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Sexual and-gender-identity-lesson-ppt

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Sexual and-gender-identity-lesson-ppt

  1. 1. exual agender aromantic bisexual gender- utral pansexual genderqueer transgender erosexual LGBTQIA homoromantic lesbian n-binary questioning genderfluid demisexu exual agender aromantic bisexual gender- utral pansexual genderqueer transgender erosexual LGBTQIA homoromantic lesbian n-binary questioning genderfluid demisexu BTQIA homoromantic lesbian non-binary estioning genderfluid demisexual asexual ender aromantic bisexual gender-neutral nsexual genderqueer transgender genderflu misexual LGBTQIA homoromantic lesbian n
  2. 2. Introduction • LOs:  To recognize a range of terms relating to identity.  To understand their context and how to use them without being offensive.  To appreciate the problems some people face because of their identity. • Be respectful during this presentation. We will discuss some sensitive and personal issues. • There are a lot of words because are trying to categories everyone. • Using any these words is a personal choice. • Definitions may vary from person to person. • Respect other people’s identities.
  3. 3. Queer Pansexual Bisexual Straight Gay/Lesbian Asexual Sexual Orientation How much do you know about sexuality? Lack of sexual attraction Attraction to a gender different from your own Attraction to two or more genders Attraction to all genders Umbrella or stand alone term reclaimed by some LGBTQ people. Only these people can use it as to many it is offensive. Attraction to your own gender
  4. 4. Romantic v Sexual Orientation • Some people do not feel sexual attraction and so they often distinguish between sexual and romantic attraction. • Generally a romantic attraction is the desire to be in some sort of non-sexual relationship with a person. • Romantic labels use the same prefixes as sexual ones, e.g aromantic, homo-romantic. • Romantic and sexual identities do not have to match.
  5. 5. Umbrella terms Grey-asexual Little sexual attreaction/rare occurence Demisexual Sexual attraction only once a strong emotional bond is formed Polysexual Attraction to many (but not all) genders Homo/ Heteroflexible Usually attracted to one gender but occasionally not Both asexual and bisexual are identities in their own right, they are also umbrella terms. This means they cover a range of different identities too, including:
  6. 6. Gender • Gender and sex are different things. Sex refers to anatomy while gender is a social category and refers to behavior and feelings. • Your gender identity is your own perception of your gender and what label you choose to use. Gender expression is how you convey this, e.g. through clothing. • Sometimes your gender and sex don’t match up. • Male and female are common genders and together they are called the gender binary.
  7. 7. Gender terms Genderqueer Gender neutral Agender Non-binary Gender fluid Transgender Cisgender Gender Gender identity changes or fluctuates Gender outside the male/female binary Identities not easily categorized as masculine or feminine. Often a blend of the two. Gender identity, gender expression and sex match up Do not identify with a gender Umbrella term to describe non- normative genders like agender/gender fluid etc Umbrella term-where sex, gender expression and gender identity do not match up
  8. 8. Pronouns • As someone’s gender identity might not be immediate obvious, you might use the wrong pronouns when addressing them. • If you are unsure you can ask politely, what pronouns they prefer. Always respect their answer. • They, Ze and Hir are common gender neutral pronouns but if someone prefers something different you should use the pronoun they tell you. • Examples: That is hirs. They are over there.
  9. 9. Terms to Avoid • transgendered – instead transgender should be used as an adjective e.g. he is a transgender man. • Biologically male/female – These terms over-simplify a complex subject of what makes up someone’s sex. ‘Assigned male/female at birth’ (AMAB/AFAB) is preferred. • Tranny, she-male, it – these words dehumanise transgender people and are offensive.
  10. 10. Agender Pride Flag Match-Up 6. White and black indicate absence of gender. Grey = semi-genderless Green represents non-binary genders as it is the inverse of the binary associated colour, purple. (blue for male + red for female = purple) Pride flags are common symbols used to identify a particular group in the LGBTQ community. They can also give people an important sense of identity and community. On your worksheet try and match up the flag to the label. Think about the significance of the colours to help you. Aromantic 3. This is one of the proposed aromantic flags. Green is used as it is the opposite red, a colour traditionally representing love/romance. Grey represents grey-aromantic people who are between romantic and aromantic. Black indicates the absence of romantic attraction.
  11. 11. Asexual 7. The black stripe represents the absence of sexual attraction Grey represents grey-asexuality, demisexuality and people on the asexual spectrum White is for non-asexual partners and allies The purple stands for community Bisexual 8. Pink represents attraction to the same gender Blue represents attraction to a different gender Purple represents the overlap, where bisexual people are attracted to both Gay/ LGBTQ 1. This is the six striped version of the pride flag. There are also less commonly used 7 and 8 striped ones. Originally each colour has its own meaning (life, healing, sunlight, nature, serenity and spirit) but now the rainbow is said to reflect the diversity of the LGBTQ community.
  12. 12. Gender- queer 5. Here, purple represents androgyny and people who define as a mix of male and female. It is a mix of blue and pink which are traditionally associated with male and female White represents agender people Green is the opposite colour to purple and so stands for people who define outside of or without reference to the gender binary. Non- binary 2. Yellow – no reference to the binary as yellow is its own primary colour. White - those who have many genders as it is all the colours of the light spectrum mixed Purple represents those who are a mix of male and female Black represents the absence of gender as it is the absence of light.
  13. 13. Transgender 9. The blue stripes represent male and the pink, female. The white in the middle represents those who are transitioning or those who have a neutral gender, no gender, or intersex people. According to the creator, Monica Helms, “the pattern is such that no matter which way you fly it, it is always correct, signifying us finding correctness in our lives.” Pansexual 4. Used to distinguish between the pansexual and bisexual community. Pink represents those who identify as female Blue represents those who identify as male The yellow stripe is how it differentiated from the bisexual pride flag. Yellow represents non-binary people as it a primary colour and not a mix of anything else.
  14. 14. Stigmas and Discrimination • Now we know the basics of what these words mean, we can think about what defining yourself as LGBTQ+ means in practical terms. • In groups, brainstorm some ideas about what might affect different LGBTQ+ people.
  15. 15. • Some people think asexual people are broken or weird. • Bisexual people get stigmatized as greedy or liars and are extensively under-represented in the media. • Gay is still used as a derogatory term. • Transgender and non-binary people live in a strictly male/female world, e.g. the issue of male/female toilets or job applications which ask for your gender but only have two options. • Sometimes these people are refused access to benefits reserved for people of their gender identity but not their assigned sex. • People with identities that are not widely represented in the media are often told they don’t exist or they are simply using a label for attention. • These issues can lead to very serious consequences. It is now widely documented that LGBTQ+ people have a higher prevalence of mental health problems, as well as being more likely to self harm or attempt suicide. Stigmas and Discrimination - Examples
  16. 16. Discrimination leads to: • A quarter of the UK’s homeless youth are LGBT. About 70% of these were forced out by their families.1 • 96% of gay pupils hear homophobic language in school.2 • Bisexual people are around six times more likely to report having been suicidal than heterosexual people.3 • A survey by PACE (LGBT mental health charity) concluded that 48% of trans people under 26 had attempted suicide, compared with 6% of all 16-24 year olds.4
  17. 17. What we can do • Learn: be a good ally and listen to LGBTQ+ people when they say something is wrong. Learn from your mistakes. • Respect: don’t judge someone, whatever label they use. Don’t use offensive language, even if you think it’s a joke. • Educate: talk to parents, teachers and friends. If someone says something offensive, call them out!

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