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Ccps force, motion & energy workshop #2

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Ccps force, motion & energy workshop #2

  1. 1. Force, motion & Energy Funded by Grant received from Nebraska’s Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education (CCPE)
  2. 2. What ideas did you try from Workshop #1 ★ How did it go? ★ How did students respond? ★ Did you note any impact on learning? Explain.
  3. 3. Most importantly... Enjoy the Learning Experience ● Take comfort breaks as needed ● Ask questions ● Share ideas ● Share answers. Don’t be afraid of being “wrong”.
  4. 4. Do you typically teach force, energy & motion? Yes NoSome
  5. 5. How do you feel about teaching force, motion & energy? Excited! It makes me nervous and/or it’s not my favorite. Okay.
  6. 6. Overview of the grant project
  7. 7. Connection to NEbraska Science standards NE Science Standards ● SC5.1.1 Students will combine scientific processes and knowledge with scientific reasoning and critical thinking to ask questions about phenomenon and propose explanations based on gathered evidence. ● SC5.2.2 Students will identify the influence of forces on motion. ❖ SC5.2.2a Describe motion by tracing and measuring an object’s position over a period of time (speed). ❖ SC5.2.2b Describe changes in motion due to outside forces (push, pull, gravity) ❖ MA 5.4.2 Analysis & Applications: Students will analyze data to address the situation. ➢ MA 5.4.2.a Use observations and experiments to collect, represent, and interpret the data using tables and bar graphs.
  8. 8. pedagogical knowledge Teaching practices that enhance science instruction 1) Incorporate hands-on investigations ● Balloon Rocket ● Balloon Car ● Ballistic Car ● Design a candy corn catapult ● Design a roller coaster or Have a Ball activity 2) Incorporate technology ● On-line calculator ● PhET simulations ● Apps-Show Me ● Newsela 3) Multi-modal vocabulary ● Visual, Auditory, Kinesthetic 4) Actively engage students in collaborative learning ● Walk and Talk ● Numbered Heads Together ● Inside/Outside Circle
  9. 9. Force, motion & Energy Pre-Assessment Keep in mind…It’s okay not to know the answers☺
  10. 10. Reminder: Science logs/journals ● ● ● ● ● ***
  11. 11. Aristotl Galileo Isaac Physics review Review on Motion - a bit of history
  12. 12. Aristotle (~300 BC): natural and violent motion Natural motion of elements determines the motion of any object 4 elements: fire, water, earth, air Violent motion – overrides natural motion by means of forces CLAIM: Heavier object fall faster! Physics review
  13. 13. Galileo Galilei (16th - 17th century) – 1st astronomer Invented telescope in 1609 On motion: Inertia is the property of object to resist motion CLAIM: All object fall at the same rate! Physics review
  14. 14. Isaac Newton (17-18th century) •Newton’s 3 laws of motion 1. Inertia 2. Force causes acceleration 3. Action-reaction •Newton’s law of gravitation •Motion in mathematical form, introduced FORCES! Physics review
  15. 15. Motion is Relative •Everything is always moving. •Are you still right now? •At this moment, your speed relative to the Sun is about 100,000 kilometers per hour. •It’s all about choosing a point of reference. Physics review
  16. 16. Q: What is the difference between velocity and speed? a) They have different units b) Velocity includes speed and direction c) None, they are different words for the same thing Physics review
  17. 17. Q: What produces acceleration in your car? a) the accelerator b) the steering wheel c) the brake d) all of the above e) none of the above Physics review
  18. 18. Q: If you move in a circle at constant pace, are you accelerating? a) Yes b) No c) it depends Physics review
  19. 19. Review on Motion - Define Motion VocabularyPhysics review •Mass - amount of matter in an object • Measure of inertia, or “sluggishness” that an object exhibits in response to any effort to change its state of motion •Position - your place in space •Velocity - change in position over time • Speed + Direction •Acceleration - change in velocity over time • speeding up, slowing down, or going in curvy lines
  20. 20. The Moving Man - PHET Simulation Demo (advanced) Define motion terms: •Position •Velocity (speed + direction) – rate of change of position •Acceleration – rate of change of velocity https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/legacy/moving-man • What is meaning of negative position or velocity? • What is the meaning of negative acceleration? (careful, it’s tricky) • Explore Position, Velocity and Acceleration graphs in time. Physics review
  21. 21. Review on Motion - some thought questions What causes object to move? What causes objects to accelerate? What helps object stay put? How does energy affect motion? Physics review
  22. 22. 3rd Law: Action-Reaction To any force, there is an equal and opposite reaction force. 2nd Law: Force causes Acceleration (net) Force = mass × acceleration 1st Law: Law of Inertia An object would remain at rest or move in a straight line at constant speed unless acted upon by an external (net) force. Newton’s Laws of MotionPhysics review
  23. 23. 1st Law: inertia An object would remain at rest or move in a straight line at constant speed unless acted upon by an external (net) force. Give an example! [ Spacecrafts] Physics review Newton’s Laws of Motion
  24. 24. 2nd Law: force causes acceleration (net) Force = mass × acceleration Give an example! Physics review Newton’s Laws of Motion
  25. 25. 3rd Law: Action-reaction To any applied force, there is an equal and opposite reaction force. [ the bug and the windshield - who has a better day? ] Give an example! Physics review Newton’s Laws of Motion
  26. 26. Review on Motion - Define MotionPhysics review ● Balance of forces https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/forces-and-motion-basics ● Moving Man (Plotting motion: Position vs. Time, Velocity vs. Time, Acceleration vs. Time) https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/legacy/moving-man ● Forces and motion (more advanced, forces as vectors, friction) https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/legacy/forces-and-motion https://phet.colorado.edu/
  27. 27. Applied vs. Net Force – PHET Simulation demo •Is there are force on you right now? Why aren’t you sinking? •How do you move across the room? •Explore: What is the force condition for equilibrium? •https://phet.colorado.edu/sims/html/forces-and-motion-basics/lates t/forces-and-motion-basics_en.html Physics review Review on Motion - Net Force Cause Acceleration
  28. 28. Safety precautions: Avoid placing materials near your mouth or eyes. Be aware of and handle sharp objects with care. Use materials appropriately.
  29. 29. Challenge 1: How far can a balloon rocket travel? •
  30. 30. think-pair -share
  31. 31. variables to consider ● ● ● ●
  32. 32. Challenge: How far can a balloon rocket travel? • • •
  33. 33. Challenge: How far can a balloon rocket travel? Team Controlled Variable: Average/mean of the trials Team 1 Team 2 Team 3 Team 4 Team 5 Team 6 Mean of the Means CALCULATOR: https://tinyurl.com/qc t6s9w
  34. 34. think-pair -share
  35. 35. What causes the balloon to move? What causes it to go further? Which one of Newton’s law is applicable here? Physics review
  36. 36. 3rd Law: Action-Reaction To any force, there is an equal and opposite reaction force. 2nd Law: Force causes Acceleration (net) Force = mass × acceleration 1st Law: Law of Inertia An object would remain at rest or move in a straight line at constant speed unless acted upon by an external (net) force. Newton’s Laws of MotionPhysics review
  37. 37. 3rd Law: Action-Reaction To any force, there is an equal and opposite reaction force. Let’s identify the Action-Reaction pair of forces between: 1. You and Earth 2. Earth and Moon 3. You push on a wall 4. You push a brick on the wall (no sliding) Newton’s 3rd Law of MotionPhysics review
  38. 38. Multi-modal vocabulary EXample: “Show me” app
  39. 39. hOw can we represent the important terms to help our students understand them better? ● Examples/Non-examples ● Analogies ● Drawings or visuals ● Actions, movement, simulations ● Songs or poems ● Frayer’s Model ● Models or sculptures
  40. 40. CHALLENGE 2: How easily can you pull an object across different surfaces?
  41. 41. BRICK (object) slide Rubber Band Scale:
  42. 42. CHALLENGE 2: How easily can you pull an object across different surfaces?
  43. 43. Challenge: brick/bowl slide REcord amount of force (grams) Team Surface 1 Surface 2 Surface 3 Team 1 Team 2 Team 3 Team 4 Team 5 Team 6 Mean of the Means CALCULATOR: https://tinyurl.com/qc t6s9w
  44. 44. Table talk
  45. 45. Forces of friction Physics review
  46. 46. Special force: FrictionPhysics review Friction depends on the normal force (the force perpendicular to the surface) How does weight affect friction? Two forces of Friction: Kinetic (motion) friction vs. Static (no motion) friction What happens when you sand a surface with sandpaper? What happens when you rub your hands? To answer use: PHET Simulation: https://phet.colorado.edu/sims/html/friction/latest/friction_en.html
  47. 47. hOw can we represent the vocabulary words to help students understand & remember them better?● Examples/Non-examples ● Analogies ● Drawings or visuals ● Actions, movement, simulations ● Songs or poems ● Frayer’s Model ● Models or sculptures
  48. 48. Literature can serve as a springboard to scientific exploration
  49. 49. Curriculum materials: NEW STEM RESOURCES
  50. 50. Challenge 3: How could you design a balloon car that...
  51. 51. Think about it…. Walk and talk
  52. 52. Challenge 3: How could you design a balloon car?
  53. 53. Table talk
  54. 54. Challenge 3: examples of a balloon car •
  55. 55. KEEp trying….perseverance
  56. 56. Challenge 4: How does a ballistic car work? ● ● ● ●
  57. 57. Challenge 4: ballistic car Team Attempt 1: Distance Attempt 2: Distance Attempt 3: Distance Team 1 Team 2 Team 3 Team 4 Team 5 Team 6 Mean of All Teams CALCULATOR: https://tinyurl.com/qc t6s9w
  58. 58. Table talk
  59. 59. PROJECTILE MOTION: Kinematics in 2D Physics review Projectile motion - COMPADRE http://www.compadre.org/portal/items/detail.cfm?ID=3490 Projectile motion - PHET https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/legacy/projectile-motion
  60. 60. • A projectile is an object moving in two dimensions under the influence of Earth’s gravity • its path is a parabola. PROJECTILE MOTION: Kinematics in 2D Physics review
  61. 61. •Vertical • Acceleration due to GRAVITY •Horizontal: • NO acceleration PROJECTILE MOTION = Vertical motion + Horizontal Motion Physics review
  62. 62. Kinematics Equations for Projectile Motion Treat the motion in x- and y-direction separately! Physics review
  63. 63. Teach Projectile MotioN with angry birds LABPhysics review Angry birds - projectile motion analysis - COMPADRE ACTIVITY http://www.compadre.org/portal/items/detail.cfm?ID=11562 CODING ACTIVITY - create angry bird kind of game https://www.tynker.com/hour-of-code/physics-cannon-2-player
  64. 64. Challenge 5: Defining Gravity Using Spring Scales ● Spring scales with weights (gravity) -DEMO - https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/legacy/mass-spring-lab
  65. 65. Measuring Mass With Springs In this activity you will investigate the physical science of various masses and springs. 1. Click this link: http://phet.colorado.edu/ This is a screen shot of the website:
  66. 66. Exploration Phase 1. Place various objects on the springs 2. Freely explore the effect of (1) adding friction, (2) making the spring softer and harder, and (3) changing the force of gravity (i.e., the planet). Questions: 1. What happens to a spring when a lighter object is added to it? 2. What happens to a spring when a heavier object is added to it? 3. Explain why you think this happens.
  67. 67. Explanation Phase Use the sim and fill in the blanks of the following table for 3 different conditions of the springs. Use the draggable ruler provided to make measurements. The ruler should be aligned with the reference line as seen below. Generate a rule for the length of the spring when a mass is added to it based on the completed chart (i.e., reference point).
  68. 68. Use your rule to complete the chart below. Apply (theoretically) to other scenarios Test (experimentally) one scenario to confirm
  69. 69. Freely Falling Objects Near the surface of the Earth, all objects experience approximately the same acceleration due to gravity. Motion with constant acceleration Physics review
  70. 70. In the absence of air resistance, ALL objects fall with the same acceleration, although this may be hard to tell by testing in an environment where there is air resistance. Freely Falling Objects Physics review
  71. 71. The Universal Law of Gravitation (Why Universal?) •Weight = net force on object •If at rest, weight = force of gravity on the object: W = mg •g = 10 m/s2 only applies near the surface of the Earth •your weight in outer space? •your weight on the Moon? •your weight on the Sun? Physics review
  72. 72. What does Gravity depend on? (Q2: what does your weight depend on?) • Consider two masses, m1 and m2 . • They are separated by distance r. • The mutual Force of gravity is: Answer: • Your mass • Radius of planet • Mass of planet Physics review
  73. 73. High-g experience • At 4-6g’s most people black out • Astronauts train to endure 9g’s • Roller coaster ~ 3g’s • Formula 1 drivers upto 5g’s • Might survive 45g’s? • At 50g’s, your organs are soup Physics review
  74. 74. Mass vs. Weight What does it mean to be weightless? => in free-fall (only gravity acting on you) Physics review
  75. 75. video: Free Fall on moonPhysics review - Astronaut David Scott (Apollo 15) proved Galileo right - video of dropping hammer/feather on the Moon 1. Make a prediction 2. Watch the video (1 min): http://tinyurl.com/yaoqgtzk 3. Compare results with prediction 4. Discuss why?
  76. 76. Phet simulation: Countering GravityPhysics review Lunar Lander (fun game) https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/legacy/lunar-lander
  77. 77. hOw can we represent the vocabulary words to help students understand & remember them better?● Examples/Non-examples ● Analogies ● Drawings or visuals ● Actions, movement, simulations ● Songs or poems ● Frayer’s Model ● Models or sculptures
  78. 78. Think about it…. Walk and talk HHow could you represent word “gravity” so your students could better understand & remember it?
  79. 79. Curriculum resource https://tinyurl.com/yb8fxgk9
  80. 80. Challenge 6: How can you make a candy corn catapult? ● ● ● ●
  81. 81. How can you make a candy corn catapult?
  82. 82. How can you make a candy corn catapult?
  83. 83. How can you make a candy corn catapult?
  84. 84. Think about it… Stand up, hand up, pair up ➔ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i u49gV-fefE Challenge 6:
  85. 85. Think about it… Stand up, hand up, pair up ➔ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i u49gV-fefE ➔ Predict how far your catapult will fling the candy corn. ➔ Explain your prediction.
  86. 86. Challenge: Candy corn results Team Attempt 1: Average Distance Attempt 2: Average Distance Team 1 Team 2 Team 3 Team 4 Team 5 Team 6 Mean of the Means CALCULATOR: https://tinyurl.com/qc t6s9w
  87. 87. Let’s try it…..
  88. 88. Challenge 7: ball on a roll/rollercoaster ●
  89. 89. Step 1: ball on a roll
  90. 90. Steps 2 & 3: ball on a roll
  91. 91. Steps 4, & 5: ball on a roll
  92. 92. How does the ball’s height on the ramp affect the distance it rolls?
  93. 93. How does the ball’s height on the ramp affect the distance it rolls? ● ●
  94. 94. CURRICULUM RESOURCE: Picture Perfect Science:
  95. 95. Challenge 8: rollercoaster challenge ● Have you ever been on a rollercoaster? ● What was it like? Watch video of rollercoaster ride: (3 minutes) ● Think of words that describe the experience: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_lcZcBcQ0o
  96. 96. Rollercoaster
  97. 97. Challenge 8: construct a Rollercoaster
  98. 98. Challenge 8: rollercoaster challenge Using what we’ve learned today, let’s design a roller coaster. Cup challenge in groups of 4 or 5 (orange track with cup taped to the end) ● What do you think the cup is for? ● Can you make the car roll from one end of the track and stop in the cup? ● Can you make the car roll faster? ● Can you make the car roll more slowly? ● Can you make the car roll go over a hill on your roller coaster? ● Can you make the car roll go over two hills? ● Can you make the car roll go through a hoop?
  99. 99. Curriculum resource: NewselaR eading in Science https://newsela.com/ ● Free articles (need to create an account) ● Articles can be adjusted (i.e., readability level) to differentiate for diverse learners Example: Newsela Rollercoaster article ● http://tinyurl.com/y8h7x2lo
  100. 100. ROLLERCOASTER PHYSICS Mechanical energy: Kinetic and Potential Physics review
  101. 101. 112 Physics review
  102. 102. Energy converts from one type to another Physics review Energy Conservation
  103. 103. Energy Skate Park - PHET Simulation Demo (Bar and Pie Charts!) •https://phet.colorado.edu/sims/html/energy-skate-park-basics/latest /energy-skate-park-basics_en.html •Does the final height of the skater depend on his/her mass? •Does the final height of the skater depend on friction? •Can the skater reach final height higher than his/her initial height? •When does the skater move the fastest? •When does the skater move the slowest? Physics review
  104. 104. Think about it… Stand up, hand up, pair up ➔ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iu49gV-fefE What is something you are excited to try in your classroom?
  105. 105. “Plicker” Post-Assessment
  106. 106. References and Resources Even More Picture-Perfect Science Lesson K-5: Using Children’s Books to Guide Inquiry by Emily Morgan & Karen Ansberry (2013, National Science Teachers Association Press) More Picture Perfect Science Lessons: Using Children's Books to Guide Inquiry, K-4 (Morgan & Ansberry, 2007). Includes 15 ready-to-use science lessons stemming from children’s literature books. Picture-Perfect Science Lessons - Expanded 2nd Edition: Using Children's Books to Guide Inquiry, 3-6 (Morgan & Ansberry, 2010). Includes 15 ready-to-use science lessons stemming from children’s literature books.
  107. 107. References and Resources Picture Perfect STEM Lessons, 3-5: Using Children’s Books to Inspire Science Learning by Emily Morgan & Karen Ansberry (2017, National Science Teachers Association Press) The Inventor’ Secret by Suzanne Slade (2015, Charlesbridge) Rosie Revere, Engineer by Andrea Beaty(2013, Charlesbridge) Popping with Power: Physical Science Activities Integrating Math and Science (2004, AIMS Education Foundation) pp. 34-39; 40-48; 70-77. Newsela. https://newsela.com/
  108. 108. Module 2: FORCE, MOTION, & ENERGY Before Next Workshop…. Post your responses to the following: 1. Did the workshop help you better understand and learn electrical concepts and how to teach them? Explain. 2. What aspects of the workshop were most helpful to you? 3. What suggestions (if any) do you have for future workshops? 4. Select and implement 2+ of the technology tools introduced during Workshop #2 to teach electrical or other scientific concepts in your classroom (i.e., inside/outside circle, iPad or iPhone apps, PHeT simulations, Newsela, ballistic car, hands-on materials). a. Describe how you used the activity/technology and what scientific concept you taught in your classroom. b. How successful would you consider the instruction/materials in teaching students the scientific concept in your classroom? How do you know? Provide evidence of student learning (i.e., students’ responses, assessment data, etc…) c. What adjustments/suggestions would you make for future instruction? d. What is your personal goal for future science instruction and what support do you need to meet your goal?

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