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Modelling the cement industry - Energy flows connected to material flows and production processes

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Modelling the cement industry - Energy flows connected to material flows and production processes
Mr. Michel Obrist, Paul Scherrer Institute

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Modelling the cement industry - Energy flows connected to material flows and production processes

  1. 1. WIR SCHAFFEN WISSEN – HEUTE FÜR MORGEN Modeling the cement industry - Energy flows connected to material flows and production processes Michel Dominik Obrist :: PhD Student :: Paul Scherrer Institute ETSAP-Workshop :: 17.12.2020
  2. 2. Presenter’s Profile Page 2 Michel Dominik Obrist Born 05.04.1989 PhD Student at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Villigen (CH) Laboratory for Energy System Analysis (LEA) Energy Economics Group Contact: michel.obrist@psi.ch +41 56 310 26 91 Education: Sep 09 – Sep 12: BSc in Mechanical Engineering University of Applied Sciences, Windisch (CH) Sep 16 – Sep 18: MSc in Sustainable Energy Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby (DK)
  3. 3. • TIMES based demand model of cement industry subsector • Scope: − Cement sector in Switzerland − Analysis until 2050 • Exogenous inputs: − Prices of the energy carrier from national energy system model (STEM) − Cement demand − Scenario analysis with energy efficiency target, CO2 tax and CO2 cap • Plan is to connect the subsector model to the national energy system model General description of the model Page 3
  4. 4. • Previous modelling technique Methodology – Modeling technique Page 4 Space heat Process heat Mechanical drives Lighting Others Model Electricity Coal Natural gas Oil Waste Biomass Hydrogen Wood pellets Energy carrier Energy service demand
  5. 5. • Previous modelling technique Methodology – Modeling technique Page 5 Space heat Process heat Mechanical drives Lighting Others Electricity Coal Natural gas Oil Waste Biomass Hydrogen Wood pellets Energy carrier Energy service demand
  6. 6. Methodology – Modeling technique Page 6
  7. 7. Methodology – Modeling technique Page 7
  8. 8. With the new modeling technique, the model can account for: • Specific energy efficiency improvements of single process steps − Mills with higher energy efficiency − Kilns with better insulation • Process related improvements − Waste heat recovery • Material efficiency enhancement − Clinker ratio in cement − Reuse of demolished concrete as supplementary cementitious material • Process related emissions − CO2 emissions from chemical conversion of limestone into clinker Advantages Page 8
  9. 9. Scope of the model Page 9
  10. 10. Burner Technologies Page 10
  11. 11. • Absorbtion with monoethanolamine (MEA) − CO2 is absorbed by aqueous menoethanolamine solvent − Requires considerable amount of heat for solvent regeneration • Chilled ammonia process − CO2 is adsorbed by chilled ammonia as solvent − Heat is required for solvent regeneration and ammonia recovery • Calcium Looping – Tail end − Based on the carbonation reaction CaO + CO2  CaCO3 − Implementation of steam cycle using waste heat is possible • Oxyfuel process − Combustion is performed with oxygen and CO2 − Process needs to be modified − Possibility to implement ORC because of the hot exhaust air CCS technologies Page 11
  12. 12. Result highlights - CCS technologies Page 12 [1] Obrist M. et al. (2020) • CAP-80 scenario targets a linear reduction of the CO2 emissions by 80% until 2050 compared to 2015
  13. 13. • CAP-80 scenario targets a linear reduction of the CO2 emissions by 80% until 2050 compared to 2015 Result highlights – Kiln technologies Page 13 [1] Obrist M. et al. (2020)
  14. 14. Results highlights – Energy consumption per production step (BAU) Page 14
  15. 15. • Detailed model of the Swiss cement sector with material flows and production processes connected to conventional energy flows • With the model we were able to show: − Energy consumption decreases (3.0 GJ/tcement in 2015 to 2.3 GJ/tcement in 2050) − CO2 emissions decrease (579 kgCO2/tcement in 2015 to 466 kgCO2/tcement in 2050) − Drastic reduction of the CO2 emissions requires CCS technologies and a minimum tax of 70 EUR/tCO2 Summary and conclusion Page 15 The full scenario analysis with all results is available in our publication: Obrist M., Kannan R., Schmidt T.J., Kober T. 2020. Decarbonization pathways of the Swiss cement industry towards net zero emissions. Journal of Cleaner Production, DOI: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2020.125413
  16. 16. Page 16 Wir schaffen Wissen – heute für morgen My thanks go to my supervisors • Dr. Tom Kober • Dr. Kannan Ramachandran • Prof. Dr. Thomas Schmidt Contact: michel.obrist@psi.ch +41 56 310 26 91

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