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GEC+ 2016: Anders Rasmussen

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Anders Rasmussen, Team Leader, Danish Foundation for Entrepreneurship - Young Enterprise, on Measuring the Impact of Entrepreneurship Education

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GEC+ 2016: Anders Rasmussen

  1. 1. How to measure the impact of different approaches to entrepreneurship education at different levels of education Anders Rasmussen, MA educational sociology Fonden for Entreprenørskab
  2. 2. o On behalf off my colleague: o Kaare Moberg, PhD, Quantitative Researcher at the Danish Foundation for Entrepreneurship since 2011 o Dissertation at CBS in 2014 o The Impact of different approaches to EE – from ABC to PhD
  3. 3. Agenda o Assesment and evaluation tools – OctoSkills o The effects of education about and through o Q’s (maybe no A’s) 4
  4. 4. OctoSkills 2 Did you become entrepreneurial ?
  5. 5. More entrepreneurs or more enterprising individuals? 6 Learning goals and didactical principles
  6. 6. About, For or Through Entrepreneurship 5 o About: Strong focus on cognitively-oriented e’ship skills. Easy to teach in a classroom and to many pupils and students o For: Strong focus on cognitively-oriented e’ship skills, but often also focus on e’ship skills of a more non-cognitive character. Often very resource intensive to teach o Through: Focus on e’ship skills of a more non-cognitive character. Can be embedded in a cross-curricular manner
  7. 7. Cognitive and Non-cognitiv entrepreneurial skills 5 Cognitively-oriented e’ship skills typically include a high level of declarative knowledge. These skills are easy to codify and examine. Our educational system has a long tradition of focusing on teaching these skills (the Science of entrepreneurship). oEvaluate business ideas, business plan writing, financial literacy E’ship skills of a more non-cognitive charcter are often viewed as character abilities and social skills. These skills are hard to codify and test with standardized tests. oCreativity, managing uncertainty, marshal resources (the Art of entrepreneurship)
  8. 8. Different approaches, different learning goals 5 o In order to evaluate and assess the influence of different approaches to EE it is important that there is a lot of different outcome variables included in the assessment tool o Based our assessment tool on Albert Banduras concept of self- efficacy o Focus on pupils’ and students’ confidence in performing both cognitively-oriented e’ship skills (Planning, Financial literacy) and e’ship skills of a more non-cognitive character (Creativity, Resource Marshalling, Managing Uncertainty)
  9. 9. The ASTEE project 5 o Refined and developed the instrument in collaboration with six European partners and tested the instrument in 13 countries at all levels of education (primary, secondary, tertiary) www.asteeprojet.eu o Focus on entrepreneurial attitudes and intention o But also on school engagement, educational motivation and perceived teacher support o Turned into the evaluation app: OctoSkills
  10. 10. OctoSkills 14 www.octoskills.com Did you become entrepreneurial ?
  11. 11. 3 Cognitive skills Non- Cognitive skills Ent. attitudes Motivation School engagement Relations Class mates Teachers Self- Esteem
  12. 12. Practice 15 Creat ivity Busin ess Mind set ESE Atti tudes Team work School enga. Teac her Class mates Mot. Ext. Inno vation INT Mot. Int.
  13. 13. The effects of education about and through entrepreneurship at secondary level of education o The Danish Foundation for Entrepreneurship – Young Enterprise has since 2011 collected data on randomly selected pupils at secondary level of education o Each year we collect data on 2000 randomly selected 9th–graders who we then follow up on each year as a longitudinal study
  14. 14. Secondary-level: Cross-sectional analysis 9th graders Business skills Enterprising skills Entrepreneurial Intentions School Engagement + + - -
  15. 15. 10th and 11th-12th graders Business skills Enterprising skills Intentions School Engagement + + - - Males Males Business skills Enterprising skills Intentions School Engagement + + - Males Males Insig.
  16. 16. Secondary-level: Cross-sectional mediation analysis 9th graders Business skills Enterprising skills Entrepreneurial Intentions School Engagement + + - - + Males Males Insig. Perceived Teachers Support
  17. 17. What fosters school engagement? 2 3 1 Whether or not the learning climate is supportive and encouraging (Battistich, Solomon, Kim, Watson & Schaps, 1995) According to Newman (1991), educational tasks should meet five requirements in order to promote engagement in learning. they should be: (1) fun; (2) authentic; (3) collaborative; (4) provide opportunities for pupils to assume ownership of their conception (5) permit diverse forms of talents The most important factors to foster school engagement are whether or not the pupils perceive their education as purposeful (Connell, Gambone & Smith, 2000; Whitlock, 2006)
  18. 18. What creates motivation? 2 3 1 o Skill variety. Require many different skillsets (Alleman & Brophy, 1993, 1994) o Task identity: Identify with the assignment, from A to Z, see the results (Lave & Wenger, 1991) o Task significance: Is there an impact? Value? Appreciation? (Wentzel & Brophy, 2013)
  19. 19. 19 Q’s !!! Thank you! www.octoskills.com Kaare@ffe-ye.dk www.ffe-ye.dk Anders@ffe-ye.dk 16

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