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Chapter 7 power point

  1. 1. © Cengage Learning 2016© Cengage Learning 2016 An Invitation to Health: Building Your Future, Brief Edition, 9e Dianne Hales The Joy of Fitness 7
  2. 2. © Cengage Learning 2016 After reading this chapter, the student should be able to: • Explain the relationship between the dimensions of health and physical fitness • Summarize the health risks of inactivity and the need for physical exercise • Outline the government’s physical activity recommendations Objectives
  3. 3. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Discuss the overload, FITT, and reversibility principles of exercise • Specify methods to improve cardiovascular fitness • Explain the significance of muscular fitness • Compare static and dynamic flexibility Objectives (cont’d.)
  4. 4. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Summarize the benefits of mind–body approaches to physical fitness and wellness • Identify the causes and treatment of low back pain • Discuss the nutritional requirements of athletes • Specify the precautions for preventing exercise-related problems Objectives (cont’d.)
  5. 5. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Ability to meet daily energy needs • Energy reserves to handle unexpected physical demands • Protecting yourself from potential health problems What Is Physical Fitness?
  6. 6. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Cardiorespiratory fitness – Heart’s ability to pump blood effectively • Metabolic fitness • Muscular strength and endurance • Flexibility – Joint range of motion • Body composition – Relative amounts of fat and lean tissue Components of Physical Fitness
  7. 7. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Exercise involves planned, structured body movement – Intent: improve physical fitness • Many benefits of exercise – Examples: stronger heart, denser bones, more efficient digestion, and increased metabolism – Physical activity increases life span by 1.3 to 5.5 years Physical Activity and Exercise
  8. 8. © Cengage Learning 2016
  9. 9. © Cengage Learning 2016 • All adults should avoid inactivity • Exercise recommendations for adults – 150 minutes a week moderate-intensity – 75 minutes high-intensity – Increase aerobic to 300 minutes per week – Muscle strengthening two or more days per week Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans
  10. 10. © Cengage Learning 2016 • The body adjusts to meet physical demands • Overload principle – Provide a greater stress on the body than usual – Increase the demands progressively – Specific to each body part independently The Principles of Exercise
  11. 11. © Cengage Learning 2016
  12. 12. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Acronym for dimensions of progressive overload – Frequency – Intensity – Time • Duration of exercise, particularly cardiorespiratory – Type • Which body parts are stressed FITT
  13. 13. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Types of exercise – Aerobic • Improves cardiorespiratory endurance – Anaerobic • Usually short term, high-intensity • Amount of oxygen taken in cannot meet activity demands • Creates oxygen deficit • Measuring heart rate: method to monitor intensity Improving Cardiorespiratory Fitness
  14. 14. © Cengage Learning 2016
  15. 15. © Cengage Learning 2016
  16. 16. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Muscular strength – Maximum force a muscle or muscle group can generate for one movement • Muscular endurance – Capacity to sustain repeated muscle actions • Low muscle strength – Emerging risk factor for major causes of death in young adults Building Muscular Fitness
  17. 17. © Cengage Learning 2016
  18. 18. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Static flexibility – Ability to assume and maintain a position at the end of a joint’s range of motion • Dynamic flexibility – Ability to move a joint quickly and fluidly through entire range of motion • Some benefits of flexibility – Injury prevention, relief of muscle strain and soreness after exercise, relaxation, and improved posture Becoming More Flexible
  19. 19. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Some benefits of yoga – Improved flexibility – Stronger, denser bones – Enhanced circulation – Stress relief • Pilates – Strengthening the core muscles • T’ai Chi – Meditation in motion Mind-Body Approaches
  20. 20. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Low back pain a leading cause of disability – More women than men affected – Most common between ages 20-55 • Low back pain treatment approaches – Physical therapy – Anti-inflammatory medication – Strengthening the core muscles Keeping Your Back Healthy
  21. 21. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Athletes have increased energy requirements – Carbohydrates particularly important – Including the right types of fat can improve athletic performance • Exercise three to four hours after a large meal – One to two hours after a small one • Water is especially important Sports Nutrition
  22. 22. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Get proper instruction • Use good equipment • Warm up and cool down • Use protective equipment • Take each outing seriously • Never combine alcohol or drugs with sport • Be alert to temperature symptoms Safe and Healthy Workouts

Notas do Editor

  • Figure 7.1 The benefits of exercise
  • Figure 7.2 The overload principle
  • Figure 7.3 Revised scale for rating of perceived exertion (RPE)
  • Figure 7.4 Recommended cardiorespiratory or aerobic training pattern
  • Figure 7.5 Benefits of strength training on the body

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