mexico and South Dakota (Democratic and Republican); North Dakota (Democratic) JUNE 14 District of Columbia (Democratic and Republican) .............................................. ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... S.C. primary schedule FALL (DATE TBA) Voters can start applying for absentee ballots JAN. 6 Deadline to mail military and overseas absentee ballots JAN. 27 Deadline to register to vote in the S.C. presidential primaries FEB. 16 5 p.m. deadline to submit absentee ballot applications by mail for the Republican primary FEB. 19 5 p.m. deadline to vote absentee in person for the Republican primary FEB. 20 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Republican presidential primary; mailed absentee ballots due at 7 p.m. FEB. 23 5 p.m. deadline to submit absentee ballot applications by mail for the Democratic primary FEB. 26 5 p.m. deadline to vote absentee in person for the Democratic primary FEB. 27 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Democratic presidential primary; mailed absentee ballots due at 7 p.m. .......................................... , regulators say more ee dozen dams in South a failed after the torrent. st 17 of those were in d County, many in the eek watershed that runs Forest Acres and Co- In addition to the dam Lake, dams also blew Upper Rockyford and Rockyford lakes, as well mes Pond on Fort Jack- e Pine Tree Dam, which gulated by the state, ed, sending water down Creek to Cary Lake. rty owners where dams y they miss the placid hat kept their property p, while providing pla- ayak, fish or just enjoy w. ands of people live on a f residential lakes from st Richland County to ort Jackson. The lakes centerpieces of their rhoods, where towns – Lakes, Forest Acres – ir names from their dings. s, however, see the d their failed or totter- s as a threat to thou- ore who live down- Y CONCERNS FOR DOWNSTREAM including some lake- perty owners, want any at are rebuilt to be up so they can better nd future floods. breaks are suspected of ting to flooding that er rising inside homes ing’s Grant neighbor- d in the Lake Katherine s well as washing out Decker Boulevard, Gar- ry Road and Lower Boulevard. d ld mate is changing and more frequent storms, such as the one that recently hit Columbia, are expected, he said. “We want to make sure peo- l h li d eastern regional director. Jobsis pre- dicted it could take months to sort out all the issues that resulted from the broken dams in the Colum- bia area. His group may weigh in on some requests to rebuild dams, although Jobsis said it is too l t k state is signaling that dam regulation will be a higher priority. Thursday, it ordered the lakes behind more than 60 dams statewide drained or low- ered by Tuesday until engineers can certify their safety. Many of the dams in the Gills Creek watershed likely were constructed 50 to 100 years ago out of what some engineers say were inferior materials. Taller dams with more clay and better compaction might hold up bet- ter in the future, they say. Owens’ next-door neighbor, Catherine Cook, said she un- derstands arguments for stron- ger dams. She also said lakes should be managed in a coor- dinated way so that water can b l d ffi i tl b f seems like they should be coordinated to alleviate this massive rush of water on our neighbors downstream,” she said. REBUILDING A BETTER DAM? NEED A NEW PERMIT How quickly a dam could be rebuilt – and to what standard – depends on the government agency overseeing the work. Officials with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said dams already permitted by that agen- cy could be rebuilt to the same standard without any further approval from the Corps. But anyone wanting to re- build a dam to a higher, stur- dier standard likely would need a Corps permit. That could take months to receive, officials acknowledged last week. “If they are going to put it back exactly as it was, they are already covered under their old permit,” Corps spokeswoman Glenn Jeffries said. “If they decide, ‘Hey I’m going to make this a little better, I want to enhance it, I want to change it,’ then you need a permit.” Th C ld i f t PAGE 1A KES
  29. 29. INFORMATIONAL GRAPHICS PORTFOLIO OpenDivision THIRD PLACE: The Greenville News Jeff Ruble ROAD TAX FOUND BACKERS IN CITY Mayor says Greenville will ask General Assembly for power to hold referendum on tax inside city lines, where it has a chance to succeed SUPPORT FOR THE ROAD TAX Less than 30% 30-40% 40-45% 45-50% More than 50% A majority of voters across the county and in every municipality opposed the one- cent sales tax increase for road, bridge and pedestrian transportation improvements. But patterns of support emerge from a precinct-by-precinct analysis. The narrative has been clear since the crushing defeat of the sales tax for roads: Greenville County voters didn’t want it, by a 2-to-1 margin, and don’t appear to have an ap- petite for another go at it anytime in the fore- seeable future. In the county, in every municipality, in a majority of voting precincts, the penny sales tax that would have provided $673 million to fix the area’s substandard infrastructure failed. However, a closer look into the results, pre- cinct-by-precinct, reveals another theme. An analysis of election results by The Greenville News reveals an urban-minded core whose fate is tied to the wishes of its far- ther-flung rural neighbors, based on the sim- ple fact that Greenville County is, well … a By Eric Connor and Robbie Ward Staff Writers Support was weakest in northern and southern portions of the county, including the Skyland precinct where 85.7% of voters opposed it. Voters in 10 precincts, mostly near downtown and all but one within the city of Greenville, supported the sales tax increase. The vote came close to passing in precincts along the corridor of congested Woodruff Road, particularly at points where motorists spend the most time sitting in traffic. See ROADS, Page 5A Farrell Villarreal’s online profiles along with interviews of people who knew him both online and in person sketch a portrait of a 22-year-old man who police allege is behind the act of vio- lence along one of the region’s busiest corridors. The picture that emerges by way of interviews with friends, family, ac- quaintances and authorities is of a young man who voiced violent thoughts, de- spised the government and police and sometimes imagined himself an assas- sin. It’s a story of fabricated “safe houses,” private Facebook messages about home-built silencers, and a 17- year-old girl in south Georgia whom Far- rell Villarreal went to see when he set off hitchhikingChristmasEvearound5a.m. BY TONYA MAXWELL AND ANNA LEE | STAFF WRITERS Friends, acquaintances of accused I-85 killer fear warning signs were missed See SLAYING, Page 15A ONLINE, REAL WORLDS COLLIDE SHOT AND LEFT FOR DEAD FOR SIX DAYS LAW OFFICERS SEARCHED FOR THIS CAR, a missing clue in a perplexing homicide along Interstate 85 in Anderson County. ¶ And now, here it was. Parked along a rural stretch of road outside Belton. ¶ Behind the wheel sat John Asher Farrell Villarreal, who told an inquiring deputy that he knew the people in the house at the end of the long driveway. ¶ The residents inside weren’t as committed: They said they only knew the guy from Facebook. T he truth is, the thin ice that Greenville per- petually skates on when it comes keeping mi- nor-league hockey in town could have cracked this week — and, ultimately, it might still. The wealthy Maryland executive who swooped in three years ago to save the Greenville Road Warriors from calling it quits announced this week he intends to do what no one has been able to — make hockey work here — and he signed a new, five- year lease to prove he believes what he’s selling. But it would have been of little surprise if the an- nouncement had been that hockey in Greenville was done for — yet again. The team loses money each year. Fan attendance is at the bottom end of the league. Potential big-name sponsors, unsure of the team’s future, are wary of long-term commitment. Meanwhile, the publicly owned Bon Secours Well- ness Arena depends on those dead-of-winter game nights — in ways beyond the minimal income hockey generates — to help meet millions in debt obligations that taxpayers were committed to nearly two dec- ades ago to build it. The margins are thin for a 15,000-seat venue that, like others of its time around the turn of the new mil- FOR 15,000-SEAT VENUE, BENEFITS OF MINOR-LEAGUE HOCKEY GO BEYOND REVENUE By Eric Connor Staff writer, econnor@greenvillenews.com See ARENA, Page 4A
  30. 30. INFORMATIONAL GRAPHICS PORTFOLIO OpenDivision SECOND PLACE: The State Meredith Sheffer C O L U M B I A ɀ S O U T H C A R O L I N A FRIDAY, JUNE 5, 2015 ɀ WWW.THESTATE.COM ɀ SECTION B SPORTS IN BUSINESS: ROSEWOOD MARKET HAS A NEW OWNER B7 COLLEGE BASEBALL: SUPER REGIONALS START FRIDAY B6 WHO’S THE BEST PHARAOH? Pharaohs seem to be everywhere this days. USC wide receiver Pharoh (the spelling preferred by his parents) Cooper is making preseason All-America teams. The horse American Pharoah (mis- spelled by a fan in a naming contest) is trying to become the first Triple Crown winner since 1978. And, of course, to many, Yul Brynner – who played Ra- messes II in “The Ten Commandments” – always will be the most famous Egyptian pharaoh. A look at the trio: I t seems a new survey comes out every week, announcing rankings for America’s cities and states on any number of topics from weight to walkability, romance to jobs and just about everything in between. Now, let’s face it, most of these surveys don’t seem terribly scientific. And in the grand scheme of things, the findings mean little more than bragging rights. Still, it’s fun to see how the Palmetto State and its cities stack up against the rest of the United States. So, just to entertain ourselves during this rather hot week, we decided to pull together a few rankings from surveys conducted by a variety of organizations over the past couple of years. See how many you agree – or disagree – with. THE STATE Among the 50 U.S. states, South Carolina ranks: 1Best for doctors 1Patriotism 5Most religious 50Safest states to live 8Hottest 3Best for doing business 2People moving in from other states 28Eco-friendly 40 Happiest 29 Business startup activity 10Fastest- growing 8Best to be a taxpayer 36Senior health 40 Puppy-loving states 32Economic outlook (2015) 24 Population 40 Land area 21Water area 45 Best for women 40 Best school systems 42 Overall health 10Adult obesity CITIES How South Carolina’s cities rank against U.S. cities: 2Myrtle Beach’s rank, 20 fastest-growing metro areas 13Columbia’s rank, 14 best SEC college towns 3Myrtle Beach’s rank, 20 trashiest spring break destinations 49 Myrtle Beach’s rank, 100 highest- appreciating cities 8Columbia’s ranking, 100 metro areas with largest weight problems 13Hilton Head’s rank, 20 fastest-growing metro areas 17 Charleston/North Charleston’s rank, 20 fastest-growing metro areas 10Greenville’s rank, 10 best city parks (Falls Park on the Reedy) 16Daufuskie Island’s rank, 16 sexiest beaches 8Clemson’s rank, top 25 college football towns 7 Hilton Head Island’s rank, 10 best beaches 4 Greenville’s rank, 10 best downtowns 9 Greenville’s rank, 11 top barbecue cities 1Greenville’s rank, 10 best urban bike paths (Swamp Rabbit Trail) Survey information compiled from organizations including: WalletHub, Area Development, Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, Yahoo News, America’s Health Rankings, alec.org, Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, movoto.com, Fodors, livability.com, United Van Lines, Kauffman Foundation, Coed.com, Milk-Bone, U.S. Census Bureau, Gallup, Neighborhood Scout, United Health Foundation, Bleacher Report, Saturday Down South GOGAMECOCKS.COM Video: T.J. Gurley explains playing ‘off coverage.’ Live Q&A with Josh Kendall, 11 a.m. Thursday INSIDE Notebook and Cloninger’s insider report, 3B. This week in the SEC, 5B. Illustrated using USC’s projected starters for Saturday’s game HOW IT WORKS A Cover 2 splits the deep part of the field into two halves, one for each safety. Underneath, the corners and linebackers split the fields into five short zones. The Cover 2 relies on the front four to generate a pass rush. Without pressure, a team’s zone coverage can be picked apart. HOW TO ATTACK IT Slot receivers and fast tight ends can split the safeties and get big gains down the middle. If receivers can get to the sideline with speed, the safeties might struggle to contain them. Flat routes and wheel routes can attack the gap in between the outside linebacker and cornerback.
  31. 31. INFORMATIONAL GRAPHICS PORTFOLIO OpenDivision FIRST PLACE: The Post and Courier Brandon Lockett SHOTSFIREDA8: Wednesday, May 27, 2015 The Post and Courier BRANDON LOCKETT/STAFFSOURCE:STATE LAW ENFORCEMENT DIVISION; POST AND COURIER RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS The deadly force filesTogetafullpictureaboutthenatureandextentofofficer-involvedshootings,ThePostandCourier—whichbegananinvestigationfourmonthsago—obtainedinformationfromtheStateLawEnforcementDivision aboutthe245casesfrom2009throughMay21,2015.Theinformationincludedvideos,crimescenephotos,forensicreportsandotherdocuments.Allbut10casesinvolvedpolicefiringtheirweapons.Thenewspaper createdadatabasefromthisinformation,andincaseswhereSLEDdeclinedtosupplyinformation,othersourceswereusedtocompileentries,includingcourtrecordsandnewsreports. Reasons police said they opened fire* Police said they faced these weapons* 5 Officerwasthreatened withweaponother thangun 1 Aggressive dog 1 Suspect gained control of police weapon 1 Too dark to see suspect’s hands 1 Person wouldn’t show hands 3 Armed robbery in progress 8 Suspect attempted to gain control of police weapon orry 10 269,291 Agencieswiththemostofficer-involvedshootingssincethestartof2009: RANK INCIDENTS 1.GreenvilleCountySheriff'sOffice 17 2.(tie)AndersonCountySheriff'sOffice 13 2.(tie)S.C.HighwayPatrol 13 2.(tie)CharlestonCountySheriff'sOffice 13 3.(tie)ColumbiaPoliceDepartment 12 3.(tie)RichlandCountySheriff'sOffice 12 4.NorthCharlestonPoliceDepartment 9 Florence 9.50 Anderson 8.55 Charleston 7.99 Richland 7.54 Aiken 7.50 Greenville 5.54 Spartanburg 4.57 Lexington 3.81 Horry 3.71 *per 100,000 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 Age and race of civilians injured or killed by police gunfire Age Black White OtherAbout half of the cases involved civilians between the ages of 19 and 32. 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015* 13 37 6 34 9 36 1 10 8 9 36 28 19 9 28 36 49 46 40 45 11 *2015 is through May 21 Civilians Officers Civilians,officersinjuredorkilledThe race of civilians and the police who shot them officer 11 Unknown 71 1 By Hispanic officer p 9 By black officer 62 By white officer 24 Unknown 89* Killed 96* Injured Civilians 46 Person shot first (at police) 45 Person threatened police with a gun 59 Vehicle driver posed a threat 18 Armed suspect refused to surrender 1 Shovel 1 Fork 1 Flashlight 6 Hand 1 Chair 2 Taser 1 Piece of asphalt 1 Baseball bat 6 Item mistaken for gun 6 129 Gun 58 Vehicle 16 Knife 7 Hostage situation 10 Thought suspect had a gun 11 Officer assaulted with weapon other than gun 3 Accidental Officers 49 Injured 6 Killed One was a suicide 4 Charged Three unarmed black civilians were killed and one was injured in these incidents.*An additional 10 deaths were self-inflicted, and five injuries were not due to police gunfire. People who killed themselves — or expressed an intent to die — accounted for about a third of officer-related shooting deaths. Suicide played large role 24% 10% Apparent suicide by cop Person killed self99 deaths Domestic violence played a role in roughly a quarter of the officer-involved shootings in which a civilian died. Some of those cases were also suicide-related. Domestic violence 25% Related to domestic violence 99 deaths Population based on 2010 census data. * In some cases, this data was not available. SEPT.28,2010:Sumter policeofficersJasonLyonsand MarkMosesspottedayoung manwhofittheloosedescrip- tionofasuspectinvolvedinan armedcarjacking:ablackman dressedinblack. WhenLyonsstopped25-year- oldAaronJacobsandtriedto pathimdown,theyoungman bolted.Lyonsgrabbedhim andthetwomenwrestled. Duringthestruggle,Jacobs wriggledfromhisshirt,expos- ingapistolinhiswaistband, theofficerssaid.Hethenbroke awayandran,pullingoutthe gunashetriedtoescape,they said.LyonsorderedJacobsto dropthepistol.Secondslater, gunfiresoundedfromLyons’ .40-caliberGlock.Jacobsfellto theground,mortallywounded. LyonsreportedthatJacobshad turnedandpointedapistolat him,forcinghimtofireinself- defense.Others,however,told StateLawEnforcementDivision investigatorsthattheynever sawJacobswithaweapon. “[Jacobs]ain’tneverpointed nofirearm,”witnessKendrick MillertoldWIS-TV.“Hewas moreabouttryingtorunaway.” Thecountycoronerrefused toreleaseanautopsyreport, butTheSumterItemgotitfrom anothersourceandrevealed thatJacobshadbeenshotin theback. Meanwhile,anothermanwas chargedwiththecarjackingin question.StatementsfromJa- cobs’sisterandafriendindicat-tt edhelikelywashomesleeping whenthecarjackingoccurred andwaswalkingtohisbuddy’s housewhenheencountered theofficers. ThirdCircuitSolicitorErnest Finneysaidhefoundinsuffi- cientevidencetochargeLyons withacrime.Thecaseisamong 235incidentsSLEDinvestigated inwhichpoliceofficersfired theirgunsatsomeone.Accord- ingtoSLEDfiles,someofthe otherjustifiedshootingcases playedoutthisway: OCTOBER2009:Spartan- burgCountySheriff’sDeputy BrandonBentleyshotandkilled adisturbedmanwhoreport-tt edlylungedathim,refusingre- queststostop.Neighborstold SLEDthesuspect,StevenSat-tt terfield,hadbeendepressed andacting“offhisrocker,” claimingtobeaprophetfrom Godwhocouldseedemons. OCTOBER200R 9:Horry Countyschoolresourceofficer MarcusRhodesshotandkilled a16-year-oldstudentatCaro- linaForestHighSchoolafterthe studentluredhimintohisoffice onthepretenseofhavingatalk andattackedtheofficerwitha largeknife.TrevorNeilVarinecz leftbehindasuicidenoteand reportedlypleadedwiththe officerduringthestruggleto shoothim. APRIL2011:Cherokee Countydeputiesweresentto ahouseinconnectionwitha “medicalemergency.”They foundDannyThomasatthe kitchentablewithtwohand- guns.Adeadwomanwas onthesofa.Lt.TimHillsaid Thomaspickeduponeofthe guns,soheshothiminthe chest.Thomasdiedfivedays later.Thomas’wifeapparently hadbeendeadinthehousefor acoupleofdays. DECEMBER20R 12:Agents fromthefederalBureauof Alcohol,Tobacco,Firearmsand Explosiveslearnedinaplan torobHispanicdrugdealers inGreenvilleCounty,sothey setupatrapforthewould-be bandits.ATFsetoffadiver-rr sionaryexplosionwhenthe suspectsarrived,andthemen fled.Onesuspectshotatthe agentsandwoundedanATF dog.Anagentarmedwitha beanbaggunhitthesuspect intheleg,knockinghimdown. Thedogdiedandthesuspects werearrested. SEPTEMBER2013:R Ander-rr sonpoliceheardagunshot fromamotelroomwherethey hadlocatedafugitive.The wantedman,CaseySmith,told policeheshothimself,andslid agunoutfromunderthebed wherehewashiding.When policeliftedthebed,Smith pulledoutasecondgunand firedattheofficers.Fiveof-ff ficersfired30shotsatSmith, hittinghimatleast20times. Smithdied.Awomanwhohad beenwithSmithtoldinvesti- gatorshevowed“hewasnot goingbacktojail,butwasgo- ingtoshoothimselfandevery officeraroundhim.” Case by case That’s more than double the number of people killed in the 9/11 terror attacks. In recent years, noticeable gains have been made in the state’s booming metropolitan areas, where state-of-the-art hospitals and programs exist to help new mothers through the risks of pregnancy and the fragile first months after birth. But poor areas of South Carolinahavebeenleftbehind, withneitherthemoneynorthe resourcestoconquertheprob- lems claiming their young, the newspaper’s investigation found. Consider the following: The mothers of more than aquarterofthenewbornswho died last year received little or no prenatal care. The death rate for those babies is more than five times the statewide rate.Forblacksit’saboutseven times higher. The state has seen its infant mortality fall significantly be- fore, only to have it rise again. From 2002 to 2003, the rate droppedmorethan10percent. Then in 2004, it increased by more than 10 percent. Among blacks in some ru- ralcounties,infantsdieatrates triple that of whites, mirror- ing infant death rates in such impoverished countries as Vietnam. Worldwide, infant mortality rates are considered a bellwether for a country’s overall health. Saving money is one of theaa key motivators behind the state’sdesiretoimproveinfant health. That’s because Medic- aid in South Carolina pays for more than half of all births every year. The issue is complex. When askedtocalculatehowmuchit spends each month on babies in neonatal intensive care, the statedeclined.Itsexplanation: Theinformationwasnotread- ily available. EightofSouthCarolina’s46 countiesdon’thaveanobstetri- cian, a physician who special- izes in care for women during pregnancy and childbirth. Two other counties have only one part-time specialist. This leaves patients with little or no ability to get vital health care needed during their pregnancies. The system set up to train physicians in South Carolina and throughout the United States does little to encourage medical school graduates to practice in rural areas where theneedforhealthcareismost acute. South Carolina is not alone inthisdisparitybetweeneither rural and urban or white and black rates of newborn deaths. In its latest two annual re- ports, Child Health USA 2012 and2013,theU.S.Department ofHealthandHumanServices said infant mortality in rural counties,especiallysmallones, runs almost 10 percent higher than in urban areas. For example, Georgia’s rural Lowndes County, on the Flor- ida border, was identified in a 2012publichealthreportasthe state’s worst for infant mortal- ity, with a rate three times the national average of about six deaths for every 1,000 births. For blacks nationwide, the rate of newborn death was more than double whites. And inSouthCarolina,blackbabies fared slightly better than the national average, the report showed. Southern states generally scored higher rates of black infant mortality than the na- tion as a whole, but several Midwestern states, such as Wisconsin, Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio, were equally high. Hurdles to care critical The Medical University of South Carolina purposely set up its North Charleston Chil- dren’s Care clinic in a strip mall, on a public bus line near Northwoods Mall, so low- income families can get to the doctor more easily. HenryLemon,apediatrician at the clinic, said lack of trans- portation is one of the biggest hurdles for the poor in obtain- ing routine medical care. That hurdle is far higher in the state’s rural areas, where people not only lack public transportation but also doc- tors,especially specialistswho focus on women’s health and childbirth. Poor rural areas simply “aren’t attractive places for doctors to live,” Lemon said. The vast majority of more than 500 OB/GYNs in South Carolina practice in the state’s three main metropolitan ar- eas — Charleston, Columbia and Greenville — making it extremely difficult for many women to get specialized care during their pregnancies. Low-income women are en- titledtoMedicaidduringtheir pregnancies,butthatmaybeof little benefit in many parts of the state with no specialists in women’s care and few family doctors, Lemon said. “You can provide insurance, but you can’t provide medical care.” A committee set up two years ago by the Legislature to study graduate medical education in South Carolina found “pockets of medically underserved populations” throughout the state. “Thestatehasstruggledtoat- tract and retain physicians to serve in these areas,” the com- mittee’s report stated. The committee recom- mended last year that South Carolina set aside 15 percent of the state and federal money used each year for graduate medical education, mainly hospital residencies, to train doctors to work in rural communities.That’sabout$28 million. Sofar,thathasnothappened. For poor, rural South Caro- linians the hurdles to proper medical care remain. Many can’t afford it; and if they could, it’s almost impossible to get to the doctor. Lemon sees part of that Catch-22 play out at his clinic. “We are undergoing our second expansion of physi- cal space, and the decision to stay in this commercial plaza was based on the fact that we have a bus stop in front of the building.” If rural areas don’t have doc- tors or medical facilities and people have to travel long dis- tances for appointments, the oddsaretheywon’tgoasoften astheyshouldorwon’tgoatall, Lemon said. “If people have to travel, it can determine the amount of care they get.” It’s not unusual in some rural counties that the first time a poor, pregnant mother sees a doctor is when sheshowsupattheemergency room to deliver, Lemon said. Fighting daunting odds in S.C. By the numbers In 2013, 56,732 babies were born in South Carolina. Source: S.C. DHEC Birth Certificate data 389 babies died before their first birthdays. 579 mothers received no prenatal care prior to delivery. 2,854 mothers who de- livered received fewer than five prenatal visits. 15,751 mothers were obese prior to pregnancy. 13,528 mothers were overweight prior to pregnancy. 1,185 babies were born prior to 32 weeks gestation. 6,190 mothers used tobacco prod- ucts while they were pregnant. 4,259 babies were ad- mitted to a neo- natal intensive care unit after they were born. Eight of the statef ’s 46 counties don’t have an obstetrician. Two other counties have only one part-time specialist. This leaves women with little or no ability to get vital health care needed during their pregnancies. BRANDON LOCKETT/STAFFSOURCE: S.C. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL; CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY WORLD FACTBOOK (2013) On the web For a more detailed look at infant mortality rates comparing South Carolina to the world, go to postandcourier.com/infant-mortality 5th Charleston County’s ranking for best infant mortality rate in South Carolina in 2013. 50Number of counties with lower infant mortality rates than the U.S. in 2013 9th The Palmetto State’s rank for worst infant mortality rate in the U.S. in 2010. If South Carolina were a country and included in the 2013 CIA World Factbook list of infant mortality rates, it would fall between Estonia (6.82) and the Virgin Islands (6.94). Did you know? McCormick County (25), S.C.’s worst county, ranks worse than Guatemala (24.32). Barnwell County, S.C.’s second worst county (15.9), ranks close to the Gaza Strip (16). Chesterfield County (15.3), S.C.’s third worst county, ranks worse than China (15.2). Laurens County (13.8) ranks close to the West Bank (13.98). Florence County (12.2) ranks close to Malaysia (13.69). South Carolina’s infant mortality rate in 2013 has dropped to its lowest level ever, but in many parts of the state, particularly rural counties, newborns still die at alarming rates. Infant mortality rates are the number of newborns who die before their first birthday, per 1,000 live births. S.C.’s third-world infant death rates INFANTSfrom Page A1 Please see INFANTS,Page A8 CRADLE OF SHAMEThe Post and Courier Thursday, March 12, 2015: A7AA Mount Pleasant Charleston Johns Island James Island North Charleston 5 1 6 7 4 3 2 Hispanic Asian Black White One dot equals one person in 2010, mapped by census block. West Ashley7 Stall High6 School of the Arts5 North Charleston High4 Military Magnet Academy3 Burke High2 1 BRANDON LOCKETT/STAFF;WELDON COOPER CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE,UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA; NATIONAL HISTORIC GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM AlthoughblackandwhiteresidentsinCharlestonCountystilllivein mostlysegregatedcommunities,schoolchoicehasallowedthousandsof studentstoseekopportunitiesbeyondthoseconfinesbytransferringto otherpublicschoolsinthedistrict.Butchoicealsoleftotherstudentsbehind inshrinking,mostlyblackandlow-performingschoolsthatfacesteep challengesevenastheareasaroundthemreviveandprosper.Gentrification hasbroughtthrongsofwhitestudentsintotheattendancezonesofNorth CharlestonandBurkehighschools,butmostopttoattendotherschools. RACIAL SEGREGATION CLEAR ACROSS REGION North Charleston High North Charleston High (4) sits in trendy Park Circle, but 62 percent of the students zoned to attend the school choose to go elsewhere.The majority of its remaining student body comes from mostly black, poor areas to the south. Students at two nearby magnet schools, however, are mostly white and affluent. Burke High Burke High (2) sits in the thick of the gentrifying and booming peninsula, but 63 percent of its intended student body fled to other schools last year. Just one white student attended the school. LEFTBEHIND “Here is the average you have in my class right now. I hope that will change.” She returns to her stool front and center to discuss yesterday’s class. It didn’t go so well, starting with the behavior of students en route to the computer lab. They were loud and disrespectful to the other teach- ers and students — and to themselves. “It was just embarrassing,” she adds. Then they didn’t do the assessment she gave them. Lots of zeroes went into her grade book. Grades tumbled just days be- fore the third quarter ends. Some students even cheated. They aren’t in class today. “I read your stuff when I should have been paying attention to my own family,” she says earnestly, “because I care about you guys!” Pin drop silence. SNAPSHOTS OF A SEMESTER stead, the buzz-cut senior sits at a long guidance office conference table with freshly delivered pizza and 14 hand-picked fellow students. Katie Tumbleston and Sarah Fichera stand before the group. They’re from the city of Charleston Mayor’s Office for Chil- dren, Youth, and Families and have come to hear what students want from their community. “Do you feel part of the larger school dis- trict, or like you are just defined as North Charleston High School?” The students agree: just North Charles- ton High School. “When they step into North Charleston, they think it’s going to be like a jungle — and it’s not,” senior Chelsea Moultrie says. “We’re amazing!” Mikayla Fuller grins. From across the table, Kayla Harrington “They’re making us look like a lower school because they pick the students with the highest grades. It makes our school look less than we are,” Orlando says. Yet this group wants to interact more with students from those schools. “We’re so separated from each other,” junior Brittany Wallace says. What if they could take drama or music classes at SOA or other classes not offered here? “Segregation happens in many ways. It’s not just the color of your skin. It’s how we feel segregated from Academic Magnet and SOA. That’s segregation, too,” Kayla says. The group talks so long, so passionately, that Tumbleston must stop them. “You are wise beyond your years,” she says. “Some adults don’t have your in- sight.” down by a respectable 12. Then a funny thing happens. They catch up. And even the teachers are cheering. The seniors commit a foul under the bas- ket, and a new student who just enrolled in midyear makes a foul shot to tie up the game. The 100 or so students on hand shriek. A scramble, and the seniors score. Breaths are held. Prayers are said. The game is within one point. Charging down the court, a freshman shoots for a long- shot buzzer-beater. Swoosh! It is 37 to 36, an unlucky Friday the 13th for the senior class. The stands burst into a geyser of screams, a wave of bodies flood- ing the court. Maybe there’s some Cougar pride left after all. The Post and Courier
  32. 32. INNOVATIVE CONCEPT OpenDivision THIRD PLACE: The Greenville News Staff On April 30, a whippet-bor- dercolliemixwasbroughtinto Greenville County Animal Care on Furman Hall Road. She’d been found wandering around Spartanburg County, and was delivered to the area’s primary open shelter. Her name is Whirly. And she is one of 1,227 animals that were brought to the shelter last month. On Monday, she cametotheGreenvilleNewsas our first newshound. She’ll spend her days in our news- room, helping lift the spirits of our news staff. But she’s avail- able for adoption — just like the other 400 or so dogs that areintheshelteronanaverage day.Youcanalsofollowherex- ploits on Twitter, @New- shoundGVL. Often, there is a perception that the stories from an open animal shelter are sad. And they can be. Last month, Greenville County Animal Care euthanized more animals than were adopted. But the goal of the shelter is rooted in happiness — providing homes for the animals and dramat- ically reducing the number that have to be euthanized. The community is vital to helpingchangethat,saidPaula Church, community relations coordinator at the shelter. That help comes in two forms: Contributions, and community awareness that leads to increased adoptions from the shelter. “What we need to do is get the public behind adopting these animals,” Church said. “We have so many. If we can get our adoption numbers up it would make a huge difference for the animals at our facility in terms of having space for them.” Last month, for example — themonththatsawthatshelter bring in 1,227 animals — it adopted out 337. Another 347 were transferred to rescue groups. There is more work to be done. Betty Star, who is the adop- tions supervisor at the shelter, stressed the two other needs: volunteers and donations. For those who can’t adopt, these are two avenues to help, she said. Among the most pressing needs: canned and dry dog and cat food, blankets and towels, new socks and sweaters. Of course, financial contributions also are appreci- ated. There also is plenty of room for volunteers, Church said. “We have a huge volunteer program, but it always can be bigger.Wehavejobsforevery- one,” she said. Throughout this week we’ll be talking about more of the services that are offered at Greenville County Animal Care. Follow our Newshound, Whirly, @NewshoundGVL. MYKAL MCELDOWNEY/STAFF Whirly the newshound was brought into Greenville County Animal Care last month after being found wandering around Spartanburg County. Greenville News’ foster dog highlighting shelter needs Whirly is available for adoption STEVEN BRUSS
  33. 33. INNOVATIVE CONCEPT OpenDivision SECOND PLACE: The Post and Courier J. Emory Parker
  34. 34. INNOVATIVE CONCEPT OpenDivision FIRST PLACE: The Post and Courier J. Emory Parker
  35. 35. AFFILIATED OR NICHE WEBSITE OpenDivision HONORABLE MENTION: Spurs & Feathers/ Aiken Standard Brian Hand, Kyle Heck and Tim O’Briant
  36. 36. AFFILIATED OR NICHE WEBSITE OpenDivision THIRD PLACE: Independent Mail Staff
  37. 37. AFFILIATED OR NICHE WEBSITE OpenDivision SECOND PLACE: Herald-Journal Jose Franco
  38. 38. AFFILIATED OR NICHE WEBSITE OpenDivision FIRST PLACE: The Post and Courier Kurt Knapek, Laura James&CarolineFossi
  39. 39. SPORTS MAGAZINE OpenDivision THIRD PLACE: The Herald Staff Chasing scholarships . ........................................................................................... York, Chester and Lancaster counties seeing influx of college football-worthy talent . ........................................................................................... 2015 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW Thursday, August 20, 2015
  40. 40. SPORTS MAGAZINE OpenDivision SECOND PLACE: The State Staff
  41. 41. SPORTS MAGAZINE OpenDivision FIRST PLACE: Index-Journal Mundy Price
  42. 42. DIGITAL NEWS PROJECT OpenDivision THIRD PLACE: Herald-Journal Staff
  43. 43. DIGITAL NEWS PROJECT OpenDivision SECOND PLACE: The Island Packet Staff
  44. 44. DIGITAL NEWS PROJECT OpenDivision FIRST PLACE: The State SammyFretwell,Matt Walsh,GerryMelendez, andChrisHessert
  45. 45. FLOOD COVERAGE AllDailyDivision THIRD PLACE: The Sun News Staff
  46. 46. FLOOD COVERAGE AllDailyDivision SECOND PLACE: The State Staff TODAY’S DEAL: Columbia Classic Ballet company $13 for $26 Ticket! Get the deal of the day at dealsaver.com/columbia. MONDAY OCTOBER 5 2015 $1.00 VOL. 125TH, No. 230 STAY CONNECTED THESTATE.COM FACEBOOK.COM/THESTATENEWS TWITTER.COM/@THESTATE TODAY: RAIN; FLOOD WARNINGS HI 67 LO 56 YESTERDAY: HI 71 LO 64 PRECIP. (as of 5 p.m.) 7.49” FORECAST, 12C TOP SPORTS STORIES STAY CONNECTED CLEMSON Saturday’s win over Notre Dame propels Tigers to top 10 ranking PAGE 1B Classifieds 9C Comics 7C Go Columbia 12C Obituaries 4C Opinion 3C A slow-moving storm produced historic floods Sunday after dumping more than a foot of rain in parts of Columbia. The rainfall submerged low-lying traffic intersections, washed away roads and flooded homes. Dozens of people needed to be rescued by police and firefighters or were ferried to safety by neighbors in boats. A mother and child were plucked off a rooftop in Rich- land County by an S.C. National Guard helicopter, state Adjutant General Robert Livingston said. The deluge also caused several water mains to break in the Columbia water system, forcing many residents to lose service, according to a news release from the city. The worst-hit areas were down- town Columbia and southeast Richland County. Residents may be without service for three to four days, the city said. Mean- while, water customers with service in Columbia, West Columbia and Blythe- wood were advised to vigorously boil the water for at least a minute before drink- ing it. Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott said Sunday that city and county law enforce- ment, as well as the Columbia Fire De- partment, pulled hundreds of people out of situations where they were endangered by rising waters. “And there likely have been thousands of houses and homes and cars that have had water damage,” Lott said. While as much as 16.6 inches fell in some areas around Columbia on Sunday, officially more than 10 inches of rain was counted at Columbia Metropolitan Air- port on Saturday and Sunday, according to the National Weather Service. That set the 128-year-old record for two days (7.7 inches) and three days (8.4 inches). A single-day record was set on Sunday at almost seven inches. Some areas around Columbia received as much rain Sunday as the region ab- sorbed in the past three months com- bined, according to National Weather Service data. Another inch or two of rain was expected overnight. The effects of the storm will linger Monday as rivers and creeks remain swol- len and streets flooded after the record rainfall. “It’s not over,” Gov. Nikki Haley said. “We’re still in the middle of it.” On Monday, schools and colleges, in- cluding the University of South Carolina, canceled classes. Government offices in Richland and Lexington counties as well Historic flood ravages Midlands Storm drenched Columbia area with more rain than previous three months combined Rain will linger Monday as crews try to assess damage from flooding Surges of water closed roads, swelled rivers and creeks and led to one death in Columbia MATT WALSH mwalsh@thestate.com Department of Natural Resources workers make a rescue in Forest Acres during Sunday morning's flood. BY ANDREW SHAIN ashain@thestate.com GILLS CREEK (Devine Street near Rosewood Drive) 5.1 FEET Sunday midnight 14 FEET Major flood stage 17.1 FEET Sunday 7 a.m. 9.4 FEET Previous record from 1997 CONGAREE RIVER IN COLUMBIA (Near Gervais Street bridge) 13.6 FEET Sunday midnight 22.8 FEET Sunday 7 a.m. 30 FEET Major flood stage: 31.7 FEET Sunday 6 p.m. 33.3 FEET Record from 1936SEE FLOOD, 10A UPDATES ONLINE For updated news, including closings, go to thestate.com. Also, while storm conditions and safety considerations may delay Monday delivery of The State in some areas, you can read the news online at thestate.com and you can view a replica of the print edition by connecting to thestate.com/e-edition. INSIDE Your house is flooded? Now, what do you do? Some tips. 6A Lexington County Residents advised to evacuate from riverbanks as utility opens Lake Murray spillways, 7A Closures Most Midlands schools, governments will be closed Monday, 7A Richland County Record rainfall turned normally quiet Gills Creek into a roaring river, 8A Forest Acres Columbia suburb hit hard for second time in a week, this time by rising water, 9A South Carolina Record floods Sunday shut down hundreds of roads statewide, forcing thousands to flee their homes or vehicles, 10A
  47. 47. FLOOD COVERAGE AllDailyDivision FIRST PLACE: The Post and Courier Staff BY CHRISTINA ELMORE celmore@postandcourier.com Relentless, record-breaking rainfall Saturday inundated dozens of Lowcountry thorough- fares, uprooted trees, forced residents out of their homes, stranded motorists and shut down the Charleston peninsula for an entire day. And it’s not over yet. The tri-county area averaged about 6 inches of rainfall between Friday and Saturday nights, with another 6 to 10 inches possible before the storm dissipates, National Weather Service me- teorologists reported. Moisture offshore from Hurricane Joaquin, which hovered northeast of the Bahamas Sat- urdaynight,strengthenedbyanareaoflowpres- sureintheSoutheastandafrontstalledoverthe East Coast will continue to drench much of the state until the tropical system moves further out into the Atlantic, according to the Weather Service. “This is a pretty extreme event, that’s for sure” said meteorologist Peter Mohlin. In roughly three decades spent covering the weather, Mohlin said he’s lived through “in- teresting” hurricanes and “impressive” snow storms. This, he said, was different. “To get that much rain in such a large area for suchalongtime—formanypeople,thisispretty significant,” he said, “especially if they’re being impacted and forced to move from their homes. Wewishpeoplewell,butitmaytakeuntilSunday nightormaybeearlyMondaybeforethisisdone and over with.” CharlestonCityCouncilpassedanemergency ordinance Saturday granting public safety offi- cials the authority to restrict access downtown Historic deluge Relentless rain breaks records, and it’s not over yet PAUL ZOELLER/STAFF Kyle Barnell (right) and Dillon Christ take a boat ride through the flooded streets of downtown Charleston on Saturday. Flooding causing sewage problems in some areas. A7 Rain didn’t stop couple from going ahead with wedding. A7 Search continues for freighter lost in hurricane. A15 A list of area closings and cancellations. A4 Online For an updated forecast, go to postandcourier.com/weather. Gallery For more photos, go to post andcourier.com/galleries. Inside Please see RAIN,Page A7
  48. 48. EDITORIAL OR COLUMN IN SUPPORT OF FOI/OPEN GOVERNMENT ISSUES AllDailyDivision HONORABLE MENTION: Aiken Standard Tim O’Briant BY TIM O’BRIANT tobriant@aikenstandard.com The true measure ofintegrity is doingwhatisrightandjusteven whennoone is looking. Onthe otherextreme, choosingto dothewrong thingunder thewatchful eyesofoth- ers,as the Aiken County SchoolBoard didthisweek, isnothinglessthan reminderofSouthCarolina’s Freedom ofInformation,orFOI, legal requirements, delivered - eventhoughtheirownattorney advised they likelyhad no legal - - tionofstatelaw.Thetwo“no” door session evenaftervoting against it. Iattendedthemeetingand tookthejournalisticallyunusual aforementionedFOIreminder relatedtoSchoolBoardexecu- tive sessions. Inthis case, they voted toclose the meeting to discuss negotiationsrelatedto a contract when, infact, there wasnocontractatall.Whatthey on the searchfor a new district closedsession todiscuss a letter whichwasnotacontractinany doorstodiscusshowtheywill One might read this and assume - drels.Idonot.Infact,Ithinkthey and hard toserve the childrenof this community.Theyreceive - tions theymakeand,sometimes, it easiertoconduct muchoftheir withthemonthatcount.Noneof that changes the laws that govern thewaytheyhavetoconductthe theFOIviolations involvedhere don’trisetoWatergatelevelsor ifthe Board chooses toconduct whenhandlingsomethingtruly controversial.Withcontrolofa - get –whichisfarmoretaxmoney CountyCouncilandallthecity councils inAikenCountycom- Intheend,voterscanonlyeval- theinterestsofthosetheyserve? secretive discussions short circuit Beyond those concerns ofdol- - - district. Asthe court oflast resort wouldtolerate selectiveadher- oversee.Imagine the chaos ifev- andchoosewhichclassroomrules tofollowandwhichtoignorefor hisorherownconvenience. From - are small and rarelyenforced – a None ofus wants tosee such willexaminetheirownactions they hold. that are so very critical to the - munity. Tim O’Briant is the Aiken Standard editor and director of audience. He can be reached at tobriant@aikenstandard. com or 803-644-2380. COLUMN O’Briant School board must work to get it right
  49. 49. EDITORIAL OR COLUMN IN SUPPORT OF FOI/OPEN GOVERNMENT ISSUES AllDailyDivision THIRD PLACE: Index-Journal Richard Whiting McCormick County board act as masters of people McCormick County school district residents and taxpayers, rest comfortably knowing that your school board has everything under control. No, wait. Make that rest comfortably knowing that your school board controls everything. You see, the board does not believe you need to fret about who might be the interim superintendent to fill the void left when William Wright resigned last month to take the reins of a school district in his native North Carolina. It seems the board has found six potential candidates for the job and has been conducting inter- views with them. The board will have its final set of interviews Monday night and is poised to make its selection Tuesday. OnOct.16,theIndex-JournalfiledaFreedomofInfor- mationActrequestwiththeschooldistrictinaneffortto receivethenamesofthosebeingconsideredforthejob. Followinglastweek’snewsthatsixhadbeenchosen,the newspaperinquiredwhetheritwouldgetthosenamesin advanceofTuesday’smeeting.Aresounding“no”iswhat wegot.Itseemstheschoolboard,itsattorneyandschool districtofficialsarenotatallinterestedinsharingthose nameswiththepublicbeforetheyvote,eventhoughthey clearlyhaveacandidateslistthatshouldbemadepublic underthestatelaw. Instead of providing names of those the board has interviewed and plans to interview, meeting agendas and minutes were sent via email to the newspaper last Wednesday, with the following note: “Please find attached the Board agendas and meeting minutes refer- encing the selection of an Interim Superintendent. The District will respond to your FOIA request within the 15-day window permitted under the statute. If circum- stances permit, and we can respond to your request prior to November 6th, we will do so.” That note was from Shamika Long-Lane, executive director of operations for the school district. What is clear is this: The board will most likely make a deci- sion Tuesday night and, rather than abide by the intent and spirit of state law, the board intends to stretch its response time by using the full 15-business day window allotted public bodies to respond to FOIA requests. Again, bear in mind the board clearly has narrowed its search to six potential candidates, a list it could and should have provided last week. Instead, the response is to wiggle around the law a bit by invok- ing the 15-day response time it has to comply with the paper’s Oct. 16 request. It was not lost on us that Long-Lane’s emails all end with the following messages: “We, not Me” and a quote from basketball great Michael Jordan that reads “Some people want it to happen some people wish it to hap
  50. 50. EDITORIAL OR COLUMN IN SUPPORT OF FOI/OPEN GOVERNMENT ISSUES AllDailyDivision SECOND PLACE: The Post and Courier Elsa McDowell S C e r C w r e t n C s s w t t c u l s i f i c t c c A w s W hen witnesses clam up or disappear — and suspected criminals are released as a result — the good guys lose. Police, whose hands are tied, lament that not enoughcitizenshelpthemgetbadguysoffthe streets. Clearly,somewould-beinformantsdon’tfeel safe.Theyfearretributionfromtheaccusedor his friends. They don’t have confidence that the police will be able to protect them. Andashasbecomemoreobviousacrossthe countrythisyear, manycitizens—particularly black citizens — simply don’t trust police. That problem is exacerbated when law en- forcement agencies develop their own repu- tations for withholding information. And while S.C. lawmakers wisely voted to require law enforcement officers to wear body cameras, the law allows only people capturedonvideo,criminaldefendantsand civil litigants access to the recordings. The police should not have the license to withhold video from incidents when some- one is injured or killed by an officer. Doing so only would widen the credibility gap be- tween the authorities and the public. Some law enforcement agencies refuse to release dashcam footage, which is supposed to be available to the public. For example, a dashcam video is still under wraps in the February2014shootingdeathofanunarmed 68-year-oldEdgefieldCountyresident.Alaw enforcementofficerwaschargedinthecase. In another troubling case, the U.S. Justice Department opened an investigation last month into the July 26 shooting death of a 19-year-oldmanbyapoliceofficerinSeneca, S.C.TheStateLawEnforcementDivisionhas refused to release the dashcam footage. Recordedfootagecancuttotheheartofthe matter. Just consider the bystander’s video of the April shooting death of Walter Scott in North Charleston, for which then-police officer Michael Slager has been charged. Consider,too,theinevitabledeclineoftrust that occurs when lengthy delays in the re- lease of evidence cause the public to suspect a cover-up by law enforcement officials. And, on the other hand, consider the risks when witnesses withhold information from police and prosecutors. According to Monday’s Post and Courier, two Charleston men were arrested in 2012 on suspicion that they killed a man in West Ashley. The arrest relied on information fromthreewitnesses.Butpolicehadtodrop the case because the witnesses’ testimony was “no longer available.” Police said the case was one of several in which witnesses have retracted their state- ments or simply disappeared, leaving pros- ecutors without the evidence to go to trial. Another involved a 2012 North Charleston home-invasion and robbery in which one man was killed and another wounded. People can help make their communities safer by stepping up when they have infor- mation that would help solve a crime. And law enforcement can help establish trust with communities by being as open as agencies want citizens to be. No secrets in fighting crime
  51. 51. EDITORIAL OR COLUMN IN SUPPORT OF FOI/OPEN GOVERNMENT ISSUES AllDailyDivision FIRST PLACE: The Greenville News Beth Padgett T he Greenville News and two other area newspapers have filed a lawsuit against the State Law Enforcement Division in an effort to gain access to video and other public records in the case of Zachary Hammond. He was the 19-year who was killed by a Seneca police officer on the night of July 26, and many questions that surround his death most likely could be cleared up by the police dash camera videos from that deadly encounter. This lawsuit should not be necessary because SLED should have released these records, including the dash cam video that should be most informative, at least a month ago. Serious questions surround the shooting and there are conflicting stories about what happened that night in the parking lot of a Hardee’s restaurant. Law enforcement video has been released in other high-profile incidents and there’s no good reason for law enforce- ment to continue to shield rec- ords concerning Hammond’s death. Hammond was killed in the fast-food parking lot by Seneca Police Lt. Mark Tiller during what has been called a marijuana sting operation. The target of the sting was the passenger in Ham- mond’s car; the passenger was not hurt during the shooting. Seneca Police Chief John Covington has been quoted as saying the officer fired two shots through the driver’s side window because he thought the driver was going to run over him. How- ever the family of the Seneca High School graduate has dis- puted the story told by police about how the shooting occurred. Continuing to withhold the video erodes the credibility of Seneca police. In early August a lawyer rep- resenting the Hammond family said an independent autopsy authorized by the family, and performed by two pathologists with the Greenville Health Sys- tem, showed the young man was shot “from left to right and back to front.” The lawyer has argued that the findings of the indepen- dent autopsy indicated that the officer could not have been in the path of the car if it was mov- ing. The lawsuit was filed last week by The Greenville News, The Anderson Independent-Mail and The Journal of Seneca. The news- papers argued that there is no reason to refuse to release the video and records because “there is no prospective law enforcement action to be un- dertaken by defendant, there is no risk of endangering the life, health or property of any person, and there are no matters ex- empted from disclosure by other statute or law.” As Greenville News writer Ron Barnett reported last week, the dashboard camera in Tiller’s vehicle captured the incident, but the video has been in SLED’s hands since that night. It recent- ly was turned over to 10th Cir- cuit Solicitor Chrissy Adams but she has refused to release the video. She has said she is waiting for more information from fed- eral investigators before making a decision to file charges. These are increasingly weak excuses. Hammond’s family and the public should be able to view the dash cam video so they can make independent judgments about what happened that night when the young man was shot and killed. Eric Bland, the fam- ily’s attorney, said last month that SLED and the Solicitor’s Office have violated the state’s Freedom of Information Act by not releasing the information in a timely manner. The solicitor and Seneca police seem to be “moving the chains and changing the rules,” Bland was quoted as saying. South Carolina is one of those states where law enforcement enjoys deep respect and strong support from many citizens, and often police officers are given the benefit of the doubt. A num- ber of deadly incidents in our nation in recent months, includ- ing one in North Charleston, have later been put in a new light after either video or more in- formation, or both, have cast doubt on the original report of law enforcement. A movement to require police to wear body cameras has gained traction after such incidents. While video may not answer all the questions of what took place in an incident, it helps citizens gain a better view. More timely release of videos recorded by dashboard cameras or police body cameras should be required by law. Until that hap- pens in South Carolina, a court should ensure the release of the video and other evidence in the shooting of Zachary Hammond. Release video of police shooting FILE Zachary Hammond was shot to death by a Seneca police officer in July.
  52. 52. E.A. RAMSAUR MEMORIAL AWARD FOR EDITORIAL WRITING AllDailyDivision THIRD PLACE: The Post and Courier Elsa McDowell O ffshore drilling apologists saytheindustryisessentially spill free, but the truth is an- other thing altogether. For example, a recent Associated Press investigation of an oil leak that has per- sisted for a decade off the coast of Loui- siana, spilling up to 1.4 million gallons of oil, shows that data provided by the government cannot be trusted. So the question for South Carolina is: Why in the world would anyone support offshoredrillingthatcouldwelldevastate thestate’sbeautiful,healthycoastandthe tourism that it depends on? Gov. Nikki Haley and every member of the S.C. congressional delegation except 6thDistrictRep.JamesClyburnhaveen- dorsed the federal government’s plan to explore drilling off the state’s coast. It’s time for them to admit that they have made a mistake. They should consider the story of the oilleakthatoccurredin2005whenHur- ricane Ivan’s waves triggered an under- water landslide. It toppled Taylor Energy Company’s platform and buried 28 wells about 10 miles off Louisiana’s coast. They are still leaking, and they’re leak- ing at a rate that is six times greater than the Coast Guard had estimated and 20 times greater than Taylor’s figures — in- formation discovered by the AP in its in- vestigation.Theoilslicksheenseenfrom monitoring flights covers eight square miles. Andit’snottheonlyone.TheU.S.Coast Guard’s National Response Center re- ported that Louisiana in 2014 had over 3,000 reported oil spills with volumes ranging up to 11.8 million gallons. It es- timates that 25 percent of oil spills are unreported. AmazinglythegovernmentallowsTay- lor to shield spill-related information from public scrutiny, citing the need to protect trade secrets. AndTaylorisnotevensharinginforma- tionthatcouldhelpotheroffshoreopera- torsprepareforasimilarincident,saying the information is a proprietary asset. SouthCaroliniansshouldbewaryofre- assurances that drilling would not harm the environment. It should also be wary ofpromisesofbillionsofnewdollarsand thousands of jobs for the state. AsstateSen.ChipCampsen,R-Charles- ton,wroteinarecentop-edonourCom- mentary page: “The land-based infrastructure neces- sary to support offshore drilling ... is not a pretty sight. It is extensive, dirty and highly industrial.” WherewouldthatgoontheSouthCar- olina coast? ClearlycoastalSouthCarolinashouldn’t be a sacrificial lamb. On Thursday, Georgetown became the 50th coastal community to officially op- pose offshore oil exploration and devel- opment off the East Coast. Mayor Jack Scoville said that “the risk to our citizens and our coast is not worth the slim pos- sibility of reward.” Surely if offshore drilling would ben- efit citizens, Mayor Scoville would be supporting it. Twenty-one percent of the city’sresidentslivebelowthepovertyline. Other communities standing in oppo- sition include Charleston, Folly Beach, HiltonHeadIsland,Beaufort,PortRoyal, theIsleofPalms,JamesIsland,Sullivan’s Island and Edisto Beach. Further, 65 members of Congress and more than 160 conservation and animal welfareorganizationsareagainstoffshore drilling. Why would all those people oppose something that would benefit them? Be- cause it won’t. 1.4millionreasonsnottodrill PAUL ZOELLER/STAFF New S.C. Department of Social Services Director Susan Alford has lunch at her desk between meetings in Columbia. DSS faces the challenge of overseeing both group homes and foster families throughout the state. U nthinkablethingscanhappen to children in group homes. Theycanbebeaten,molested, drugged and neglected. ButinSouthCarolina,informationabout such incidents is kept secret. That means parentsareinthedark—andpeoplewho want to address the problems don’t have the information they need to do so. The S.C.GeneralAssemblyneedstorecognize thatstatelawintendedtoprotectchildren is actually putting them at risk. Lastyear,theSenateinvestigatedtheDe- partment of Social Services after hearing allegations of mismanagement, unwork- able caseloads and deaths of children un- der the agency’s authority. Lillian Koller resigned as director under pressure from lawmakers who were exasperated by her refusaltoprovidedataaboutsocialwork- ers’ staggering caseloads. Herreplacement,SusanAlford,facesan uphill climb. The more forthcoming she is about the system’s shortcomings, the more likely the Legislature will work to make beneficial changes, starting with changing the law. She also should realign the DSS budget so that more children can be taken care of in homes of relatives or foster parents, and fewer in group homes. Studies show that children do better in home settings than they do in group homes. That’s reason enough. But an investigation by reporter Lauren Sausserrevealedthatgrouphomesacross thestatehavebeenthesubjectofmultiple complaints. And while administrators say that most of the complaints are un- founded, the public has no way to find out if that’s true. DSS, which is respon- sibleforgrouphomeoversight,willsay,for example, that New Hope in York County hasbeeninvestigatedfor119allegationsof abuse in the past 15 years. But it will not sayhowmanyallegationswereunfounded or how serious the allegations were. That would be an easy fix — were it not for state law thatcalls for the information to be withheld. It should be changed. Certainlythestateshouldprotectchildren bykeepingprivatetheirnamesanddetails of alleged abuse. But there is no reason not to have a place people can go to check outgrouphomesbeforemakingdecisions aboutplacingchildrenthere.Thedatabase couldcontainthenumberofabuseallega- tions, their severity and their disposition. Many children in group homes are troubled. It stands to reason that some allegations will prove untrue. The public deserves to know that. And group homes that are protecting children should have the satisfaction of the public knowing they’ve been cleared of charges. Ironically, the state pays five times as much money keeping children in group homes than in foster homes, and the outcome is usually inferior. Particularly young children (those up to 13 years of age)aremoreapttothriveinfosterhomes than in group homes. Unfortunately, South Carolina puts children in group homes and institutions at a rate higher than any other state in the country. Hence the reallocation of money. DSS needstorecruitmorefosterparentsandpay them better. Some receive as little as $12 a daytofeed,clotheandcareforachild.Only five states pay less for foster care. By reducing the number of children in group homes significantly, DSS would save tens of millions of dollars that could be used to beef up foster care. The children under the care of DSS are among the state’s most vulnerable. Many have been abused, yet they are being put in group homes where they risk further abuse.Thelikelihoodofthatabuseisclas- sified information. DSShasanewdirector.AndtheLegisla- turehasdemonstratedagenuineconcern for addressing DSS problems. It’s time for dramatic changes that will protect children and spend tax dollars more effectively. Endabuseingrouphomes T he General Assembly seems to have two choices: It can com- plainaboutanorderoftheS.C. SupremeCourt,oritcantryto improvethe inadequate schools inrural South Carolina. ToobadtheLegislature’sleadershiphas optedtocomplain,asyetanotherclassof ruralstudentsspendstheyearinschools that are inadequate in the eyes of the court—andpeoplethroughoutthestate. Oddly, Sen. President Pro Tempore Hugh Leatherman, R-Florence, and House Speaker Jay Lucas, R-Hartsville, did not take advantage of legal griev- ance procedures in an effort to amend or modify the order. Of course, ignoring the court is easier. After all, the Legislature has neglected the rural schools problem for decades. South Carolina’s high court took an inordinately long time — 22 years — to find that thestatehasfailedin itsduty to provide a “minimally adequate” educa- tion to children in the its poorest school districts. In November of 2014 the justices in- structedtheLegislaturetoworkwiththe schooldistrictsthathadsuedthestateto developaplaninareasonableamountof time to address the inadequacies. The court later said a panel of experts should be established by Oct. 15 of this yeartoreviewtheplanandreportonitto thecourt.TheplanitselfisdueonFeb.1, 2016—afull14monthsfromthefinding. Still,SpeakerLucascalledthedeadlines “arbitrary”and“unreasonable.”Heeven told Carl Epps, the lawyer representing the plaintiffs and certainly someone whoseperspectiveandknowledgewould behelpfultothecommittee,thathemust withdraw the request for a deadline or forfeit his seat on the task force. Giventhefoot-draggingthatlawmakers haveexhibitedsofar,it’sagoodguessthat without deadlines they would have con- tinuedtoputofffindingacomprehensive solution to the rural schools problem. Itreallyshouldn’thavetakenalawsuitto spark legislators’ concerns about failing schools in the poorest parts of the state. Without adequate educations, the resi- dents of those counties face tough odds for getting good jobs. And without adequately trained work- ers, those counties face tough odds for attractingbusinessandindustryandthe jobs they provide. ThisgovernorandtheLegislaturehave stressed “jobs, jobs, jobs” — and this is no way to bring them to our state. Gov. Nikki Haley has shown an inter- est in helping those poor, rural districts by offering incentives for teachers who takejobsinthem,expandingthereading coach program and providing modern technology. But there is much more to do, and the General Assembly must be part of that overdue process. Ifvotersquestiontheirelectedrepresen- tatives’commitmenttopubliceducation, the legislative leadership’s response in this Supreme Court case offers disturb- ing answers. It’s time for lawmakers to stop looking forexcusesandstartlookingforsolutions to the long-standing — and devastating — problem of inadequate rural schools. No excuses: Fix rural schools

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