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MOMM

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MOMM

  1. 1. Resolutions: MOMM Minimization Of Maternal Mortality Sponsors: Pakistan, United States, Argentina, Indonesia, Jordan, Oman, Signatories: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Bolivia, Chad, Cote d’Ivoire, Maldives, Chile, Uganda, Mali, Panama, Denmark, Algeria, Azerbaijan, Ghana The United Nation General Assembly, Reaffirming the Millennium Development Goals relating to gender equality, minimizing infant, child, and maternal mortality and morbidity, Seeing that each day, approximately 800 women die due to preventable, treatable, or curable maternal-related complications, Recognizing that maternal and infant morbidity and mortality creates problems for all peoples, and that it is imperative to stop it, and that it is exacerbated by factors such as poverty, gender inequality, as well as factors such as lack of access to adequate health facilities and technology, and lack of infrastructure, Noting that insufficient water provision is a leading factor in maternal mortality, Recognizing that poor nutrition is a major factor contributing to poor maternal health, Affirming that morbidity could be decreased through greater access to midwives, Affirming that, in many cases, maternal mortality could be prevented through greater access to health care facilities, Welcoming efforts by NGOs, such as the International Council of Women, Oxfam, the International Red Cross, and others, in combating maternal health complications, Congratulating developing nations on decreasing maternal morbidity in recent years, Noting the recent declaration by the African Union that this is the “Decade of Women,” Acknowledging that HIV and AIDS is a significant contributor to the steep maternal mortality rates,
  2. 2. Reaffirming that religious and cultural beliefs play a significant role in the decision-making processes in various nations and communities with regards to the topic of maternal health, Realizing that men, in many developing countries, may play a significant role in household decision-making and thus emphasizing the importance of their education regarding maternal health issues, Noting the recent release of Novartis’s Tocitron “anti-bleeding” drug, as a possible, potential solution to postpartum bleeding, Expressing grave concern at the unacceptably high global rate of preventable maternal mortality and morbidity, noting in this regard that the World Health Organization has assessed that over 1,500 women and girls die every day as a result of preventable complications occurring before, during and after pregnancy and childbirth, and that, globally, maternal mortality is the leading cause of death among women and of girls of reproductive age, Referring to the Beijing Declaration and Framework for Action, and the Convention for the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, Reaffirming also that Women’s Rights are Human Rights and stand as an indivisible concept, Recalling the importance of maternal health in the betterment of human welfare as outlined in Goal 5 of the Millennium Development Goals, Recognizing that discrimination and inequality in the distribution of maternal healthcare stands as a major obstacle to the effective reduction of the mortality rate, Emphasizing that awareness of human rights is crucial to combating discrimination and inequality, Praising the efforts of the UNHCR and NGOs such as Amnesty international in providing continual reports on the human right’s status of women in the globe, Understanding that the issue of maternal health is fundamentally linked to human rights, as reported by the HRC report 14/39 which emphasized the importance of combating discrimination against women and girls in the fight against maternal mortality, Noting that only a solution which takes into account the human rights ramifications of health distribution schemes will will ensure a just and more equitable world for all women,
  3. 3. Realizing that the discrimination prevalent against women in ethnic minorities, indigenous groups, and the impoverished has prevented the provision of equitable aid to these groups, Understanding that in many parts of the world indigenous groups and struggling communities, are apprehensive about outside organizations, Referring to the Beijing Declaration and Framework for Action, and the Convention for the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women. Reaffirming also that Women’s Rights are Human Rights and stand as an indivisible concept, Recalling the importance of maternal health in the betterment of human welfare as outlined in Goal 5 of the Millennium Development Goals, Recognizing that discrimination and inequality in the distribution of maternal healthcare stands as a major obstacle to the effective reduction of the mortality rate, Emphasizing that awareness of human rights is crucial to combating discrimination and inequality, Praising the efforts of the UNHCR and NGOs such as Amnesty international in providing continual reports on the human right’s status of women in the globe, Understanding that the issue of maternal health is fundamentally linked to human rights, as reported by the HRC report 14/39 which emphasized the importance of combating discrimination against women and girls in the fight against maternal mortality, Noting that only a solution which takes into account the human rights ramifications of health distribution schemes will will ensure a just and more equitable world for all women, Realizing that the discrimination prevalent against women in ethnic minorities, indigenous groups, and the impoverished has prevented the provision of equitable aid to these groups, Understanding that in many parts of the world indigenous groups and struggling communities, are apprehensive about outside organizations, 1. Recommends the creation of a standard unique to each member state for midwife certification
  4. 4. a. Encourages NGOs, specifically those given “Consultative Status” by the United Nations Economic and Social Council, help states develop efficient training procedures for midwives so they are able to follow this standard b. Requests the development of an international, scientific standard towards the certification, determined by the World Health Organization, while ensuring that such a standard does not conflict with cultural, religious, and local practices c. Affirms that no current midwives would be stripped of their status, but nevertheless highly recommends that they, too, receive training so they are up to date with new developments in the field, as well as recent technological improvements; 2. Recommends the more efficient use of existing infrastructure in lesser developed countries, with the main focus on decreasing the burden on already existing public and private health care providing institutions within lesser developed economies, through the following measures, a. Recommends funding from the existing United Nations budget, the WHO and welcomes funding from NGOs such as the International Council of Women and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, to promote the use of new, more effective and efficient technology, including birthing kits, backpack ultrasounds, Oxytocin injections, and mobile health centers b. Believes that increased efficiency of the healthcare system can also be achieved through the proliferation of trained and properly educated midwives (in accordance with the standards proposed in Clause 1) in rural areas dedicated to the application of proper biological and nutritional care with regards to the topic of maternal health; i. Expressed a hope for the development of a sustainable chain of healthcare provision, spanning from rural areas equipped with the most basic capital and labor necessary for a ordinary maternal birth, to towns and then cities, equipped with increasingly advanced capital and labor necessary to deal with higher trauma cases; ii. Strongly recommends states guarantee access to a midwife or hospital through following this hierarchy, based on the woman’s condition during pregnancy, thereby relieving the stress on already existing health care institutions; 3. Requests that the United Nations Economic and Social Council provide additional funds, in part donated by the Sultanate of Oman and other willing member states, to broaden its “Consultative Status” program for NGOs in order to: a. Increase the capacity of the most effective aid-providing NGOs;
  5. 5. b. Investigate NGOs which, due to their good works and efficacy, qualify for Consultative Status, thus increasing the scope of organizations which are taking measurably effective measures to aid in maternal health care; 4. Requests that NGOs, particularly those given Consultative Status, as well as dedicated United Nations established bodies, use funding as outlined in Clause 3 in order to provide a. Preventative and diagnostic techniques for common ailments, which put maternal and natal health at risk, with special regards to immunization, supplementation, and prevention of HIV transmission. i. Worldwide coverage is necessary to provide tetanus toxoid vaccine, iron and folic acid supplements for anemia, and detection technology for pregnancy complications; b. Childcare professionals who can advise new parents on proper health needs for their children; c. Tocitron dosages to those communities where bleeding constitutes a significant barrier to a health labor process; 5. Encourages the education of both men and women regarding to pre- and post-natal care to increase awareness, through distribution by local health clinics, as outlined in Clause 2 by a. Equipping midwives to share their knowledge to pregnant women, mothers, and men as a part of their training so that others, too, are aware of the factors impacting maternal health; b. Employing public advertising campaigns to emphasize the trust which should be given to trained healthcare professionals, which include but are not limited to both midwives and doctors; c. Targeting men, in conjunction with women, in this campaign in order to give them the tools and knowledge necessary to make proper financial and personal decisions regarding pre-natal care, post-natal care, and the cost associated with a child’s upbringing; d. Educating the youth in primary school as to the potential difficulties of having children when they cannot be supported monetarily, emotionally, and educationally, e. Encouraging the involvement of women in the healthcare industry by helping educate women trying to become midwives, nurses, or doctors 6. Calls upon the efforts of developed countries to further research the new Tocitron drug developed by Novartis Pharmaceuticals, with specific goals of
  6. 6. a. Developing mass production/continuous process methods to decrease the production costs so as to render it more affordable in the developing nations, where it is needed most b. Testing further the short-term and long-term safety implications of the drug through already established drug regulatory bodies c. Partnering and communicating with various pre-existing international bodies with focuses on health, including but not limited to the World Health Organization, the International Council of Women, Oxfam, the UNICEF Children’s Fund, and Red Cross. 7. Reminds states that human rights are an integral part of maternal health and that each nation has an obligation to provide the material support necessary for women to enjoy to the rights to life, dignity, education, freedom from discrimination, and the freedom to attain the highest possible level of physical and mental health 8. Calls upon nations to review and revise when necessary the existing legal framework of national healthcare policies to ensure that they are in line with the principles outlined by the Convention on the Elimination on All Forms of Discrimination Against Women a. Specifically, through the creation of an ongoing, biennial domestic committee established by all participating members to review legal codes with specific intent to highlight discrimination against women to the benefit of all nations law-makers and encourage responsive action to better the rights and conditions of women 9. Recommends that states adhere to the report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the issue of Maternal Health and formulate any and all future policy with human rights firmly in mind a. Further builds on prior doctrines such as the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights by reaffirming the requirement of participating states to take steps to achieve those rights to the maximum of their available resources b. Calls attention to the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR) which has has further emphasized that “a State Party cannot, under any circumstances whatsoever, justify its non-compliance with the core obligations … which are non-derogable” 10. Further recommends that states incorporate human rights education into national and local curriculums with the expressed goal of raising awareness for women’s rights and awareness for the rights of all humans 11. Requests that the OHCHR and the UNHCR continues to monitor violations of human rights with regards to women’s rights and maternal health:
  7. 7. a. Specifically requests that these organizations and agencies provide quarterly reports per nation to ensure that violations of women’s rights is treated with the same degree of severity as other human rights violations 12. Recommends that the World Trade Organization works and negotiates with national governments and pharmaceutical companies to ensure that the “miracle drug” can be made available at the lowest possible cost to national healthcare programmes and healthcare providers a. Specifically by providing guidance and support for developing nations seeking to create their own pathways from which to gain access to the drug at an affordable rate 13. Urges the possibility of reaching out towards religious communities and seeking the support of religious leaders to inform indigenous communities about the importance of sex education and maternal health

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