Etuce cyprus train the teachers

23 de May de 2013
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
Etuce cyprus train the teachers
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Etuce cyprus train the teachers

Notas do Editor

  1. Thank you so much for the ETUCE for inviting me here today to speak to you and learn with you. It is truly an honor, and I only hope that what I can share with you today will be valuable to you.
  2. In reflecting on the title of this conference, “The role of teachers in promoting peace,” it reminded me of why I came to the peace education field in the first place. For one thing, I was and still am a teacher myself, working as an English as a Second Language teacher, a grassroots community educator in Niger, as well as a yoga teacher, prior to finding my place as a peace educator. I remember the moment that I realized that I wanted to spend the rest of my life promoting peace. It was at the Global Article 9 Conference to Abolish War in Japan in May 2008.I had just moved to Tokyo to teach English as a Second Language. Prior to that, I had done a lot of peace-related things – I served for 2 years in the Peace Corps, I volunteered for environmental education organizations, I sought to understand other cultures and to broaden my perspective of the world. At the time, I didn’t realize that I was doing these things “for peace,” but in hindsight, each step makes sense, each step was a step on my path of creating peace in the world. I had just moved to Tokyo to teach English as a Second Language when I found a volunteer opportunity with an organization called PeaceBoat, which needed volunteers forits international conference to abolish war. I happened to get a break when Cora Weiss was giving the keynote speech. “It’s time to abolish war.” She repeated this over and over, using examples of things that humanity had abolished and overcome, such as slavery and apartheid. At one time, people probably felt as doubtful that we could abolish slavery as they do now about abolishing war. If we could abolish slavery, we could abolish war. Her argument made so much sense and spoke directly to my heart. Weiss recently gave a similar speech at the UN for the High Forum on a Culture of Peace: “The United Nations has decreed an end to slavery, colonialism, and apartheid. It has unanimously called for a Culture of Peace. Its mission is to ‘save succeeding generations from the scourge of war’.  It is time to abolish war.”As I listened to her words in the giant arena, standing alone but surrounded by over 10,000 people, I felt a pull, a calling – to promote peace in every aspect of my life. I had been cultivating a sense of inner peace through my yoga practice, and was always trying to volunteer or seek ways to promote peace in my spare time. But I want this to be my life, I remember thinking. I want everything I do to be towards promoting peace. I want this to be my life’s work. I felt the presence of the 10,000+ people around me, all of whom were working to abolish war and promote peace. I felt supported, encouraged, inspired, motivated. I want to dedicate my life to peace too, I thought. And at that moment I made a resolve to do just that. I felt I needed to learn more, so I started to search for master’s programs, and found a perfect fit through the peace education master’s at the university for peace in Costa Rica, where I earned my master’s degree.
  3. What  brought me to peace education, specifically, was the belief that, to paraphrase the UNESCO charter, war and peace begin in our minds, in our consciousness. And if that is true, then as the charter states, it is in our mind that peace needs to be constructed. In order to create peace, we need to change our minds. If the foundations of peace are to be created in our minds, then it must be something we can learn. And if we can learn it, logically, we need peace educators who will teach about peace! I saw a tremendous power in teachers as multipliers of peace. If you think about it, over the course of their career, one teacher affects hundreds if not thousands of students. What an amazing potential to change the world!  
  4. While teachers have a special role to play, this role is not limited TO teachers. We all have the choice to live our lives peacefully, and in turn to model peaceful behavior for others to follow. We all have the ability to share peaceful living practices with others, and to engage in dialogue in our community about issues relating to peace, justice, diversity, and equality. We all have the power to be teachers and leaders for peace – we simply need to answer the calling. The beautiful thing about promoting peace is that you really can do it through anything – whether you are working 9-5 for a peace nonprofit, or whether you are a mom or a teacher or a bus driver. We each can promote peace in our own little corner of the world.However, if peace can be taught and learned, then teachers have a particularly important role to play in their ability to truly shape the minds and hearts of so many students they encounter, and this underscored the need for teachers to have peace education training. All of our actions ripple out into the world, but teachers ripples have the potential to have farther-reaching effects.
  5. And that’s where Teachers Without Borders comes in. TWB’s mission is to connect teachers to information and each other to create local change on a global scale. TWB was founded on the principle that teachers are agents of social change. From the TWB web site:“At over 59 million, teachers are the largest group of trained professionals in the world. As transmitters of knowledge and community leaders, teachers are powerful catalysts for lasting global change. However, teacher professional development is often irrelevant, inconsequential, or missing entirely.Teachers must therefore have a support network to provide the resources, training, tools and colleagues they need to fulfill their important role. Teachers Without Borders offers that support.”This was the idea that TWB was founded upon, and out of which grew its flagship program, the Certificate of Teaching Mastery, a general teacher professional development course that grew out of the founder, Fred Mednick’s observations that teachers are neglected in the international development picture. Funders want to build schools, but they don’t want to contribute to developing skilled teachers to put in those schools. Don’t get me wrong, school buildings are important – but equally if not more important is putting a well-trained, passionate person in that school to teach.
  6. TWB’s programs include the certificate of teaching mastery, emergency education, the MDA program, voice of teachers, a peer-review online journal, country programs in various parts of the world, and finally the peace education program.
  7. In early 2010, sectarian violence broke out in central Nigeria, and TWB’s Country Coordinator, Raphael OgarOko, saw the need for peaceful, long-term solutions. He had been working in education and peacebuilding for a long time, and as the violence erupted, he firmly believed that Nigeria needed more than band-aid solutions and quick fixes. He saw education as the best long-term solution, saw the important role that teachers could play, and requested that TWB develop a teacher training program in peace education.This is where I came in. I was a master’s student at the University for Peace at the time, but I had my eye on peace education-related jobs, and I found a volunteer posting from TWB that they were looking to develop a teacher professional development program in peace education. So I, along with a team of about 8 other interns, worked to put together the content of the course. Around the time I graduated, we finished a draft of the project, and TWB hired me as a contractor to finalize it, make it coherent, and edit it.
  8. Let me tell you more about the peace education program itself – the star of the show, and my only child (other than my dog, Rocky, of course ). The TWB Peace Education Program was designed to teach teachers about peace education, to give them the space to reflect on what it means to be peaceful in their own lives and in their work, and then how to apply these ideas and principles in their lives and work.
  9. The program takes a three-pronged approachKnowledge – What is peace? Developing the understanding of peace-related conceptsSelf-reflection – What do these concepts mean to me as a human being? In my daily life?Application – How can I apply this in my life, classroom and community?Peace education is inherently contextual and should be strongly rooted in the setting where it is taught. As the program is a global initiative, it remains broad, with the idea that there are general peace education principles that are unifying and can be adapted to local contexts. In teaching and facilitating the program, we maintain that educators are experts in their local context and school. The idea is that they learn the general principles of the program and figure out how to apply it in their own setting. Thus today, I am sharing with you how I have applied peace education, and how I work with educators on it, but in terms of your own applications, you are the experts, and while I can guide you and advise you, ultimately it is you who will know best how to facilitate the program, what issues need to be addressed, and culturally relevant ways of imparting this information for transformation.
  10. Our philosophy is beautifully encapsulated in this quote by peace educator Pierre Weil, who said……Thus our emphasis is first, on the teachers to internalize these concepts, to be them, to live them, and to transforms themselves to be agents of peaceful change. I often hear from the particpants in our courses thatyes, this changes their work and approach to teaching, but it often has deep impacts on their personal lives and relationships as well.
  11. The program is divided into three sections: Core Concepts, Scope, and Pedagogy and Practice. In Part 1, Introduction and Core Concepts, we cover the history of peace education, the definitions (because there isn’t just one definition and we want to be clear that our approach is just one of many approaches) and core concepts such as negative and positive peace, nonviolence, and a culture of peace.
  12. Part 2 includes the myriad of fields that fall under the peace education umbrella such as conflict resolution education, human rights education, and environmental education.
  13. Part 3 emphasizes pedagogy and what it means to teach peace education – how do we do it? The program concludes by asking participants to create a peace education project, to apply in their local setting, to take everything they have learned in the course and put it into practice in the most relevant way possible.
  14. So this is what is on paper. This is the program that you can download for free online. But what does this look like in practice? How do we teach about peace education?
  15. In the internet age, I’m not sure that 15,000 downloads is a lot. A friend of mine uploaded a picture of baby sloths with teddy bears, and her picture received 500,000 – yes, half a million – views within 24 hours. I only with that many people had interest in a peace education program! But I digress….
  16. The program has been offered both online and offline in workshop format. I’d like to tell you a bit about both versions of the course.With respect to offline versions of the program have taken place in The Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Uganda, South Africa, the US, Canada and Mexico. I personally facilitated the workshops in North America.As peace education should be inherently contextual, each workshop had a life of its own. The workshops on the African continent were all run and organized by local facilitators who reached out to TWB wanting to offer the course. I would like to share with you a short video about our workshops in Northern Uganda, which gives you an idea about the experience of our partners and teachers there.In all of the areas where we have run in-person workshops, we get the endorsement of the local ministry of education office in order to ensure collaboration and support.I personally facilitated workshops in North America – in the US, Canada and Mexico, and I facilitate the online course. I would like to share with you a bit about both the workshops and the types of activities that we can do in both.
  17. In the in-person workshops, the emphasis is on experience, dialogue, listening, and sharing. For these workshops, it is very important that we practice what we preach, so to speak, and that through the workshops we model the types of learning that we hope teachers will espouse. Likewise, the program ends up looking different in each location where it is facilitated. Each time I facilitate it, it’s a little different depending on the group, and each time a local facilitator runs it, the use different activities and put a different emphasis on things. The program is usually shorter, on average 4 days, so it is impossible for us to cover all of the content in that amount of time. Sometimes there are follow-up sessions, and we also use an approach of presenting the workshop like a menu and the participants choose the elements that are most relevant. Some concepts, though, we make sure to cover in every workshop, such as the definitions, core concepts, and communication and conflict resolution.
  18. I found this very helpful! 
  19. As the mission of TWB is “connecting teachers to information,” a big part of what we do as well is connecting teachers to peace education resources – books, web site, lesson plans, networks etc.
  20. There are several different approaches to bringing peace education to the curriculum. It can be taught as a separate subject, integrated into some subject areas, or infused into all areas of school life so that it is a part of everything. While studying it as a separate subject or integrating it into some areas is better than nothing, ideally peace education will be a part of all facets of school life, and all areas of the curriculum/
  21. Which ever approach you are taking, it is helpful to think about entry points in the learning competencies of the educational system in which you are working.