O slideshow foi denunciado.
Utilizamos seu perfil e dados de atividades no LinkedIn para personalizar e exibir anúncios mais relevantes. Altere suas preferências de anúncios quando desejar.
Asian Architecture [ARC 60403 /2234]
PROJECT 1: Case Study
NAME:
LEE YIH 0318340
LOH WEI SHUEN 0317896
LOVIE TEY YI QING 0...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 2
The Reinterpretation of Courtyard in the Spatial Planning of Three
Courtyard Communi...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 3
ABSTRACT
Base on the case study on Three Courtyard Community Centre in China, this p...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 4
second part of this research paper includes discussion dedicated to how the building...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 5
INTRODUCTION
China, one of the oldest civilization with histories that could date ba...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 6
1900 sqm. The Community Centre was designed by Zhang Lei from AZL Architects, and
wa...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 7
CHAPTER 1: AN OVERVIEW OF CHINESE TRADITIONAL COURTYARD
HOUSE
In China, the most typ...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 8
One of the notable feature of Courtyard houses is that the building is fully enclose...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 9
axis. It is then divided into two parts where the front is used for receiving guest ...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 10
The spaces are arranged based on the principles of balance and symmetry. Symmetry
i...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 11
CHAPTER 2: CONTEXTUAL RESPONSE OF THE THREE COURTYARD
COMMUNITY CENTRE
The Three Co...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 12
Figure 2.1 – Location plan of Shilidian village.
To mimic the Chinese small village...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 13
Traditional courtyard houses are often built as one-storey buildings in China, due ...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 14
CHAPTER 3: THE ADAPTATION IN THREE COURTYARD COMMUNITY
CENTRE
Figure 3.1 - Floor pl...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 15
To access each building, one has to go through a double entrance, creating a
layeri...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 16
CHAPTER 4: COMPARISON BETWEEN SPATIAL PLANNING
TRADITIONAL COURTYARD HOUSE AND THRE...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 17
Figure 4.3 - Site plan of Three Courtyard Community Centre.
Source: Archdaily, 2011...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 18
New element is added to the creation and development of Three Courtyard
Community C...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 19
Figure 4.8 - Lattice-like brick pattern.
Source: Flickr, 2016.
Figure 4.7 - Interwo...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 20
CHAPTER 5: IMPACT ON THE LOCAL COMMUNITY OF YANG ZHOU
CITY
The Community Centre is ...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 21
both public and private functions for the local community to use, by creating multi...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 22
the best representation of contemporary architecture influenced by the traditional ...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 23
CONCLUSION
In order to pull a balance in the context between the ever developing mo...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 24
REFERENCES
AZL architects: Three courtyards community center. (2013). Retrieved Oct...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 25
neighborhoods centres. Retreived Octorber 11, 2016 from
http://www.communityindicat...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 26
ARC 60403 / 2234 ASIAN ARCHITECTURE
PROJECT 1 CASE STUDY PAPER
FINAL PAPER MARKING ...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 27
recommendati
ons
Many run-ons,
fragments and
awkward
phrasings
making it hard
to re...
[ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 28
Próximos SlideShares
Carregando em…5
×

ASIAN ARCHITECTURE - THREE COURTYARD COMMUNITY CENTRE CASE STUDY /

The reinterpretation of courtyard in the Spatial Planning of Three Courtyard Community Centre. In a group of 6, by using the same building from the contextual architecture study project, we are required to identify a specific topic / issues/ significance of study and defining the specific scope of study. We need to create a concept mapping, and it must include the proposed research title and research questions, in order to give an overview of the proposed case study paper.

  • Entre para ver os comentários

ASIAN ARCHITECTURE - THREE COURTYARD COMMUNITY CENTRE CASE STUDY /

  1. 1. Asian Architecture [ARC 60403 /2234] PROJECT 1: Case Study NAME: LEE YIH 0318340 LOH WEI SHUEN 0317896 LOVIE TEY YI QING 0318155 LOW EN HUEY 0317889 TAN JO LYNN 0318518 TIONG JIA MIN 0323763 LECTURER: MS. IDA SUBMISSION DATE: 29 NOVEMBER 2016 The Reinterpretation of Courtyard in the Spatial Planning of Three Courtyard Community Centre.
  2. 2. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 2 The Reinterpretation of Courtyard in the Spatial Planning of Three Courtyard Community Centre. TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE Abstract ............................................................................................... 3 - 4 Introduction .......................................................................................... 5 - 6 Chapter 1: An overview of Chinese Traditional Courtyard House ....... 7 - 10 Chapter 2: Contextual response of the Three Courtyard Community Centre ………………………………………….. 11 - 13 Chapter 3: The adaptation in Three Courtyard Community Centre .... 14 - 15 Chapter 4: Comparison between spatial planning of Traditional Courtyard House and Three Courtyard Community Centre …………………………………………..………..……. 16 - 19 Chapter 5: Impact on the Local Community of Yang Zhou City ………20 - 22 Conclusion ………………………………………………………………..... 23 References ……………………………………………………………...... 24 - 25
  3. 3. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 3 ABSTRACT Base on the case study on Three Courtyard Community Centre in China, this paper discusses the reinterpretation of Chinese vernacular architecture and its translation on modern days’ spatial layout of contemporary public building. It was intended to analyse the attempts of local architect, Zhang Lei in reconstructing the arrangement of traditional Chinese Courtyard House and his combination of other traditional architecture elements in enhancing the spatial experiences. Literature reviews based on electronic and hardcopy sources were conducted to examine studies on the original use of courtyard layout in residential during the early century. In order to provide a wider variation of research, case study were carried out on buildings within the macro and micro surrounding context to study the influential relationship between site context and spatial planning of the community centre. Based on researches and case studies, the site of Three Courtyard Community Centre is located between a modern industrial area and an undeveloped agricultural site with local villages nearby. It is also flourished with history over 2500 years old of the Grand Canal nearby and hence it was crucial for the design of a public building to strike a balance between characteristics of the historical Chinese and the modernity in present China days. In conclusion, this paper discuses the suitable adaptation of courtyard planning in contemporary buildings and the reinterpretation methodology discussed in the paper could be reused in other future buildings. This re-emergence of courtyard planning has became a trend in the current and future development in modern buildings. (This research paper is divided into 2 parts, analysis and discussion. Chapter 1, 2 and 3 in the first part are analysis on the original use of Chinese traditional courtyard house, contextual response on Three Courtyard Community Centre and modern design features adapted in the building. The
  4. 4. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 4 second part of this research paper includes discussion dedicated to how the building is influenced by the traditional courtyard in terms of similarity and differences. The impact of this building on local community is then discussed in the last chapter.)
  5. 5. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 5 INTRODUCTION China, one of the oldest civilization with histories that could date back as early as 3500 years ago. The timeline of its history is traditionally divided to periods of the reign of dynasties, which includes Shang, Zhou, Qin, Han, Ear of Division, Tang, Song, Yuan, Ming, Qing and lastly, the Chinese Republic in sequence. Prior to the survival needs of people, the ancient civilization began at the Grand Canal of China. It is located at the West of China, passing through the eight important states of China such BeiJing, JiangShu, SanDong, and others. It has also connected the five major water systems in the land, thus, is used as one of the main transportation for goods and for trading purposes since the olden days. Due to the use of Grand Canal, YangZhou city in JiangShu province, has grew to become one of the most prosperous city in China especially during the Tang, Song and Ming dynasties. It is rich of its own culture and practices, representing the major finance centre of China and Asia. Followed by the flourish of culture, significant traditional architecture of China has been conserved and preserved well in this city, for example, the Courtyard House, which could be seen in corners of YangZhou. The Courtyard house is a type of residential architecture. It consists of buildings that surround a courtyard on all sides due the strict hierarchy system of Chinese society and the climatic conditions in China. It’s form has been the archetype of architecture pattern for over a period in China and has been chosen as the ideal form to be improved throughout the generations as this suitable vernacular dwelling type can be adapted to the context, user needs and the socio-cultural of China. The Three Courtyard Community Centre, located in JiangShu, YangZhou, consists of three blocks of building, caters for the local society for several purposes. It nestled between an industry area and two old villages along Yangtze River, covering an area of
  6. 6. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 6 1900 sqm. The Community Centre was designed by Zhang Lei from AZL Architects, and was conceptualized from the Courtyard House which could be found around the site’s surrounding. He reinterpreted the traditional architecture in a contemporary style to integrate the building into site context
  7. 7. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 7 CHAPTER 1: AN OVERVIEW OF CHINESE TRADITIONAL COURTYARD HOUSE In China, the most typical traditional architecture used by the majority was the courtyard houses. Throughout Chinese history, courtyard was repeatedly used in many types of buildings such as palaces, temples, monastery, dwellings of royal family and government office building, in diverse architectural style depending on its location in China. Also known as quadrangles, with a courtyard surrounded by single-storey buildings is the basic unit of residential quadrangle. It is basically a residential compound enclosed by four walls whereas the numbers of courtyards in a house increases if its owned by a wealthier resident with higher status. 1.1 Spatial layout of Chinese Traditional Courtyard House Figure 1.1 – The typical courtyard house in Beijing. Source: Take Root.
  8. 8. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 8 One of the notable feature of Courtyard houses is that the building is fully enclosed by buildings and walls, with no windows on the outside walls leaving only small entrance to access the building. This has created a sharp distinction between inside and outside, forming a protected environment inside for privacy. Figure 1.2 : The basic layout of a three-courtyard house. Source : Pinterest, 2016. The most complete type of courtyard house is the three-courtyard house (三进四合院) with spaces followed by a hierarchy proceeding from the front to the back of the house. Buildings of courtyard houses are normally positioned along the north-south and east-west 1. 大门 / Main Entrance 2. 屏门 / Screen Door 3. 倒座房 / Reversed Room 4. 外院 / First Courtyard 5. 影壁 / Screen Wall 6. 二门 / Secondary Gate 7. 西厢房 / West Wing Room 8. 东厢房 / East Wing Room 9. 内院 / Second Courtyard 10. 甬道 / Walkway 11. 走廊 / Covered walkway 12. 正方 / Principal Room 13. 耳房 / Ear Room 14. 第三进院 / Third Courtyard 15. 后罩房 / Back Room
  9. 9. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 9 axis. It is then divided into two parts where the front is used for receiving guest and the rear part which located after the secondary gate is the main living area of the family. The main entrance has to face the southeast and is located at the south-eastern corner of the house instead of at the main central axis. A screen wall is placed behind the main entrance for privacy. To enter the main living area from the outer court, residents are welcomed with the secondary gate, also known as chui hua men (flower pendant gate). The principal rooms which comprise of a hall and rooms for parents and grandparents are the largest rooms among the others, and is placed at the main axis as this is where the memorial tablets of the ancestors were placed. On the side of the principal rooms are the ear rooms which is also known as family rooms. As for the wings rooms, the family of the eldest son would stay in the east whereas the family of younger sons would reside in the west wing rooms. Girls, daughters, maidservants are placed at the most secluded part of the house which is at the rear of the principal room. The reversed rooms on the southern end of the house comprise of few rooms, mostly rooms for servants and reception area. 1.2Factors affecting the spatial layout of Traditional Courtyard House The two main factors that affect the spatial layout of courtyard houses are the socio- cultural aspect and the climate of China. Family hierarchy plays an important role in the courtyard layout. The core quarter which is the most secluded part of the house is where the senior and head of the family resides, the inner quarter is for the younger generation, mainly sons’ family and the outer quarter is for the servants. Such positions of the rooms are highly influenced by Confucian order. Due to the influence of sun, principal room is placed at the northern part, facing south, allowing the space to receive most sunlight during winter so that the senior or head of the family could use it comfortably. The east and west sides which is for the children receives lesser sunlight whereas the south receives the least amount of sunlight.
  10. 10. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 10 The spaces are arranged based on the principles of balance and symmetry. Symmetry in Chinese represents harmony. Positive and negative spaces are formed along the axis without revealing the entire length of north south axis. A series of visibly blocked spaces are slowly revealed as user progresses in the building.
  11. 11. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 11 CHAPTER 2: CONTEXTUAL RESPONSE OF THE THREE COURTYARD COMMUNITY CENTRE The Three Courtyard Community Centre is specifically situated in Guangling, Yangzhou city, Jiangsu Province, China. Yangzhou is located at the edge of Yangtze River which is a stone thrown away from Nanjing. Guangling district is the main city of Jiangsu Province and it covers an area of 5.09 square kilometers. Throughout the years, Guangling district had been growing rapidly in different fields such as science and technology, urban and rural construction where the government decided to implement the transformation of village land as big as 7,900 acres. This has affected the selection of concept by Atelier Zhang Lei. He decided to use courtyard as the main concept for Three Courtyard Community Centre in order to preserve the cultural identity of traditional courtyard houses from the rapid urban development at Guangling. This is because courtyard design is one of the most fundamental housing planning in China. Other than that, the Three Community Courtyard Centre was built in between an urban area and rural area, which is the Jiangsu Information Service Industry Base and the traditional farmer village. In order to strike the balance between traditional and modern and to cater for the users from both areas, the application of local materials is one of the main design features. Materials such as terracotta bricks are extracted from the nearby river bed not to only create a sense of familiarity to the locals, but to also enhance the spatial experience through different arrangement in certain spaces.
  12. 12. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 12 Figure 2.1 – Location plan of Shilidian village. To mimic the Chinese small village, architect Zhang Lei uses a series of continuous pitch roof for the Three Courtyard Community Centre. According to the spatial layout, minimum roof overhang is used as spaces such as the main and secondary entrance to create a sense of welcome, encouraging visitors to enter the building rather than standing under the shade outside building. Also, this type of roof is inspired by Yingshan roof type to complement with contemporary architecture. Minimal ornaments were used for the roof to reflect the identity of low-profile luxury in the design. Figure 2.2 - “Ying-Shan” type roof. Source: Ziyeliu, 2012. Jiangsu Information Service Industry Base Three Courtyard Community Centre Chun Zhuang
  13. 13. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 13 Traditional courtyard houses are often built as one-storey buildings in China, due to the belief of local residents in the existence of ‘spirits’. The locals believed that ‘good spirits’ tend to flow near ground level, hence constructing multiple storeys would block the flow of positive energy in the house. Whereas in the application of Three Courtyard Community Centre, courtyard concept is used in order to prevent the building from standing out from the agricultural fields surrounding. Its low profile roofline ensure the visual continuity of the wide agricultural field next to it.
  14. 14. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 14 CHAPTER 3: THE ADAPTATION IN THREE COURTYARD COMMUNITY CENTRE Figure 3.1 - Floor plan of Three Courtyard Community Centre Source: Archdaily, 2011. Three Courtyard Community Centre is arranged in clustered form which clearly reflects the identity of local village. The clustered form consists of proximate squared units and they share a common visual relationship. Each block is implemented with its own conceptual themes, which consist of water, bamboo and stone. These three elements balances one another to create a placid, uneventful and sedentary space.
  15. 15. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 15 To access each building, one has to go through a double entrance, creating a layering effect to the visitors before they get into the building. The double entrance creates a sense of intimacy which prevents visitors from directly looking into the interior spaces in order to retain privacy. The concept of ‘courtyard within courtyard’ is used in Three Courtyard Community Centre. The orientation and arrangement of the three buildings formed a common public space in the center, which is used as parking space so that visitors can access the different buildings conveniently. Inside each building, there are internal courtyards in different locations, which include one main open-air courtyard and two supplementary courtyards. The central main courtyard is the focal point among all the spaces which is shield from the exterior whereas the remaining two courtyards can be viewed from outside. The main entrance is located off-axis from the building; however, dining spaces and courtyard on both sides formed acts as a navigator to direct visitors into other spaces. Visitors are slowly exposed to the three internal courtyards as they travel from one space to another through the lattice screening. After passing through the two smaller courtyards, one will arrive at the services area, which is where kitchen and washroom are located. The building offers various level of social interaction among community, neighborhood and family. Large public spaces are for the usage of companies’ or associations’ meeting or events, whereas small, intimate spaces are for dining purpose and are especially suitable for family gatherings. Such consideration for different spaces caters the needs of the local residents and office workers.
  16. 16. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 16 CHAPTER 4: COMPARISON BETWEEN SPATIAL PLANNING TRADITIONAL COURTYARD HOUSE AND THREE COURTYARD COMMUNITY CENTRE The most symbolic similarity between Three Courtyard Community Centre and Chinese Traditional Courtyard House is the clustered form. As a community center, Three Courtyard Community Centre has chosen to adapt the ‘courtyard within courtyard’ concept of Courtyard house where separation use of spaces are allowed for different groups of users at the same time without disturbance. Both architecture consist of three or four bay houses with a major courtyard formed in the center of the building. It is then multiplied to form smaller courtyards around a central courtyard for different purposes. The number of bay is always in odd number as it symbolizes fortune and luck. Whereas the number of courtyard form within a courtyard is in even number as courtyard represents Ying while houses represent Yang, potraying the Chinese traditional balance system. The function of courtyard varies according to its sizes and locations. Figure 4.2 - Three Bay house Source: Knapp. Figure 4.1 - A sketch of a Traditional Courtyard House. Source: Pinterest, 2013.
  17. 17. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 17 Figure 4.3 - Site plan of Three Courtyard Community Centre. Source: Archdaily, 2011. Prior to the function of Three Courtyard Community Centre, the spatial layout of a residential architecture has been modified to suit the public building. Originally, spatial organization of Courtyard houses are in symmetrical form to achieve the Chinese traditional balance system, in which Feng Shui plays a great impact on the house as well as the family or head of the clan. But in this community center, spatial organization is in asymmetrical form. This is to form multiple interesting pocket spaces that suit different individual preference; to create space of comfort, quiet and private as well as to represent Chinese society’s introvert and quiet characteristic. Besides that, the asymmetrical form could be a result of the influence of traditional Chinese gardens, which are often planned in asymmetrical layout to create the sense of natural landscape.
  18. 18. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 18 New element is added to the creation and development of Three Courtyard Community Centre to enhance the user experiences and the function of the spaces. Arrangements of bricks found in the community center are categorized into three types, the Herringbone, Lattice-like and interwoven. While the Herringbone pattern is seen to be used for the pathways, brick lattice acts as sun breaker while maintaining the natural ventilation and openness of the public spaces. Whereas in private spaces like family gathering rooms, kitchen and offices, interwoven brick pattern is used to maintain secrecy for private events. The combination use of both pattern mentioned above acts as a modern interpretation of Chinese traditional balance system of Yin and Yang, positive and negative. Figure 4.4 - Floor Plan of Three Courtyard Community Centre. Source: Archdaily, 2011. Figure 4.5 - An example of Traditional Courtyard House. Source: Inthuman.
  19. 19. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 19 Figure 4.8 - Lattice-like brick pattern. Source: Flickr, 2016. Figure 4.7 - Interwoven brick pattern. Source: One a Day Architecture, 2013. Figure 4.6 - Herringbone brick pattern. Source: Scofield.
  20. 20. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 20 CHAPTER 5: IMPACT ON THE LOCAL COMMUNITY OF YANG ZHOU CITY The Community Centre is built mainly to serve both the residents of the farmer’s village, employees in the new business park, as well as a minority group of tourists. Courtyard planning; a common ground between the village residence and the offices’ employees acts as the medium to connect these two distinct social groups. These users are attracted to the community centre as a sense of familiarity is created due to its application of vernacular spatial planning. Thus, community cohesion is encouraged during their social engagement. The concept of ‘courtyard within courtyard’ has created various level of social interaction, by allowing the community to meet formally and informally. It accommodates Industrial area with single-storey height (standard 6m height) Three Courtyard Community Centre with both and double-storey single height. Local Village with Traditional Chinese single-storey houses. (not more than 3m)
  21. 21. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 21 both public and private functions for the local community to use, by creating multiple interesting spaces suitable for different individual preferences; such as meeting rooms that allows business meeting to be carried out, as well as open courtyards and dining area that are able to house the public during normal days and festival seasons. Public Courtyard Main Courtyard (Gathering) Outer Courtyard (Welcoming) Private Courtyard The Traditional Chinese buildings were mostly made of wood or clay, which is a material that seemed more, like a continuance rather than a violation of the natural order. The architect has introduced contemporary design to the local residential area by incorporating Traditional Chinese building materials such as the striking color of red terracotta bricks, but with different masonry pattern. The use of three conceptual themes in the space planning for the building has strengthen the Chinese identity of this community centre within Yang Zhou City. It became Figure 5.1 – Nan Jiang Village. Source : Visitour, 2016. Figure 5.2 – The Three Courtyard Community Centre. Source : Visitour, 2016.
  22. 22. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 22 the best representation of contemporary architecture influenced by the traditional Chinese garden and villages in this region, right before the development of the modern industrial area on the west engulfs and overshadows the identity of the traditional vernacular housing beside the river.
  23. 23. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 23 CONCLUSION In order to pull a balance in the context between the ever developing modernity and historical past, the spatial layout of vernacular housing; courtyard house is reconstructed in Three Courtyard Community Centre as the architect’s attempt on the reinterpretation of traditional architecture in present time. The strict aesthetic requirement in designing traditional courtyard house is modified to suit the programming of the community centre which includes recreation, dining and meeting space. Solid and void in the building is relocated and reoriented as to create multiple public and private spaces as the building was intended to serve the local village and office’s employees in Yang Zhou city. Clustered spatial planning was incorporated with the courtyard planning to create variations in user’s experience. Courtyard house is not only an embedded identity of Chinese culture, it is also an environmental sustainable planning as the courtyard located in the centre building creates stack ventilation, while retaining user’s privacy. The versatility in courtyard planning allows it to be reinterpreted in endless way. Outcome obtained from this research paper shows that the spatial planning of courtyard house has became a common trend in present and future development of architecture. However, in present days, courtyard planning is commonly adapted only in low-rise building, there is a great potential for this concept to be applied in future high-rise building.
  24. 24. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 24 REFERENCES AZL architects: Three courtyards community center. (2013). Retrieved October 11, 2016, from http://www.designboom.com/architecture/azl-architects-three-courtyards-community-center -china/ Chinese Garden Illustration by Patrick Macdonald | 3D | CGSociety. (n.d.). Retrieved October 11, 2016, from http://reform.cgsociety.org/art/garden-3ds-vegetation-max-tree-trees-photoshop bush-chinese-vray-oriental-landscape-illustration-glasgow-scotland-uk-3d-409965 Courtyard Community Center, Yangzhou Building-e-architect. (2016). Retrieved October 11, 2016, from http://www.e-architect.co.uk/china/courtyard-community-center He Garden. (n.d.). Retrieved October 11, 2016, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/He_Garden Holland, J. (n.d.). Masonry in China. A Contrast of Ancient Art and Modern Technology. Retrieved September 27, 2016. Liu, J. (n.d.). 稻花香里说丰年——扬州三间院. Retrieved September 27, 2016, from http://www.gxcic.net/webeditnew/UploadNews/201411/20141107164450790.pdf Ltd., R. C. (n.d.). 扬州三间院. Retrieved October 11, 2016, from http://www.archcy.com/focus/brick building/1c79e0a8d25ddf3e New settlements in China. (2010). Milano: Ed. Lotus. Three Courtyard Community Centre / AZL architects. (2011). Retrieved October 11, 2016, from http://www.archdaily.com/132163/three-courtyard-community-centre-azl-architects The Icon 20/20 Architects: Zhang Lei - Icon Magazine. (n.d.). Retrieved October 11, 2016, from http://www.iconeye.com/architecture/features/item/10721-the-icon-20-20-architects-zhang- lei Trotman, A. (2011). Strengthening people and places: the role and value of community and
  25. 25. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 25 neighborhoods centres. Retreived Octorber 11, 2016 from http://www.communityindicatorsqld.org.au/sites/default/files/Role%20of%20community%20 centres.pdf Zhang, D.G. (2016). The New Architectural Trend in China: The Heritage and Development of Traditional Culture. Retrieved October 11,2016 from https://sc.lib.miamioh.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/2374.MIA/5988/Thesis.pdf?sequence=1&i sAllowed=y Zhang Lei: I am a Simple Man. (2010). Retrieved October 11, 2016, from http://movingcities.org/interviews/zhang-lei/ Zhang, Z.Q. (2015). Architecture for Housing: Multi-Function- Transitional Space of Housing in China. Retrieved October 11, 2016 from http://scholarworks.umass.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1320&context=masters_theses_ 2 关于扬州三间院的胡思乱想. (n.d.). Retrieved October 11, 2016, from https://www.douban.com/note/119301102/ 第二届中国建筑传媒奖. (n.d.). Retrieved October 11, 2016, from http://nd.oeeee.com/cama/2010/show/201011/t20101104_1156368.shtml 中国园林与宗教色彩. (n.d.). Retrieved October 11, 2016, from http://baike.baidu.com/view/14952643.htm
  26. 26. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 26 ARC 60403 / 2234 ASIAN ARCHITECTURE PROJECT 1 CASE STUDY PAPER FINAL PAPER MARKING SHEET (20%) Name : LEE YIH (0318340), LOH WEI SHUEN (0317896), LOVIE TEY YI QING (0318155), LOW EN HUEY (0317889), TAN JO LYNN (0318518), TIONG JIA MIN (0323763) Lecturer : MS. IDA CRITERIA 1 2 3 4 5 TOTA L Unsatisfactor y Developing Satisfactory Proficient Excellent (100 %) Content (40%) No evidence of thesis statement Has written a thesis statement (at least inferable), using appropriate language (although not necessarily with the best choice of words); may use passive voice verb(s) Has written a thesis statement (at least inferable), using appropriate language (although not necessarily with the best word choice); at least one active verb Has an understandabl e thesis statement, using some strong language, active verb(s), and appropriate descriptive words and / or phrases Has a clear thesis statement, using strong language, active verb(s), and appropriate descriptive words and / or phrases Consequences of the issue are absent Consequences of issue are vague or confusing At least one consequence s of the issue is presented Short and long term implications of this issue are presented Short and long terms implications of issue are clearly outlined and linked together Discussions and/or recommendati ons are absent or confusing Discussions and/or recommendati ons are absent or inappropriate One general discussion and/or recommendati on is presented One or two appropriate discussions and/or recommendati ons are presented Two or more thoughtful discussions and/or recommendati ons are convincingly presented Organizati on (20%) Arrangement of details and ideas is confusing Arrangement of details and ideas is unclear Details and ideas are roughly arranged in a workable order Details and ideas are well organized with a beginning, middle and end Details and ideas are carefully arranged to add interest and clarity Ideas are aimless and unconnected Writing is very disorganized and few ideas are connected Writing is sometimes off topic Ideas generally relate to the discussions and recommendati ons being presented Ideas and details build towards a convincing argument for the discussion and
  27. 27. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 27 recommendati ons Many run-ons, fragments and awkward phrasings making it hard to read the paper Sentences are often awkward and/or contain run-ons and fragments Sentences are generally well constructed but there may be one or two run-on, fragments or awkward sentences Sentences are complete and well- constructed. There are attempts at making the writing interesting Sentences are clear, complete and of varying lengths. Writing is interesting and convincing Writing Conventio ns (20%) Communicatio n is unclear due to many errors Communicatio n is occasionally interrupted by the errors made Communicati on is generally clear despite some errors There are a couple of spelling, punctuation and/or grammatical errors Correct spelling, punctuation and grammar No evidence of sources Uses at least 2 sources evenly in the paper Uses at least 3 sources evenly in the paper Uses at least 4 sources evenly in the paper Uses at least 5 sources evenly in the paper APA Citations (20%) Paper has more than 4 parenthetical errors Paper has no more than 4 parenthetical errors Paper has no more than 3 parenthetical errors Paper has no more than 2 parenthetical errors Paper has no more than 1 parenthetical error Paper has more than 8 cited page error according to APA guidelines Paper has no more than 8 cited page errors according to APA guidelines Paper has no more than 6 cited page errors according to APA guidelines Paper has no more than 4 cited page errors according to APA guidelines Paper has no more than 2 cited page errors according to APA guidelines Comments (if any):
  28. 28. [ARC 60403/2234] Asian Architecture 28

×