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Hydroponics - A Cultivation Technique Without Soil

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The founder of Hayley's Vintage Clothing and Jewelry, Hayley Ninnis has a longtime interest in sewing and making clothes. Hayley Ninnis also recently purchased a historic brick townhouse in Chester County, Pennsylvania, and is cultivating organic and hydroponic gardens there.

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Hydroponics - A Cultivation Technique Without Soil

  1. 1. HYDROPONICS - A CULTIVATION TECHNIQUE WITHOUT SOIL Hayley Ninnis
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION  The founder of Hayley's Vintage Clothing and Jewelry, Hayley Ninnis has a longtime interest in sewing and making clothes. Hayley Ninnis also recently purchased a historic brick townhouse in Chester County, Pennsylvania, and is cultivating organic and hydroponic gardens there. Unlike traditional gardening, hydroponics involves the use of a grow-bed container filled with chemically inert grow media that does not contain decaying organic matter. Popular types of media include sand, rockwool, and mica- based vermiculite. Peat moss, which does contain partially decayed organic material, is also acceptable, as it decays extremely slowly and retains water up to 10 times its weight.
  3. 3. HYDROPONICS  Below the grow media is the nutrient reservoir, which is positioned so as to accept the nutrient solution through gravity after plant feeding. Slightly acid and composed of a specially formulated hydroponic solution, the nutrient fluid is drawn through a wick system into the grow bed above. This relies on a combination of the wick material’s capillary properties and the absorbency of the grow media. While nutrient solutions are typically derived from chemicals, making organic hydroponics challenging, this is not hard and fast. In recent years, a Canadian government-funded group of Montreal rooftop gardeners has developed a soilless vegetable cultivation system that utilizes organic materials.

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