O slideshow foi denunciado.
Utilizamos seu perfil e dados de atividades no LinkedIn para personalizar e exibir anúncios mais relevantes. Altere suas preferências de anúncios quando desejar.

Motherhood and Museum Professionals: Creating Environments Supportive of Work/Life Balance

In this interactive session, presenters used their (vastly) different experiences as new mothers at 5+ institutions to examine relevant issues. You can learn about new ideas such as “onboarding” new parents, and explore creative strategies to ensure museums have systems in place to achieve both what’s best for the museums and for their staff. This presentation focuses on parenthood, but conversations will apply more broadly to any work/life balance.

  • Entre para ver os comentários

  • Seja a primeira pessoa a gostar disto

Motherhood and Museum Professionals: Creating Environments Supportive of Work/Life Balance

  1. 1. Motherhood and Museum Professionals Creating Environments Supportive of Work/Life Balance Glenda Perry, Staffing Coordinator, SFMOMA | Lindsey Snyder, Museum Educator/PhD Student, UBC Teresa Valencia, Director of Curation and Education, Iolani Palace | Thea Block, Family Life Educator
  2. 2. Session Outline 1. Introductions 2. Status of Working Mothers 3. Issues for Museum Professionals as Mothers 4. Flexible Working Strategies 5. Inspiration from SFMOMA 6. Questions, Comments, and Discussion
  3. 3. Who’s in the audience?
  4. 4. What we’ll start a conversation about... ● Statistics about working mothers/the modern workplace ● How motherhood affects women’s careers ● Maternity leave policies ● Flexible work scheduling ● Community building for working mothers
  5. 5. …what we wish we had time for... ● More about how race is an additional factor in motherhood and careers… ○ Chat with Teresa about this! ● Specific laws in specific states… ○ Any California questions, talk to Glenda! ● Specific strategies for organizational change… ○ Ask Lindsey about Affirmative Inquiry! ● Family Life Education programs that can increase social health… ○ Talk to Thea for more! ● And so much more!
  6. 6. Meaning-making through Narratives (A.K.A. Why our “introductions” are going to take 20 minutes and why that’s valuable…) Stories are effective for learning. ➔ Engage us and stay with us ➔ Forge connections between listeners, between people, and between idea ➔ Contain multiple meanings, allowing for complex ideas ➔ Move beyond the abstract ➔ Work for auditory, visual, and kinesthetic (or “feeling”) learners ➔ Are remembered more accurately ➔ Make the topic/teller more approachable Harvard Business Publishing Corporate Learning, 2017 “What Makes Storytelling so Effective for Learning?”
  7. 7. What themes “stick” for you? Use the sticky notes to write short phrases about the issues that “stick” for you in these stories. One idea per sticky - use as many as you like - we’ll collect them later.
  8. 8. Lindsey Snyder Museum Educator PhD Student at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC Mother of Rosemary (5), Damien (4), Emery (18 months)
  9. 9. Emery’s First WMA Conference
  10. 10. Rosemary’s first day volunteering
  11. 11. My YouTube Channel of choice for pumping
  12. 12. Rosemary’s first AAM Conference
  13. 13. First day of school (PreK and PhD!)
  14. 14. Pumping in Class
  15. 15. Emery networking at WMA
  16. 16. Emery at a Museum Educator’s Meeting
  17. 17. THEMES/ISSUES FROM LINDSEY’S STORY: ➔ Staggered return to work ➔ Extension of 12 week leave ➔ Non-traditional work week (4x10) ➔ Space for pumping at work ➔ Pumping as “time away” from work ➔ Pumping as a task completed in a (semi) public space ➔ Museum career = less important career (moved for husband’s job, twice) ➔ Low pay for museum professionals ➔ High cost of child care ➔ Moving = Need for paid child care (versus family support) ➔ Personal/Professional choices for social/emotional health ➔ Lack of benefits for part time workers ➔ Extended job search time ➔ Lack of flexible working schedule ➔ Working from home as appropriate for tasks ➔ Bringing children to work ➔ Specialized knowledge (only one who could teach zoo class) ➔ Further schooling as way to continue career during “parenting break” ➔ Children at conferences/events
  18. 18. Teresa Valencia Director of Curation and Education Friends of the Iolani Palace, TOWN NAME, Hawaii Mother of Aiden (2.5)
  19. 19. Iolani Palace Employee Handbook Hawaii Pregnancy Leave Female employees unable to perform the duties of her position due to pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions for a reasonable period of time as determined by the employee’s physician will be granted unpaid leave. Prior to onset of the unpaid leave, the employee must submit a physician’s certificate stating estimated commencement and termination dates of the leave. Prior to returning from her leave, the employee must submit a physician’s certificate approving her return to work. Upon timely return to work, the employee will be reinstated to her original job, or to a position of comparable status and pay, without loss of seniority and privileges. During such leave, employees may qualify for temporary disability benefits or sick leave benefits to the same extent as any other employee. The Friends of Iolani Palace does not qualify for Family Medical Leave Act.
  20. 20. Maternity Leave Temporary Disability…. 55% of pay No family leave. My husband did not have the opportunity to take time off without needing to use vacation hours. He returned to work the day after our son was born.
  21. 21. The best laid plans…. What was going to happen now?
  22. 22. Flexible working schedule I was in constant communication with my fellow staff about my schedule.
  23. 23. “I’m borrowing the office… please come back later.” Returning to Work
  24. 24. Hawaiʻi Museums Association - Museum Mamas Hui Social meetups and a Facebook page for sharing resources with each other
  25. 25. Aiden (now 2 ½ years old) attends an Early Learning Center 5 days a week while I work Monday-Friday. And he loves it! No (well, maybe a little) mom guilt over this decision.
  26. 26. THEMES/ISSUES FROM TERESA’S STORY: ➔ Pregnancy alongside other life changes (finishing school, moving, etc.) ➔ Establishing “on/off” times ➔ Small organizations not eligible for FMLA ➔ Both parents working at same organization ➔ Shared office space for pumping ➔ Unclear policy ➔ Lack of policy ➔ Special permission from supervisor ➔ Involving museum board in decision-making regarding flexible scheduling, etc. ➔ Lack of institution-wide change - just a “one time” sign off ➔ Using temporary disability in lieu of FMLA ➔ Bringing children to work ➔ Higher insurance costs for children at workplace ➔ Maternal guilt over childcare ➔ Using shared motherhood experiences for community building across organizations ➔ Mama’s Hui (community group) ➔ Use of social media to connect mothers ➔ Need for in-person connections
  27. 27. Glenda Perry Staffing Coordinator San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, California Mother of Nico(2.5)
  28. 28. THEMES/ISSUES FROM GLENDA’S STORY: ➔ Delaying pregnancy for financial reasons ➔ Coordinating working/childcare schedules with spouse/co-parent ➔ Need for flexibility to accommodate for spouse/co- parent’s schedule ➔ Other big things in life can happen at the same time as pregnancy/having a baby (husband’s broken leg) ➔ System requiring “make up” for “trades” in schedule ➔ Health issues during early pregnancy ➔ Access to reliable/safe transportation during pregnancy ➔ Physical and mental strain of pregnancy ➔ Open communication with supervisor ➔ Communication with supervisor during leave ➔ Determining what aspects of a job are truly necessary to do on-site and what can be done remotely ➔ Working with managers to prepare them to help staff during a leave of absence ➔ Viewing a return to work after a leave of absence as a time for “onboarding” (similar to a new hire’s gradual increase in responsibility) ➔ Creating a community of mothers/new parents within the museum for support
  29. 29. Thea Block Family Life Educator Self-Employed, based in Portland, Oregon Mother of Linus (4 months)
  30. 30. ● Masters in Family Studies (MAFS) from Fuller Theological Seminary’s School of Psychology ● Certified Family Life Educator (CFLE) from the National Council for Family Relations (NCFR)
  31. 31. ● Lived in New York City, Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA ● Currently live in Portland, OR
  32. 32. Wife to Jeff (Lindsey’s brother!) - married 7 years
  33. 33. Mom to Linus (age 4 months!)
  34. 34. Museums were a large part of my education during my early years as a homeschooler who traveled often with my family. I learned history, art appreciation, geography, science, politics, languages, botany, zoology, sociology, anthropology from the museums I visited. This formed in me a deep appreciation for what museums are capable of in the lives of children and adults.
  35. 35. -Met my husband -Many dates at zoos and museums around Chicago
  36. 36. -Introduced to Lindsey, and began to work as a contractor at the Field as an educator for “Dozin’ with the Dinos” overnights and BoyScout Badge Days.
  37. 37. National Council for Family Relations Conference 7 weeks pregnant! Motherhood and Work-Life Balance
  38. 38. Working at home while on bedrest
  39. 39. 36 weeks! (5 days before Linus was born)
  40. 40. Complications with early baby Modified/Flexible schedules FMLA - guaranteed not lose your job and take 12 weeks off, no payment Paternity Leave -5 weeks (3 weeks PTO, 2 weeks unpaid)
  41. 41. Why care about work-life balance?
  42. 42. THEMES/ISSUES FROM THEA'S STORY: ➔ Part time “contractor” work for museum jobs ➔ No benefits for “self-employed contractors” ➔ Bedrest during pregnancy ➔ Working from home during pregnancy ➔ Pre-term baby ➔ Nursing complications ➔ Need for two parents on leave at same time ➔ Inability to have a lengthy leave for both parents because it would be unpaid/use up all sick/vacation time Pass sticky notes with ideas to end of aisle and up to presenters. Keep sticky notes handy and write down any additional questions or topics to bring up during the Questions, Comments, Discussion portion.
  43. 43. Status of Working Moms Creating Environments Supportive of Work/Life Balance
  44. 44. 71.5% of women with children under the age of 18 are employed (or are looking for work) This number is rising each year. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2018
  45. 45. 78% of employed mothers work full-time Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2018
  46. 46. 14% of American workers have access to employer-sponsored paid family leave US Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2016
  47. 47. The US is the only developed nation with no paid leave The US is the only member of the 36 countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) with no national policy mandating paid maternity leave for workers.
  48. 48. Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) guarantees 12 weeks of unpaid leave *Guarantees that employees who have worked full-time for one year at companies with 50+ employees are granted up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave with job protection and continuation of medical benefits to care for a baby or an ill family member.
  49. 49. 9 States offer paid Family/Med Leave California, Connecticut, DC, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Washington have laws requiring paid leave for family or medical issues in effect or in process.
  50. 50. Our workplace policies were meant for a different time: ● Many policies and structures are outdated, reflecting a different economy and gender-based spheres of work. ● Our societal norms and later age of childbearing means women are having babies and careers at the same time. ● Dual-earner families are often a necessity. ● The high costs of childcare and lack of multigenerational family support leaves parents with few options and little flexibility for care. ● Our globalized world means internet is universally accessible so work-from-home options are more feasible.
  51. 51. 48% of (heterosexual) married-couple families had both husband and wife employed (dual-earner couples) Research, demographics, and cultural trends suggest this will continue to be the dominant American family form. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2015; Handbook of Work-Family Integration, 2008
  52. 52. Paid leave pays. -significantly reduces attrition rates -attracts better talent -improves morale and productivity -attracts consumers and improves the brand -improves health outcomes of mother and child -reduces stress and rates of depression for new mothers -keeps working mothers engaged in the workforce Boston Consulting Group, 2017
  53. 53. 50% fewer mothers employed at Google quit after maternity leave when paid leave was expanded from 12 weeks to 18 weeks Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2018
  54. 54. 83% of women consider it be extremely important that they work for an employer who both understands and respects their work- life integration priorities The Return-to-Work Report
  55. 55. Mothers who reduce their work commitments for children damage their occupational attainment Even if they resume a more career-oriented focus later, they have often damaged their long-term occupational attainment and have reproduced gender stratification. What can institutions and companies do to keep women in the workforce while raising children? Becker & Moen, 1999
  56. 56. $15,000 The average cost of full-time center-based care per year. Only 10% of early childhood providers across the U.S. are considered high-quality. Center for American Progress
  57. 57. Benefits to family friendly policies for companies -Retain valuable employees -Avoid direct and indirect costs of turnover: ● it costs 20% of employee’s salary to replace her ● consistency of corporate knowledge ● productivity losses Center for American Progress, 2012
  58. 58. 92% of surveyed companies with paid family leave policies reported a positive effect or no effect on profitability Many manage the costs of paid leave through thoughtful design to fit their business’ context. Boston Consulting Group, 2017
  59. 59. Why museum professionals leave the field: 1. Pay too low 2. Other 3. Work-Life balance 4. Insufficient benefits 5. Workload / better positions (tie) 6. Schedule didn’t work Write-in answers included no FMLA, no maternity leave, had a child and couldn’t afford childcare, and expectations that exceeded work-life balance. Informal survey through American Alliance of Museums, 2017 (1,000 respondents)
  60. 60. Reasons moms decide to keep working or quit: 1. “A family-friendly schedule” 2. Desire to be home with kids as much as possible 3. High cost of childcare makes paid work not worthwhile Informal survey through The Mom Project, 2018
  61. 61. What are creative policies for museums that both give working mothers flexibility and profit their institutions?
  62. 62. How family-aware policies help mothers: -Ability to schedule around doctors appts, sick days, school/day-care drop-off and pick-up times, and attend important children’s events -Ability to arrange for alternative childcare options (spouse, family member, less time and money overall) -Ability to job-share (two employees sharing FT job), attend to medical issues or attachment issues through staggered back-to-work, or
  63. 63. Effective Family Leave Policy -Reflects the company’s values. -Considers that amount of time provided to the employee is not the only value. Flexibility counts! -Sets the example at the top. There must be acceptance and use of the policy throughout the company for it to make a difference. -Develops support systems for employee transitions, i.e. HR communications, checklists for transitions for managers. -Choose metrics to measure success. Boston Consulting Group, 2017
  64. 64. Motherhood in Museums & the Workplace Female Leadership & the Motherhood Penalty
  65. 65. Museums as a Pink Collar Profession
  66. 66. 2018 Mellon Report
  67. 67. 2018 Mellon Report: Gender Statistics
  68. 68. 2018 Mellon Report: Intellectual Leadership Positions
  69. 69. 2018 Mellon Report: Race/Ethnicity Statistics
  70. 70. Equality vs. Equity
  71. 71. Female Leadership in Museums
  72. 72. Motherhood Penalty and the Fatherhood Bonus
  73. 73. The Motherhood Penalty
  74. 74. Maternal Wall
  75. 75. Career Tree
  76. 76. Parenthood + Leadership
  77. 77. What can you do?
  78. 78. Time at work, time at home Negotiating healthy work/home boundaries and confronting a culture of “presentee-ism” (being present at work for the sake of it)
  79. 79. “Waiting” 2017 by Emma https://english.emmaclit.com
  80. 80. “Waiting” 2017 by Emma https://english.emmaclit.com
  81. 81. “Waiting” 2017 by Emma https://english.emmaclit.com
  82. 82. “Waiting” 2017 by Emma https://english.emmaclit.com
  83. 83. Flexible Working Employee controls when and/or where they work Schedule control: ➔ Change timing of work ➔ Fluctuate hours worked each week ➔ Accumulate hours for days off ➔ Hours calculated throughout year rather than weekly ➔ Compressed hours (e.g. 4 days x 10 hours) ➔ Job sharing Telecommuting (Work Offsite)
  84. 84. Flexible working = mothers keep working Women who had the ability to work from home when needed and those who used a flexible schedule were MUCH LESS LIKELY to significantly reduce their working hours after childbirth Women’s employment patterns after childbirth and the perceived access to and use of flextime and teleworking. Human Relations. (2017)
  85. 85. Others using flexible working reduces stigma Women who used a flexible schedule prior to childbirth were more likely to use this after having children - may be company-wide reduced fear of the “flexibility stigma” Women’s employment patterns after childbirth and the perceived access to and use of flextime and teleworking. Human Relations. (2017)
  86. 86. Use is more important than perceived access Perceived access to flexible working is not sufficient to support mothers in returning after childbirth, work/home benefits are only seen in the use of flexible working. Women’s employment patterns after childbirth and the perceived access to and use of flextime and teleworking. Human Relations. (2017)
  87. 87. More flex = more work?! ● Work/home boundary blurs ● Multi-tasking ● Work intensity and home intensity BOTH INCREASE
  88. 88. Decrease in performance reducing issues Flexible working can lead to a decrease of performance reducing issues such as sickness or other issues that would take time/focus away from work. Flexible working and unpaid overtime in the UK: The role of gender, parental and occupational status. Social Indicators Research. (2018).
  89. 89. Increase in productive working hours Flexible working allows employees to work during a their most productive hours, leading to increased quality of work in the same number of hours. Flexible working and unpaid overtime in the UK: The role of gender, parental and occupational status. Social Indicators Research. (2018).
  90. 90. Vocation rather than employment Certain types of work may be considered “a calling” more than “a job” and lead to increased working hours. ‘If you put pressure on yourself to produce then that’s your responsibility’: Mothers’ experiences of maternity leave and flexible work in the neoliberal university. Gender Work Organizations. (2019)
  91. 91. “Autonomy paradox” = spiraling into 24/7 work “Autonomy paradox” can occur when an employee has control of their working hours/works from home. This is a “collective spiral of escalating engagement, where they end up working everywhere/all the time.” Flexible working and unpaid overtime in the UK: The role of gender, parental and occupational status. Social Indicators Research. (2018).
  92. 92. “Gift exchange theory” = working more to say thanks “Gift exchange theory” posits that employees feel they must reciprocate for the “gift” of a flexible work schedule, and thus work more hours as a way to “pay back” their employer. Flexible working and unpaid overtime in the UK: The role of gender, parental and occupational status. Social Indicators Research. (2018).
  93. 93. Off-site work can mean “back door” overtime Employers can take advantage of the lack of a time clock/physical presence to require employees work more hours. Flexible working and unpaid overtime in the UK: The role of gender, parental and occupational status. Social Indicators Research. (2018).
  94. 94. Production-based vs. family friendly Work intensification leading to increased unpaid overtime found to be related to production-based flexible schedules NOT family friendly flexible schedules* Flexible working and unpaid overtime in the UK: The role of gender, parental and occupational status. Social Indicators Research. (2018).
  95. 95. No evidence of flexible workers working less No evidence of family friendly scheduling leading to less work hours, and work may in fact be of greater qualitative intensity in the same number of hours. Gender, flexibility stigma, and the perceived negative consequences of flexible working in the UK. Social Indicators Research. (2018)
  96. 96. Flexible working may increase loyalty Employees using family-friendly flexible working may be more committed to their work and less likely to leave their workplace, which provides benefits to the company over time. Doing more with less? Flexible working practices and the intensification of work. Human Relations. (2010) Flexible working and performance: A systematic review of the evidence for a business case. International Journal of Management Reviews. (2011)
  97. 97. Boundary Theory How do people negotiate the work/home interface? Do you seek work/home integration or work/home segregation? People create symbolic boundaries by classifying activities, events, places, and people in categories to simplify the world in which they live.
  98. 98. Using various boundaries to reduce work/home conflict
  99. 99. Use technology to filter Take advantage of technology to increase your ability to filter tasks. Technology-assisted supplemental work and work-to-family conflict: the role of instrumentality beliefs, organizational expectations and time management. Human Relations (2010)
  100. 100. Use technology to keep in touch Consider how family members can/should contact you during working hours and vice versa with employees/supervisors. Technology-assisted supplemental work and work-to-family conflict: the role of instrumentality beliefs, organizational expectations and time management. Human Relations (2010)
  101. 101. Use technology to integrate or segregate Thoughtfully consider whether to integrate your personal and work phone, email account, etc. Technology-assisted supplemental work and work-to-family conflict: the role of instrumentality beliefs, organizational expectations and time management. Human Relations (2010)
  102. 102. Put time in two different “bank accounts” Debit or credit “time” into your work “bank account” or home “bank account” - know that “spending patterns” will be different in each. How do working mothers negotiate the work-home interface? Journal of Managerial Psychology. (2015)
  103. 103. Synchronize tasks Consider what tasks can be accomplished simultaneously to maximize time. How do working mothers negotiate the work-home interface? Journal of Managerial Psychology. (2015)
  104. 104. Establish “on/off” times Determine with your family and your company what hours are dedicated to work/home. Provide as much consistency as you are able.
  105. 105. Find respite Temporarily isolate yourself from both work and home demands. How do working mothers negotiate the work-home interface? Journal of Managerial Psychology. (2015)
  106. 106. Close a “door” on your work environment For flexible working from home, use symbolic physical objects to establish a clear distinction between work/home. How do working mothers negotiate the work-home interface? Journal of Managerial Psychology. (2015)
  107. 107. Use objects as physical reminders of work/home Place objects from home (e.g. child artwork) in your work environment as a physical reminder of your priorities. Use changes of clothing as a physical reminder of your “work” time or “home” time. How do working mothers negotiate the work-home interface? Journal of Managerial Psychology. (2015)
  108. 108. Use other people as “border keepers” Recruit staff or family members to assist you in filtering “distractions,” triaging tasks, or preserving established borders. How do working mothers negotiate the work-home interface? Journal of Managerial Psychology. (2015)
  109. 109. Decide if any boundaries are “permeable” For instance, on what topics should a family member/staff member connect with you immediately rather than respecting “on/off” times. Balancing borders and bridges negotiating the work-home interface via boundary work tactics
  110. 110. Communicate! As incongruence between worker/family or worker/company increases work/home conflict increases. Set expectations. Then re-negotiate those expectations. How do working mothers negotiate the work-home interface? Journal of Managerial Psychology. (2015)
  111. 111. Confront boundary violators Call out others (or yourself!) when boundaries have been crossed. Determine how to avoid this in the future. How do working mothers negotiate the work-home interface? Journal of Managerial Psychology. (2015)
  112. 112. Nuts and Bolts and New Ideas Basic information about leave and new ideas for supporting working parents
  113. 113. Leave of Absence (LOA) ➔ Understand the labor laws for LOA in your state ➔ Ask your HR department about LOA policies ➔ Understand the difference between amount of time off and amount of paid time off ➔ Can you integrate vacation and sick time with your state disability insurance (SDI) payment
  114. 114. Leave of Absence Checklists For staff member going on leave: ➔ Build a calendar that explains time off vs. paid time off ➔ Have a checklist before you start leave ➔ Have a checklist for when you are on leave ➔ Have a checklist for returning to work For the manager: ➔ Have a checklist for supporting the person going on leave ➔ Have a checklist for supporting the person when returning from leave
  115. 115. Leave of Absence Glossary (includes some specific to California) CFRA – California Family Rights Act EDD - Employment Development Department FMLA – Family Medical Leave Act LOA – Leave of Absence PDL – Pregnancy Disability Leave PFL – Paid Family Leave PPL – Paid Parental Leave SDI – State Disability
  116. 116. Training managers to support people on leave How can supervisors (or other staff) support people going on leave? What would this look like at your institution?
  117. 117. “Onboarding” parents returning to work Should someone returning from a 3 month leave (that includes all the stress/lack of sleep/etc of a new baby!) be expected to jump in full steam back to work? What might “onboarding” for a parent look like at your institution?
  118. 118. Creating a parent group for support Creating a support group of parents within the workplace/across workplaces is one way to continue to support employees as parents. What are other ways your institution might support parents and those seeking greater work/life balance?
  119. 119. Questions, Comments, Discussion Email LSnyder1222@gmail.com for a link to a Google Site (includes powerpoint + more)

×