O slideshow foi denunciado.
Seu SlideShare está sendo baixado. ×

Understanding the strategies of influencer businesses -the case of Finland

Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio

Confira estes a seguir

1 de 11 Anúncio

Understanding the strategies of influencer businesses -the case of Finland

Baixar para ler offline

Influencers and social media content creators and new kinds of intermediary companies positioned between influencers, advertisers and platforms represent a growing part of the Finnish creative industry workforce.

These new media industry companies have been able to benefit from the emergence of platforms, and show growing revenues, unlike the incumbent media businesses, which have suffered from the loss of ad revenue for the first two decades of the new millennia.

While influencer marketing is a fast-growing sub-category of social media marketing, not much is known within media studies of the strategies of influencer industry actors.

Influencers and social media content creators and new kinds of intermediary companies positioned between influencers, advertisers and platforms represent a growing part of the Finnish creative industry workforce.

These new media industry companies have been able to benefit from the emergence of platforms, and show growing revenues, unlike the incumbent media businesses, which have suffered from the loss of ad revenue for the first two decades of the new millennia.

While influencer marketing is a fast-growing sub-category of social media marketing, not much is known within media studies of the strategies of influencer industry actors.

Anúncio
Anúncio

Mais Conteúdo rRelacionado

Mais de Tuija Aalto (20)

Mais recentes (20)

Anúncio

Understanding the strategies of influencer businesses -the case of Finland

  1. 1. Understanding the strategies of influencer businesses – the case of Finland Conference presentation at the Promotional media workshop, Department of Media Studies, Stockholm University in Stockholm, December 1-2, 2022 DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.31513.29282. Tuija Aalto PhD. Candidate (Doctor of Social Sciences), University of Tampere Faculty of Information Technology and Communication Sciences / Journalism | 1
  2. 2. 11.5.2022 | 2 A new industry ● The Influencer industry (Abidin et al 2020) emerged during the 2010’s, enabled by social media platform affordances. ● Influencing as media business practice per se vs. celebrities relating to fans on social media (relational work, see Baym, 2015). Connection to TV and film industries’ audience building.
  3. 3. 11.5.2022 | 3 ● Platformisation, the rise of the platform as the dominant infrastructural and/or economic model in media, electronic communications and ICT sectors (Evens & Donders 2018) ● Platformisation of cultural production (Poell et al 2021) ○ Institutional aspects (markets, infrastructure and governance) ○ cultural practices (labour, creative, and democratic practices).
  4. 4. 11.5.2022 | 4 The main types of influencer industry actors ● Cultural intermediaries ○ mediating between advertisers, platforms and influencers: multi-channel-networks or MCN’s, (in Finland since 2014); influencer agencies ● Cultural producers ○ new companies founded by social media content creators and influencers ○ Established media companies.
  5. 5. 11.5.2022 | 5 Method: will interview influencers and influencer agency managers and apply qualitative content analysis to the interview transcriptions. ● A total of 25-30 semi structured interviews ● Analysis of the interviews with the grounded theory approach first, themes emerging from the data.
  6. 6. 11.5.2022 | 6 The relationships between influencers and broadcasters show up most prominently in my preliminary findings ● As the influencers and creators have demonstrated their ability to produce audiences, they are an interesting resource to media companies as gatekeepers to young audiences
  7. 7. 11.5.2022 | 7 Tentative preliminary findings ● Traditional broadcasters and influencers engage in the exchange of visibility in ways that benefit both: ○ Traditional media companies gain access to the relational capital of influencers, ○ Influencers may be able to raise their prices ● Influencers may gain entry to the IPR-based, platform independent businesses of TV and VOD.
  8. 8. 11.5.2022 | 8 The perceived power of social media creators or influencers to “move audiences” has opened some of them opportunities to ● be cast as guests and hosts of TV or radio shows on broadcast channels ● enter the IPR industries (producing records, books, TV/VOD series titles or exclusive podcast deals) I propose to call this power “relational capital”.
  9. 9. 11.5.2022 | 9 The relationships between influencers and influencer agencies ● it seems that the influencers have strong negotiation power ● the influencer agencies have re-invented their business models ○ strategic consulting for brands ○ project-based relationships with influencers.
  10. 10. 11.5.2022 | 10 ○ To summarise, cultural producers, influencers and broadcasters benefit from promotional collaboration ○ while the cultural intermediaries find themselves in rather precarious position and must constantly renew themselves.
  11. 11. tuija.aalto@tuni.fi Twitter: @Tuija

×