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7 top tips for creating the why

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7 top tips for creating the why

  1. 1. ….to engage your team 7 ways…..
  2. 2. Broadcast your ambition Tell everyone around you what you are trying to achieve. Make your sense of purpose infectious. Be a stuck record - tell it again and again. Be the CSB- Chief Story Broadcaster. Communicate early and clearly. If you want change to be dramatic and fast, don’t surprise your employees. You and all members of your change team will need to be able to get across to stakeholders the rationale and purpose of your change in a succinct, compelling way. Prepare a one minute ‘elevator pitch’ to get the message across. 1
  3. 3. Model the standards and behaviours you want the people around you to adopt. Be impatient with your mediocrity and don’t let yourself off the hook. If you find yourself slipping, stop, and get yourself back on track. Be the standard 2
  4. 4. M.A.D. Framework Message: Why am I speaking and what impact do I want to have? Delivery: What methods should I use to communicate this message effectively? Audience: Who am I communicating to? What are their current mindset and biases. What do I want them to think / feel / do? Consider these 3 elements when crafting your story: 3
  5. 5. Make brilliant noise What methods have you got in place to deliver a message? Email? Zoom? Meetings? Road shows?.... The list goes on. When delivering an important message, it is best to try and cover all preferences and communication channels. 4
  6. 6. Be like Goldilocks Two common mistakes people make when telling their story: they say too much, or they say too little. Ad sometimes they do both simultaneously. Follow the ‘Goldilocks’ theory of details. Give us “just the right amount”. If you give too many details we get lost, or worse, bored. Once you’ve written your story, start editing. Less is more. 5
  7. 7. Don’t try to sound like Harvard Business Review and hide behind business jargon. Imagine you’re reading your story to a friend who has nothing to do with the industry. Would they understand what you mean? Would they laugh at how stiff and pompous you sound? Be human Your story has to be as simple and direct as possible if it’s going to stick in people’s minds. Use short sentences and avoid clichés but the odd colloquialism (yep, honestly), down-to-earth metaphor (in the trenches, lip service) and emotive word (love, hate) is fine. 6
  8. 8. Excite You’re trying to influence people here, you should feel genuinely exited about your big ambition and the effect it’s gong to have. And that excitement should sing through your words, not by using lots of overblown adjectives but by laying out your vision in the simplest, boldest, most heartfelt way. Appeal to emotion. Studies show people make decisions largely based on emotional reasons and rationalise them afterwards so they feel logical. Paint pictures. This is great for taking a complex narrative and making it simple and sticky. Try using metaphors, alliteration or other literary magic to give your story colour. 7

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