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Development of a Business Model for the Implementation of a Sustainable Point of Use Water Filter Program in the Dominican Republic

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Development of a Business Model for the Implementation of a Sustainable Point of Use Water Filter Program in the Dominican Republic

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The lack of clean water remains a critical public health challenge throughout the developing world, and developing viable, sustainable programs is part of this challenge. This presentation describes a business model that was developed in partnership with a Dominican Republic NGO through a NCIIA Sustainable Vision grant. The program incorporates elements of health promotion, social marketing, microfinance and local entrepreneurship to help the rural poor purchase point-of-use water filters. The presenters will share their experiences and lessons learned.

The lack of clean water remains a critical public health challenge throughout the developing world, and developing viable, sustainable programs is part of this challenge. This presentation describes a business model that was developed in partnership with a Dominican Republic NGO through a NCIIA Sustainable Vision grant. The program incorporates elements of health promotion, social marketing, microfinance and local entrepreneurship to help the rural poor purchase point-of-use water filters. The presenters will share their experiences and lessons learned.

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Development of a Business Model for the Implementation of a Sustainable Point of Use Water Filter Program in the Dominican Republic

  1. 1. Chris  King  &  Jason  Kennedy   Saint  Louis  University  
  2. 2. Project  Goals     Develop  a  Sustainable  Entrepreneurial  Model  for  the   Sale  of  POU  Filters     Develop  the  Capacity  of  an  NGO,  ILAC,  to  implement   this  model       Improve  quality  of  life  in  the  rural  DR  by  increasing   economic  opportunity  and  reduce  disease    
  3. 3. Ins/tute  for  La/n  American   Concerns,  San/ago,  DR   40  years  of  service  to   North  Central  DR   Provide  a  variety  of   Services     Health  Education     Medical     Agricultural  Extension     Microfinance     Drinking  Water  
  4. 4. Cooperadoras     Key  to  ILAC’s  Success     Elected  by  community     Volunteer  Position     Certified  after  one  year     Continued  Education  
  5. 5. Established  Program  
  6. 6. NCIIA  Sustainable  Vision  Grant     Hire  a  full  time   coordinator     Establish  a  Supply  Chain     Establish  network  of   entrepreneurs     Finance  cost  1  year  (US   $33)     Funds  Revolve    
  7. 7. Cost  Structure   Item   Cost   Percent   Components   $18.00   0.55   Salary   $7.25   0.23   Incentive   $1.50   0.05   Bad  Debt   $2.75   0.08   Administrative   $3.50   0.11                    Totals   $33.00   1.00   Cost Recovery at Sale of 440 Units
  8. 8. Lessons Learned
  9. 9. Only  a  business  model  that  is  culturally  submerged   can  achieve  scalable  and  sustainable  success.  
  10. 10. Thanks  to  our  Program  Partners  and  Par/cipants   Creighton  University  ILAC   Center   Participants:    Dr.  Gary  Michels,  CU    Dr.  Roger  Lewis,  SLU    Dana  Hage,  MPH   Our  thanks  to  NCIIA  for   their  generous  support  this   program  
  11. 11. Presenta/on  Overview     Introduction     OUR  GOAL:  TELL  YOU  OUR  STORY;  STORY  IS  ABOUT  PEOPLE  WE  WORK  WITH;  THINK  OF  OUR   PRESENTATION  AS  THE  PICTURE  BOOK  TO  HELP  INTRODUCE  YOU  TO  OUR  PARTNERS  (NOT  T YPICAL   POWERPOINT  PRESENTATION)     Background/History  of  Program     Pre-­‐NCIIA  Program,  ILAC,  Mission  of  ILAC,  etc.  (Larger  picture  &  how  project  fits  in;  3-­‐4  minutes)     NCIIA  grant  starting  2  years  ago  (4-­‐5  minutes)     Goals  of  NCIIA  grant;  Project  design     Story  of  what  has  happened  with  NCIIA  project  (successes  &  failures)     Based  on  existing  program  &  network     Explanation  of  what  went  well,  what  problems  we  hit,  where  project  is  now     End  Points;  Evaluation  (Important  Point;  tough  for  a  project  like  ours,  but  do-­‐able),  Future  of  Project     Transition  to  discuss  how  we  made  some  key  choices     Our  Key  Choices  (4-­‐5  minutes)     Easy  Choice:  Technology  (Filter)     Maybe  easiest/least  important  decision     Think  practical  &  about  consumer     First  Instinct:  My  Design  Considerations     High  Removal  %,  High  Flow  Rate,  High  Storage  Capacity     Alternative:  Think  practical;  think  local;  talk  to  people     Doesn’t  break,  easy  to  transport,  low  cost     Our  choice:  there  are  hundreds  of  filter  programs  purifying  water  through  a  dozen  different  mechanisms;  YOUR  JOB  IS  TO  KNOW  THE  OPTIONS   BEHIND  YOUR  PROJECT  &  TO  CHOOSE  THE  MOST  APPROPRIATE  –  BASED  ON  A  VARIETY  OF  FACTORS,  INCLUDING  AVAILABILITY,   RELIABILITY,  COST,  AND  YOUR  SPECIFIC  DESIGN  REQUIREMENTS     Tougher  Choice:  Business  Model  (Cost  Breakdown),  Distribution  Network,  Business  Model  (Filter  Model)     Key  Message:  Know  your  choices;  even  if  one  choice  is  obvious,  know  alternatives  &  have  backup  plans;  Don’t  be  afraid  to  make  changes   as  you  go     Business  Model:  Components  &  Decisions     Cost  Breakdown:  Know  Your  Distribution  Network  (everyone  needs  to  be  compensated  in  some  fashion     Look  at  entire  path  of  product  from  design  to  end  user     Think  through  fair  compensation     You  must  have  a  knowledge  of  motivations  of  people  in  country  &  along  your  supply  line     Motivation/compensation  may  not  always  be  intuitive  &  may  be  lower  cost  alternatives  to  your  initial  ideas     OUR  COST  MODEL     ALTERNATIVES:  GOVERNMENT,  USAID,  DIRECT  COST  APPROACH,  LOCAL  SUPPLIERS  (COLMADOS)     Distribution  Network     Access  to  end  user  is  key  &  will  vary  widely  depending  on  desired  end  user  of  product  (Think  American  living  in  NYC  versus  farmer  living  20   miles  from  town  vs.  Dominican  with  no  mode  of  transportation  vs.  remote  village  with  even  more  limited  access     USE  EXISTING  NETWORKS  AS  MUCH  AS  POSSIBLE;  DON’T  RECREATE  THE  WHEEL     OUR  CHOICE  –  EASY  INITIAL  NETWORK;  LOOKING  FOR  NEW  NETWORKS  (SANTO  DOMINGO,  PERU,  GUYANA;  LOOKING  FOR   EXISTING  NETWORKS  IN  ALL  OF  THESE  PLACES)     Use  existing  network  &  partnership;  minimize  creation  of  new  networks  and  maximize  usage  of  product  in  existing  network     ALTERNATIVES:  SIMILAR  TO  THOSE  FOR  COST  BREAKDOWN;  STORES,  COMMERCIAL  SELLERS  –  DISSADVANTAGE  IS  LACK  OF   OVERSIGHT  ON  PROGRAM  &  ABILITY  TO  PROVIDE  TRAINING/ENSURE  USAGE  (WE  REACH  FEWER  PEOPLE,  BUT  ARE  MORE   EFFECTIVE  WITH  THOSE  CONTACTS  –  FITS  ILAC  MISSION)     BUSINESS  MODEL  –  DESIGN  CONSIDERATIONS     DESIGN  NEEDS  TO  BE  APPROPRIATE  FOR  BUSINESS     WE  DISTRIBUTE  TO  A  WIDE  AREA  FROM  SINGLE  CENTRAL  LOCATION;  THEREFORE  SIZE,  WEIGHT  WERE  KEY     Conclusion  –  You  are  going  to  have  problems  you  can’t  anticipate,  but  making  conscious  choices  will  help  keep  you  in  the  right  direction     Be  wiling  to  make  changes  in  the  end,  work  quickly,  but  be  mindful  of  effects  of  changes  to  whole  downstream    

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