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Niagara regional presentation april 27 2019

Niagara Region Board Trustees Training

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Niagara regional presentation april 27 2019

  1. 1. ADVOCATING FOR YOUR LIBRARY WITH IMPACTFUL DATA STEPHEN ABRAM NIAGARA REGION LIBRARY BOARDS APR. 27, 2019
  2. 2. NOT SIMPLE OR EASY NOT SIMPLE OR EASY
  3. 3. IDEAS ARE THE CURRENCY OF INFLUENCE
  4. 4. START WITH THE “WHY?” INFLUENCE OUT OF CONTEXT IS JUST A PARTY CONVERSATION.
  5. 5. The Essential Definitions
  6. 6. ADVOCACY IS DIFFERENT  Public Relations is getting your library’s message across – This is who we are and what we do, where and for whom.  Marketing is understanding your customer and how to best deliver services and products  Advocacy is marketing an ISSUE. Support and awareness are built incrementally. Advocacy is an agenda and not an event!
  7. 7. Propaganda bad, Spin good.
  8. 8. ASK YOURSELF . . . HOW DO LIBRARIES DIFFER AS AN ISSUE? ARE LIBRARIES DIFFERENT THAN OTHER COMMUNITY OR TAX FUNDED SERVICES? ARE LIBRARIANS DIFFERENT THAN LIBRARIES? VIEW FROM THE LISTENER’S POINT OF VIEW AND EXPERIENCE?
  9. 9. SELLING IDEAS YOU ARE ENGAGING IN AN INFLUENCE AGENDA. SELLING IS NOT A DIRTY WORD! POLITICS IS NOT A DIRTY WORD!
  10. 10. SELLING YOURSELF YOU ARE ENGAGING IN A LONG TERM RELATIONSHIP! INVEST YOUR PERSONALITY POSITION YOURSELF AND NOT MERELY YOUR LIBRARY’S RESOURCES AND SPACES. . .
  11. 11. YOUR COMMUNITY IMPACT AND VALUE YOUR RESOURCES BUT AS THE FOUNDATION FOR OUTPUTS NOT INPUTS YOUR COMPETENCIES – NOT JUST YOUR SKILLS YOUR INSIGHTS AND ADVICE YOUR NETWORK AND CONNECTIONS YOU! WHAT ARE YOU SELLING?
  12. 12. MANAGING YOUR BRAND EQUITY  Your social presence in person  Dress  Voice  Office  Handshake  Active listening  Conversation pieces  The Introvert Advantage
  13. 13. MANAGING YOUR BRAND EQUITY  Your digital social presence  LinkedIn  Facebook  Twitter  Instagram  Pinterest  Website  e-mail signature  Digital photo(s)  Google search  Publications  SEO SMO GEO
  14. 14. TO WHOM MUST YOU ADVOCATE? • YOUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS & STAFF… • YOUR COMMUNITY - USERS, NON- USERS, CLIENTS, CUSTOMERS… • POLITICIANS AND COUNCILS • USERS, CLIENTS, CUSTOMERS… • VENDORS… • WHO ELSE?
  15. 15. YOUR NETWORK
  16. 16. ESSENTIALS FOR ADVOCACY  Someone who cares  Courage  Trustworthiness  Passion  Belief  Proofs  Stories and Knowledge  Respect for whom you need to influence  Understanding beyond caricature (e.g. Politicians, the “Boss”, Teens, Seniors, The “Public”, Vendors...)
  17. 17. BEFORE YOU NEED IT!! When is Advocacy Needed?
  18. 18. AIDA: ATTENTION, INTEREST, DESIRE, ACTION ‘
  19. 19. WHY IS ADVOCACY NEEDED?  Is our environment changing? Then you need to advocate and re-position.  Are consumer or community expectations changing?  Survive or Thrive? Choose words carefully since they frame understanding . . .  To avoid downsizing of locations, budgets, staff, collections that hurt end- user success, opportunities and goals  To address shallow thinking about the web, access, electronic resources like e-books, or the role of community libraries  To speak up for the silent majority of library users  To position libraries in the minds of funders and decision-makers  To prepare for future success and to build a well of support and goodwill  To inoculate against political trends and competition for resources and capital within communities (police, fire, parks, etc.)
  20. 20. Advocacy Activities Must Be PLANNED!
  21. 21. QUALITIES OF EFFECTIVENESS 23  LISTEN first  Be visible  Be likable  Be FOR something . . . not just against a policy or position.  Be memorable  Thank supporters for the past support - well and often  Follow up with a thank you note  And don't complain, whine, attack, or be memorably negative.
  22. 22. THE PLAYERS 24  Library board members (trustees)  The CEO  Library management team  Library staff  The union leadership  Community partners  Other municipal departments (that may be partners or competitors for public or funding attention)  Cardholders  The community (groups, associations, individuals, donors)  Your associations (FOPL, OLA, OLBA, OPLA, AMPLO, ARUPLO, CELUPL, CULC) and suppliers (SOLS, OLS-N, vendors) who have a shared interest in your success.
  23. 23. TIPS  Be short and to the point  Avoid library jargon  Be visual (pictures and charts)  Avoid raw statistics and instead show measurements and impact  Make your point about impact memorable.  Train everyone connected to your talking points so that they can follow up and not just parrot. 25
  24. 24. REGIONAL GOVERNMENT REVIEW: KEY MESSAGES 26  Ontario’s local public library boards are voluntary & community-led. Unlike county library boards, which are entirely comprised of elected officials, community members are required by law to make up a majority of the members of local public library boards.  All of Ontario’s local library board trustees are unpaid, and take on these important roles to ensure that the public library is able to sustainably deliver critical resources and services to the people of their communities.  Local public library boards are independent from local municipal government, while at the same time are focused on responding to the needs and character of their communities. Many own their own public library buildings, are independently incorporated, and all maintain independent oversight of local public library budgets as set being guided by municipal fiscal decision-making.  This local & independent tradition, which has existed for over a century and is set out in the Public Libraries Act, and is what sets public library boards apart from other municipal boards established under the Municipal Act.  It reflects the fact that outside of major urban centres, local & independent public library boards are essential to ensuring that people are able to access critical resources and services through the public library close to home.  Our local library board members are community leaders, small business people and professionals – not always politicians. They understand how to deliver the most value from every dollar spent and work cooperatively to deliver the greatest impact for local people.  We strongly urge the reviewers, in preparing their recommendations for the Ontario government, to maintain the current framework for local, independent public library boards in Ontario.  We also welcome the opportunity to work together with the Ontario government to address outdated red tape that will help our local public library boards deliver essential resources and services even more cost-effectively.  Lastly we support our cooperative agencies that ensure cost-effectiveness and efficiencies in local library operations.
  25. 25. TIPS 1. Be politically neutral and non-partisan - respectful all the way. 2. Never confront but educate. 3. Be helpful and offer up further consultation, data, conversation, and advice. 4. Position the "People" as front and centre and focus on the needs of small and rural communities (which aligns with the PC base) 5. This review is only southern Ontario, so don't get distracted by other (important) Northern Ontario issues. 6. Highlight the great resources and productivity/cost-effectiveness of SOLS and other cooperatives/consortia (Simcoe County Library Cooperative, etc.) and recommend expansion of centralized services rather than amalgamation of library systems so that cost efficiencies are realized and local representation is honoured. 27
  26. 26. THE IMPACT FACTOR CHECKLIST  Brief  Succinct  Complete  Intelligible  Shock Value/Surprise  Upbeat  Illustrative  Appropriate  Personable  Memorable  Inspirational  Actionable 28
  27. 27. TEST YOUR STORY(IES) USING THESE TIP’S  Is it short and sweet? Can listeners quickly get the message and repeat it to others later  Is there just enough detail to get the point across or does it wander?  Does if answer the basic questions: Who? What? When? Where? How?  Will your audience appreciate the situation you are describing? Does this tale resonate?  Is the situation unusual in any way? Can the ending be predicted? Where’s the “punch line”? Are they likely to retell it?  Does the story have a happy ending? Finish on a high note.  Does this story implicitly illustrate an impact the library made and the outcome you want?  Does this story fit with your main business?  Will the audience identify with or care about your story’s hero?  Will the listener be able to remember this story? Can it be easily retold?  Does the story have the potential to cause listeners to think about what it means to them?  Does the story have the potential to spring the listener to a new level of understanding and action? 29
  28. 28. IMPLEMENTATION: TALKING POINT TOOLS  Tools  Presentations  Handouts  Annual Reports  Video (YouTube)  Social Media (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Tumblr, etc.)  Press releases  Print Media  Events 30
  29. 29. STRATEGIES – P’S AND C’S AND MORE  Who?  What?  Where?  When?  Why?  How?  (News)  Product  Place  Positioning  Promotion  People  Price  Public Relations  (Kotler) 31  Plan  Ploy  Pattern  Priorities  Position  Perspective  (Mintzberg)  Concept  Common Interest  Community  Context  Creativity  Content  Climate  Collaborators  Counsellors  Competitors  Citizens Proper Planning Prevents Poor Performance
  30. 30. CRAFTING MESSAGES Am I an introvert or extrovert or somewhere in between? Who is the general audience? Who is interested? What interests them? What should I do to pique their interest? Will they agree with what I have to say? And will they commit or just nod? If not (which will likely be the case!) what counter-arguments should I be prepared to answer?
  31. 31. KEY TACTICAL TIPS  Mirror body image and stance  Introduce others  Lead the conversation  Engage and Disengage  Share your ideas  People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.  Follow through
  32. 32. LOGIC AND VALUES Bias: Impact, Quality, Speed, Time-savings, Authority, Comprehensiveness, strategic alignment with community needs,... the Truth?! Why do you think there’s a problem at all? Is it conceptual or pragmatic? What are the costs? Is their perception of the ‘issue’ the same as your’s? Competition? What kind of solution do you propose? Does it ask me to do something or to understand something? Does it match the problem exactly? Is it a relatively better way, compatible with my methods, less complex, trialable, and observable?
  33. 33. PLAN WITHIN A PLAN • Identify your goal and message • Establish relationships with key decision makers • Work with key stakeholders, find new friends • Link with groups that may influence decisions • Stay up-to-date with research • Keep plans ongoing
  34. 34. Lobbying Grassroots Partnering
  35. 35. ROBERT CIALDINI'S SIX TACTICS  Authority  Consistency and commitment  Liking  Reciprocity  Scarcity  Social proof
  36. 36. BEYOND ELEVATOR SPEECHES
  37. 37. THE ELEVATOR SPEECH
  38. 38. TIMMIES’ COFFEE http://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_ioCJ2kqZyyU/TWY39FR9okI/AAAAAAAAFT4/HkdkuHriXFY/s1400/020611-Tim-Hortons-001a.jpg
  39. 39. THE QUICK BREAK: HOT DOGS OR DELI
  40. 40. LUNCH
  41. 41. SOCIAL – OUT(STANDING) IN THE FIELD
  42. 42. Can You Stand Out in a Crowd?
  43. 43. WHAT PUBLIC LIBRARIES SAY THEY MEAN - MISSIONS
  44. 44. TESTIMONIALS AND WORD-OF-MOUTH
  45. 45. Find Target, Aim, Shoot, Check-in
  46. 46. Be The Sun
  47. 47. Stand Out in a Crowd
  48. 48. ASK FOR IT!
  49. 49. Drive them to what they want
  50. 50. Speak Up!
  51. 51. MONEY IS NOT THE KEY.
  52. 52. TIME IS THE KEY
  53. 53. Thank Heaven You Have the Library!
  54. 54. WHAT RESOURCES DID WE HAVE ME – 3 DAYS A WEEK PLUS VOLUNTEERS NO MONEY BUT THERE’S MORE.
  55. 55. 4 YEARS AGO  We analyzed what we would need to be successful  To be honest – we had a lot but it was a MESS
  56. 56. SO WE TOOK A HARD, HONEST LOOK . . .  Did we know our numbers?  Can we prove our worth?  Do we have the influencing skills we need?  Do we have an army?  Can we develop the skills we need?  Do we have a relationship with our funders?  Can we execute affordable, influential marketing communications at scale that works?  Can we measure success by changing public policy AND receiving improved funding?  Are our governance, partnership, and relationship executables optimized?
  57. 57. WHAT DID WE DO?  Scalable Influencing webinars  Focused and upgraded our Professional Development game (LearnHQ)  Open Data Initiative, Real Measures and Trends, Data Analysis  Visualization focus  Scalable communication and marketing strategy  Can we focus on getting help in lobbying?  Can we promote all sizes of libraries including indigenous and French
  58. 58. THE REAL GOAL CULTURAL CHANGE A COALITION OF THE WILLING ENGAGEMENT WRIT LARGE
  59. 59. WE FIXED OUR PRIMARY STRUCTURAL PROBLEM WE LOOKED HARD AND IT WAS US! SOLS, OLS-NORTH, FOPL, & OLA (OPL, OLBA, OSLA, OLITA, OCULA, OBFO, FNPL+, ETC.) WE NOW SHARE THE SECTOR’S STRATEGIC INITIATIVES
  60. 60. DELIVERABLES  Libraries 2020 and Libraries 2025 Summit  ($18 million plus)  Community of practice  LearnHQ  Education Institute  AILP Annual Institute of the Library as Place  New builds, Renovations  Tagline  A Visit will get you Thinking  OpenMediaDesk IceBoxLogic
  61. 61. MORE DELIVERABLES - INFLUENCE  Statistics  5th annual report with Dr. Robert Molyneux  Full scale book on Qualitative and Quantitative measurement & communication  4 Statistics Summits and ten recorded webinars  Live and recorded Webinars  Social Media Growth  Dashboard, cohort training for 2+ years, OMD NewsRoom, Facebook site  Lobbying firm on retainer (Counsel Public Affairs) $80 million  CFLA OLA FOPL alliance (Truth & Reconciliation, Copyright, etc.)  GLAM Alliance  Political Action materials – handbooks, website, videos, visuals, strategy
  62. 62. GOALS AND SUCCESSES  AI App for libraries, Beacons trials  Library Card Book  4 more books with a vendor partner (GLAM)  Sharing beyond libraries with natural allies (GLAM and Parks&Rec)  New government relations and funding strategy alignment  $100 million goal for broadband funding  $80 million goal with OLA  $52 million goal for content in the pipes  Becoming best friends with 11 ministries and premier
  63. 63. SO LET’S TALK CULTURE  I mentioned a coalition of the willing  Use network theory  Provide a path and people will lead, tour and follow  Use the adoption curve  Share infections – have attitude go viral and local
  64. 64. FOPL STATISTICS ACTIVITIES STEPHEN ABRAM, MLA , FOPL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
  65. 65. FOPL TALKING POINTS The Public Library value proposition is strong and includes (but isn’t limited to):  Excellent Return on Investment  Strong Economic Development  Great Employment Support  Welcoming New Canadians & Refugees  Provable Early Literacy Development  Ongoing Support for Formal and Informal Education, Learning, and Homework Help  Serve the whole community equitably with inclusionary strategies  Affordable access to community resources  Broad Digital Access to resources, Government Services and e-government  Questions Deserve Quality Answers  Support Cultural Vitality  Recognized and Valued Leisure Activities for majority of Ontarians 69
  66. 66. WHAT’S THE ‘PROBLEM”?  We have a very COMPLEX (not complicated) value proposition  We have great competencies BUT we need to up our game on influence, advocacy, and focus.  We need the tools and we need to collaborate on them nimbly and quickly.  Proofs and Stories  Role of the engaged community member as spokesperson 70
  67. 67. OUR VIP POSITIONING  Value  Impact / Influence  Positioning 72
  68. 68. FOPL ACTIVITIES  Research on Value (i.e. School Readiness Study from OISE 2012, Market Probe Study 2010)  Coordination Meetings for all Library Statistics  Royal Society Testimony and Recommendations  FOPL EI Webinars on Ontario Data Collection 2011-12  iSchool Symposium: Defining New Metrics for Library Success  Summit on The Future of Libraries  Consulting contributions of Dr. Robert Molyneux  2020 Branding Research and Campaign  Hey, we had elections! 73
  69. 69. WHY MEASUREMENTS? With nicely crafted visuals libraries could do the following: 1. Communicate effectively with their trustees to get their advice on strategy as well as support. 2. Communicate budget 'asks' effectively that place the library in the community value delivery context. 3. Position budget growth (or at least lessen cuts) for community goal alignment and strategic impact. 4. Explain why technology and community room spaces are as valuable (maybe more) than books. 5. Position hybrid collection use properly in ‘circulation’. 6. Justify restoration or extension of library hours. 7. Show that your library either performs as well as or better than others or justify investments to perform to provincial, national or sectoral norms. 74
  70. 70. CORE STATISTICS (CLA DRAFT) 1. Service points and visits 2. Reference questions 3. Circulation (of particular item types) 4. Population served 5. E-resource holdings 6. Children’s membership and services 7. Staffing 8. Internet / PAC / Wi-Fi 9. Programming 10. Total operating expenditures 75
  71. 71. CORE MEASUREMENTS (FOPL DRAFT) 1. Overall value of a library membership (usage not cardholders) 2. Value of an 'open hour' (new metric unique to MPI TPL study that aggregates cost + value) 3. Economic impact (vs. ROI) (Households and Population) 4. Per Capita 'Usage" comparison across systems, groups (like small, medium. large, urban, suburban, rural, remote, FN, etc.), and jurisdictions (province/state) 5. A 'new' usage algorithm to modernize the old circulation stat and combine digital and print usage into a standard, comparable metric 6. A metric for technology access tied to the digital/economic divide(s) 7. A standard operational effectiveness metric (Value for Tax Dollars) 8. Average cost per household (taxes are based on household rather than population and better reflects funding models) 9. A metric for Use of Space (meetings, study, rooms) which was new for the MPI study and hadn't been done before 76
  72. 72. WE HAVE A DREAM . . .  Standards for our sector on impact metrics that lend themselves to the communication, influence, and financial challenges faced by public libraries to communicate their value to decision-makers and the public in the 21st Century context.  Build a set of standardized core statistics that build up to these measurements so we could lead most libraries to start working with a new program to communicate value (and build on their strengths in communicating pure 'usage').  Ultimately create a tool such as a specially designed spreadsheet or dynamic website where you input the numbers based on the standards and advice from some group (us?!) that spits out decent data, information and visuals easily on the other side. 77
  73. 73. USING YOUR LIBRARY’S STATISTICS AND KEY RATIOS Public Library Statistics MTCS Municipal Government OLS Other Provincial Ministries Services to Library Patrons
  74. 74. FOPL TALKING POINTS The Public Library value proposition is strong and includes (but isn’t limited to):  Excellent Return on Investment  Strong Economic Development Impact  Great Employment Support  Welcoming New Canadians & Refugees  Provable Early Literacy Development, school and college readiness  Ongoing Support for Formal and Informal Education, Learning, and Homework Help  Serve the whole community equitably with inclusionary strategies  Affordable access to community resources  Broad Digital Access to resources, Government Services and e-government  Questions Deserve Quality Answers  Support Cultural Vitality  Recognized and Valued Leisure & Community Activities for majority of Ontarians 79
  75. 75. BECOMING STRATEGIC  4 Years Ago  We analyzed what we would need to be successful  To be honest – we had a lot but it was a MESS  Who do we KNOW? Relationships  What do we have? Data-Information-Insight  How do we do this?  Why invest in our sector? (from their perspective)  How do we scale and build an army?  Can we do this affordably? (BTW we’re poor!)
  76. 76. WHAT DID WE DO?  Scalable Influencing webinars  Focused and upgraded our Professional Development game (LearnHQ)  Open Data Initiative, Real Measures and Trends, Data Analysis  Visualization focus – The OMD Dashboard & Network  Scalable communication and marketing strategy  Can we invest in professional help for lobbying?  Can we promote all sizes of libraries including indigenous and French? ONE VOICE
  77. 77. WE FIXED OUR PRIMARY STRUCTURAL PROBLEM WE LOOKED HARD AND IT WAS US! SOLS, OLS-NORTH, FOPL, & OLA (OPL, OLBA, OSLA, OLITA, OCULA, OBFO, FNPL+, ETC.) WE NOW SHARE THE RESPONSIBILITY FOR OUR SECTOR’S STRATEGIC INITIATIVES
  78. 78. DELIVERABLES  Libraries 2020 and Libraries 2025 Summit  (generated over $18 million)  Library Communities of Practice (PeerHQ CoP)  LearnHQ  Education Institute  AILP Annual Institute of the Library as Place  New builds, Renovations  Marketing Strength: Tagline  A Visit will get you Thinking Tagline, Public Opinion  OpenMediaDesk IceBoxLogic Project
  79. 79. MORE DELIVERABLES - INFLUENCE  Statistics  4th annual report with Dr. Robert Molyneux released in October 2018  New book on Qualitative and Quantitative measurement & communication  4 Statistics Summits and ten recorded Measurement webinars  Live and recorded Webinars  Social Media Growth  Dashboard, cohort training for 2+ years, OMD News Room, Facebook site  Lobbying firm on retainer (Counsel Public Affairs) $80 million  CFLA OLA FOPL national alliance (Truth & Reconciliation, Copyright, etc.)  GLAM Alliance coalition started  Political Action materials – election handbooks, website, videos, visuals, strategy
  80. 80. OUR VIP POSITIONING  Value  Impact / Influence  Positioning 85
  81. 81. FOPL ACTIVITIES  Research on Value (i.e. School Readiness Study from OISE 2012, Market Probe Study 2010, Economic & Social RIO/ROE)  Coordination Meetings for all Library Statistics  Royal Society Testimony and Recommendations  FOPL EI Webinars on Ontario Data Collection 2011-12  iSchool Symposium: Defining New Metrics for Library Success  Summit on The Future of Libraries  Consulting contributions of Dr. Robert Molyneux  2020 Branding Research and Campaign  Hey, we got elections! 86
  82. 82. COMING SOON  AI App for libraries, Beacons trials  Library Card Book  4 more books with a vendor partner (GLAM)  Sharing beyond libraries with natural allies (GLAM, Parks & Rec, etc.)  New government relations and funding strategy alignment  Becoming best friends with 11 Ministries and Premier  Measurements:  $100 million goal for broadband funding  $51 million goal for PLOG  $30 million goal for content in the pipes
  83. 83. SO LET’S TALK FINAL STRATEGY  I mentioned a coalition of the willing  We use network theory and build our army  We provide a path and people will enrol, lead, engage, and follow  Use the adoption curve  Share infections – have attitude & go viral and local
  84. 84. NEXT WEEK’S MEETING WITH THE MINISTRY SLIDES AND STRATEGY 90
  85. 85. STRENGTHENING ONTARIO’S LOCAL COMMUNITIES ONTARIO’S PUBLIC LIBRARIES: 91
  86. 86. PUBLIC LIBRARIES ARE ESSENTIAL TO PEOPLE AND FAMILIES ACROSS ONTARIO  Public libraries are local and adapt to the unique needs and priorities of the people and communities they serve.  They are Ontario’s farthest-reaching, most cost-effective institutions, helping millions of Ontarians reach their potential through self- improvement by providing:  Job training – and re-training – programs and resources  Small business support and community economic development  Equitable, reliable access to broadband internet in underserviced areas  Affordable, high-quality children’s programs for young families  Self-directed, lifelong learning  It’s no surprise that public libraries are consistently voted by people as one one of Ontario’s most trusted institutions (Pew Research Center, 2016; 2017; Varheim, 2014) Did You Know?  Every year, Ontarians of all ages make 155 million visits to their local public library.  Ontario’s local public libraries provide Ontarians with access to over 250,000 programs 92
  87. 87. PUBLIC LIBRARIES GENERATE AN IMPORTANT LOCAL ECONOMIC IMPACT  Public libraries drive and sustain economic development, especially in smaller towns and rural communities.  Entrepreneurs are able to access resources and classes to help start a business or re-train for a new job.  Libraries deliver a big return on investment – in communities large and small. DidYou Know?  Every dollar invested in public libraries generates significant direct economic benefits back to the community.  Milton: $1 = $5.67  Pickering: $1 = $5.85  Stratford: $1 = $7.48  Burlington: $1 = $5.64  Ottawa: $1 = $5.17 93
  88. 88. ENTREPRENEURS DEPEND ON LOCAL PUBLIC LIBRARIES Ken Orangeville, Ontario Like many other budding entrepreneurs and small business owners in communities across Ontario, Ken looked to his local public library in Orangeville to help get his idea off the ground. With a successful career in the computer game industry behind him, Ken founded 2Dogs Games so he could get more hands-on with the end-to-end development – especially the artwork and story – for a new computer game. Ken knew that to get his project started, he needed help with the craft of storytelling. The Orangeville Public Library was able to help with a series of writing workshops. Ken took part and worked closely over several months to hone his skills and approach, and credits the library’s creative writing sessions as an integral part of bringing his idea to life. He and his team have now published a comic to tell the backstory for the game, which continues to be developed and has already received accolades for its innovative focus on empathy and the mental health of its characters. 94
  89. 89. PUBLIC LIBRARIES HELP INVENTORS UNLOCK THE POTENTIAL OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES Alex Post Wellington County Ontario’s public libraries are a local resource for technology like 3D printers and software, online databases, Virtual Reality (VR) technology, Computer Numerical Control (CNC) technology, robotics and much more. The public library is a training ground for inventors and entrepreneurs, providing the space to unlock the potential of new technologies, start companies and create jobs here at home. Alex’s interest in the capabilities of 3D printing started at the Wellington County Library, and after taking a short course on the use of the printer at the library, he began designing his own prints. It’s more than just a hobby: Alex has designed a patent-pending medical device, the Puri-Purge, which allows anyone to easily turn a typical disposable water bottle into an emergency eye wash station. It’s already for sale in local retailers and through his company’s website, Good Neighbour Medical. Alex hasn’t stopped there. Since getting his start at the Wellington County Library, he’s developed and printed several other medical devices, including an emergency umbilical cord clamps and finger splints. The company has now purchased its own 3D printer as it production ramps up. The support and guidance of the library staff, as well as the access to ground-breaking technology, was crucial to making his entrepreneurial vision a reality. 95
  90. 90. PUBLIC LIBRARIES RESPECT THE NEEDS OF FAMILIES IN SMALL TOWN AND RURAL ONTARIO Crystal Perth, Ontario Across Ontario, many young families depend on their local public libraries to access children’s programs and resources that others take for granted. Crystal is a homeschooling mother of five who moved with her family to Perth as her husband studied at the local college. The welcoming and knowledgeable staff made the transition easy. From the beginning, the library became a place to connect with other young mothers. The librarians helped her balance the demands of raising a young family with support through enriching drop-in playgroups. They also helped Crystal access many resources that she’s come to rely upon as part of her kid’s education. The extensive and free children’s programming available at the local library (including STEM clubs, reading enhancements, tutoring, language learning, and media labs) has ignited her kids’ curiosity. In particular, Crystal credits big improvements in her children’s reading confidence and success to the capable, involved student tutors in the library’s Summer Literacy Program. The library has become a second home, helping young parents like Crystal’s ensure that their kids have the best start no matter where they live. 96
  91. 91. PUBLIC LIBRARIES SUPPORT JOB-SEEKERS Michael Bonfield, Ontario When Michael was laid off from his utilities job, he set out in search of new career opportunities. With no computer at home, and no experience applying for jobs online, Michael needed help to get started. He came to the Bonfield Public Library, where he has access to high speed internet via public computers and received free one-on-one computer tutoring. There, the library staff have also supported him in accessing skills training to upgrade his employment qualifications. Michael has now completed his first online course at the library “Pipeline Construction Safety Training (PCST)” a requirement for employment in the field, and was able to secure a great job in Northern Ontario. 97
  92. 92. PUBLIC LIBRARIES MAKE A DIFFERENCE FOR SENIORS’ QUALITY OF LIFE Carol Grand Valley, Ontario Like many seniors across rural Ontario, Carol has come to depend on her local public library not only as a place for learning, but as an important part of her social and physical well-being. Looking to become more active, Carol joined a senior’s low impact exercise class at the Grand Valley Public Library when it was formed eight years ago. More than just helping Carol stay healthy and active, the group has become an important part of her social life. They’ve become fast friends through the years, following up their exercise classes by going out for coffee and socializing. Together, they have helped each other through both the hard and joyous times that many seniors face. It's made a big difference for Carol and her fellow seniors in Grand Valley, and is a great example of the lifeline that public libraries for seniors across Ontario. 98
  93. 93. MUNICIPALITIES RECOGNIZE THE NEED FOR MORE PROVINCIAL SUPPORT • A growing number of Ontario’s municipalities and library boards have passed resolutions supporting the need for enhanced provincial funding to help make sure public libraries in these communities remain sustainable. 99
  94. 94. PUBLIC LIBRARIES NEED HELP  Public libraries are experts at maximizing the value of every dollar, but many public library budgets are being stretched to the limit– even though more people depend on them than ever before.  This is especially true for public libraries in smaller towns and rural communities across Ontario.  Predictable, flexible funding gives public libraries the discretion to make long-term investments that best meet the needs of their local communities.  Despite inflation, changes in technology and the increasing importance of libraries as vital institutions in smaller towns and rural Ontario, provincial base funding for public libraries has been frozen for the past 20 years.  Under the previous government, a patchwork of occasional, one-time grants focused on funding provincial priorities set in downtownToronto – not those of the local libraries and the communities they serve – and forced libraries to make “use it or lose it” decisions rather than smart, long-term investments based on local priorities.  Because of these significant funding shortcomings, libraries have become experts at getting the best value for every dollar.They’ve shared best practices to use innovation and technology to make library resources more accessible and responsive to people’s changing needs. DidYou Know? ✓ Provincial base funding for public libraries is provided through the Public Libraries Operating Grant (PLOG), which respects local decision-making. 100
  95. 95. ONTARIO CAN PROTECT LIBRARIES FOR THE PEOPLE THAT DEPEND ON THEM  Through a small investment in the province’s Public Libraries Operating Grant (PLOG) – a $17 million increase to annual provincial base funding shared across hundreds of Ontario’s libraries – the government can ensure the long term security of public libraries, especially in smaller towns and rural communities.  This investment represents less than a 2.3% increase for each of the 22 years that provincial base funding has been frozen – without adjusting for the impact of inflation.  Enhanced, predictable and flexible annual provincial base funding for public and First Nations libraries will allow them to address immediate issues and support long-term investment planning to address the changing needs of the people they serve.  It will let local public libraries make decisions that best respond to the needs of their own residents and communities – not bureaucrats at Queen’s Park.  Ontario can help make sure that all people – no matter where they live in the province – will continue to have access to public libraries and the critical local resources and services they provide. 101
  96. 96. QUESTIONS & DISCUSSION 103
  97. 97. THANK YOU WWW.FOPL.CA Stephen Abram, Executive Director 416-395-0746 sabram@fopl.ca
  98. 98. Source: 2018 FOPL Data Reports: https://bit.ly/2DDewd8 Are Public Libraries Growing in Ontario? In the past ten years Ontario’s public libraries have experienced: • A 66% growth in program attendance • Grown program numbers by 83% So that answer is YES!
  99. 99. Source: FOPL List of Studies: https://bit.ly/2K0mu0z Over 2 dozen Ontario, local economic, impact studies of public libraries in Ontario shows an average $5.41 for every dollar invested by the community. This is a very conservative ROI calculation on economic impact alone. Add in social ROI and it soars. So that answer is YES! Do Public Libraries Have an Economic Impact in Ontario?
  100. 100. Are Public Libraries Growing in Ontario? Ontarians make 200 million visits to their local public libraries in 2017. And that number continues to go up, both in-person and online. So that answer is YES! Source: 2018 FOPL Data Reports: https://bit.ly/2DDewd8
  101. 101. Are Public Libraries a Good Investment? So that answer is YES! Library Year Return on $1 Invested Toronto Public Library 2013 $5.63 Halton Hills Public Library 2014 $3.96 Milton Public Library 2014 $5.67 Pickering Public Library 2014 $5.85 Stratford Public Library 2015 $5.63 Sault Ste. Marie Public Library 2015 $2.36 Kawartha Lakes Public Library 2015 $7.05 London Public Library 2015 $6.68 Ottawa Public Library 2016 $5.17 Newmarket Public Library 2016 $7.85 Burlington Public Library 2017 $5.64 Hamilton Public Library 2017 $5.59 Vaughan Public Library 2017 $5.57 AVERAGE $5.59 Source: FOPL List of Studies: https://bit.ly/2K0mu0z
  102. 102. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: Are Public Libraries Helping People Find Jobs? A 2018 Nordicity study found that, just our users reported that 45% of them who used the library technologies found jobs successfully. So that answer is YES!
  103. 103. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: Are Public Libraries Transforming Ontarian’s Lives? A 2018 Nordicity study found enormous of levels of outcomes that are correlated with reducing poverty and cyclical poverty, decreasing social isolation, deceasing school bullying, and higher access to social services in a non-stigmatized environment. So that answer is YES!
  104. 104. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: A 2018 Nordicity study found that, just our computer users reported that 45% of them were using the library technologies to develop employable skills. So that answer is YES! Do Ontario’s Public Libraries Support Employment?
  105. 105. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: Are Public Libraries Growing Employment in Ontario? A 2018 Nordicity study found that, just our computer users reported that 36% of them were using the library technologies to develop job search skills. So that answer is YES!
  106. 106. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: Are Ontario’s Public Libraries Community Hubs? A 2018 Nordicity study found that, just our computer users reported that 26% of them reported an increased level of community engagement. So that answer is YES!
  107. 107. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: Are Ontario’s Public Libraries Growing in Social Engagement? A 2018 Nordicity study found that, just our computer users reported that 81% of them were using the library technologies reported an increased level of social engagement. So that answer is YES!
  108. 108. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: Are Public Libraries Supporting Ontarian Creativity? A 2018 Nordicity study found that 41% of our technology users used the library technologies to make creative products. So that answer is YES!
  109. 109. Source: School Libraries Reports: You bet! Our storytimes, summer reading programs and the Forest of Trees program have proven positive impacts on reading skills, school readiness, and standardized testing scores. So that answer is YES! Do Ontario’s Public Libraries Support Kids?
  110. 110. Source: OPLA Teen Services Report: Teen engagement at public libraries is on the rise, with opportunities for teens in communities big and small to be involved in the library by participating in teen advisory groups, strategic planning, maker spaces, and advising on physical teen space. So that answer is YES! Are Ontario’s Public Libraries Helping Teens?
  111. 111. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: D0 Public Libraries Support Businesses in Ontario? A 2018 Nordicity study found that, just our computer users reported that 26% of them were using the library to start, manage, or grow their businesses. So that answer is YES!
  112. 112. Public libraries remain a significant source for teen volunteer opportunities, with 93% of public libraries offering opportunities for teens to volunteer towards their OSSD volunteer hour requirements. So that answer is YES! Are Public Libraries Growing Teens in Ontario? Source: OPLA Teen Services Report:
  113. 113. 51.3% of Ontario libraries reported having a makerspace at their library – including 50% of libraries serving fewer than 5,000 people. With more libraries incorporating makerspace programming, OPLA has reason to believe this number has increased further since original data was collected. So that answer is YES! Are Public Libraries Helping Teens Grow in STEAM Ontario? Source: OPLA Teen Services Report:
  114. 114. Source: MarketProbe Canada Report Are Public Libraries Growing in Ontario? The average Ontario public library cardholder visits their local public library in person 8.9 times each year, with up to 2-3 times as many online & digital visits – with the latter highest in small and rural communities. So that answer is YES!
  115. 115. Source: 2018 FOPL Data Reports:
  116. 116. Source: 2018 FOPL Data Reports: https://bit.ly/2DDewd8
  117. 117. Source: 2018 FOPL Data Reports: https://bit.ly/2DDewd8
  118. 118. Do Public Libraries Partner for Teens in Ontario? Public libraries are an important community partner, with libraries reporting more partnerships with diverse community agencies in support of effective teen services. Now, 82% of libraries are partnering with local schools and 50% are partnering with social services agencies. So that answer is YES! Source: OPLA Teen Services Report:
  119. 119. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: You bet! A 2018 Nordicity study found that, 44% of respondents reporting using technology at the public library were introduced to a new technology. 52% of those introduced to a new technology were over age 55. So that answer is YES! Are Public Libraries Supporting Seniors in Ontario?
  120. 120. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: You bet! A 2018 Nordicity study found that, 68% of respondents reporting using technology at the public library were over age 55. • So that answer is YES! Are Public Libraries Supporting Seniors in Ontario?
  121. 121. Of course not! Ontario’s public libraries circulated over 125 million print books in 2017. and there were e-books too so we let our cardholders choose. So that answer is No! Have Public Libraries abandoned print Books in Ontario? Source: 2018 FOPL Data Reports: https://bit.ly/2DDewd8
  122. 122. TeensTeens Moms Kids 55+ Readers & Creators Families Who Uses Public Libraries? Students Adults 20, 30, & 40 Something s Homeless LGBT Poor Parents Voters Businesses Me! Me! Me! Me! Me! Me! Me!
  123. 123. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: A 2018 Nordicity study found that, 44% of respondents reporting using technology at the public library were introduced to a new technology. 52% of those introduced to a new technology were age 55+. So that answer is YES! Are Public Libraries Doing Tech in Ontario?
  124. 124. A 2018 Nordicity study found that, 63% of respondents reporting using technology at the public library identified as low income. So that answer is YES! Are Public Libraries Supporting Poverty Reduction in Ontario? Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report:
  125. 125. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: A 2018 Nordicity study found that, 92% of those introduced to a new technology continued to use it. 84% respondents reporting using technology at the public library reported increased digital comfort with using one or more services. So that answer is YES! Is Public Library Technology Working?
  126. 126. Are Public Libraries Lending Wi-Fi? Many do. Ontario’s public libraries reporting having over 1,000 Wi-Fi hotspots to lend! Many lend tablets, e-readers, and laptops too. So that answer is YES!
  127. 127. Sure are! The most recent 2017 data shows that between 29% and 89% of public libraries have maker spaces! So that answer is YES! Are Public Libraries Doing STEAM? Source: 2018 FOPL Data Reports: https://bit.ly/2DDewd8
  128. 128. In 2017 over 223,000 Ontarians took e-courses through the library’s website. So that answer is YES! Are Public Libraries Supporting e-learning? Source: 2018 FOPL Data Reports: https://bit.ly/2DDewd8
  129. 129. Do Public Libraries Visit the Homebound? In 2017 Public Libraries made 60,000 visits to homebound cardholders (and more at daycares, hospital, and nursing homes)! So that answer is YES! Source: 2018 FOPL Data Reports: https://bit.ly/2DDewd8
  130. 130. We’re free and we’re supported as a public benefit by tax dollars. We cost less than 18 cents per day – if Canada still had pennies! So that answer is YES! Are Public Libraries Affordable in Ontario? Source: 2018 FOPL Data Reports: https://bit.ly/2DDewd8
  131. 131. Source: OPLA Child services Report: http://accessola2.com/opla/ChildandYouthReport2015.pdf Circulation of children’s materials make up 24% of overall circulation, while children’s budgets only make up 17% of overall spending, indicating that libraries get more value from children’s materials. The percentage of library staff in Child Services is highest (23%) in communities with populations in the 15,000 to under 50,000 category. So that answer is YES! Are Public Libraries Great for Kids in Ontario?
  132. 132. Do Public Libraries Do Digital? Sure do, and we’re on the forefront of providing e-books, e-magazines, audiobooks, and streaming media! So that answer is YES!
  133. 133. Does the Province support Public Libraries in Ontario? The province of Ontario provides less than 1/100 of a single cent per day per capita to ALL libraries in Ontario and hasn’t raised that in 22 years
  134. 134. It’s fun to come to your library. Most offer 3D printing but there’s more – photo and video editing, woodworking, knitting, and a limitless range of creative programs. So that answer is YES! Are Public Libraries Helping us Make and Create? Source: 2018 FOPL Data Reports: https://bit.ly/2DDewd8
  135. 135. Are Public Libraries Do Social Media? We love social media. Follow your local library on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and more! Learn about programs, courses, events, and new content. Ontario’s public libraries are growing beyond 25 million social media visits So that answer is YES!
  136. 136. Source: 2018 FOPL Data Reports: https://bit.ly/2DDewd8 Do Public Libraries Use Volunteers? Public Libraries engage over 14,500 volunteers, students, co-op students, and interns every year. So that answer is YES!
  137. 137. Source: Check out the FOPL website: Do Public Libraries Have Challenges? Yes. We struggle and succeed in the same challenges our communities face. Technology juggernauts, growing diversity, changing content formats, funding challenges, and so many more. Just adapting to change but change is our tradition! So that answer is YES!
  138. 138. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: Are Public Libraries FUN in Ontario? Surely you jest! We’re fun for everyone and all-ages And we’re inclusive and welcoming too. So that answer is YES!
  139. 139. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: Are Public Libraries Lending e-Books? Of course! An average public library in Ontario has over 30,000 e-books to lend. So that answer is YES!
  140. 140. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: Are Public Libraries Adapting to the 21st Century? Other public benefit sectors look to public libraries in Ontario for models for adapting well to dynamic change. We’re growing and thriving. So that answer is YES!
  141. 141. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: Are Public Libraries Growing in Ontario? Do libraries provide databases that are higher quality than Google. Ontario’s public libraries subscribe to over 5,600 high quality databases that don’t get found on Google! So that answer is YES!
  142. 142. Source: Market Probe Canada Are Public Libraries Important in Ontario? 72% of 55+ residents say the underfunding the public library would have a major impact on their lives. So that answer is YES!
  143. 143. Are Public Libraries Growing in Ontario? Public Libraries run every type of event for every interest. Crafts, travelogues, technology, book clubs, knit & Natter, and thousands more! So that answer is YES!
  144. 144. Source: Market Probe Canada • Public libraries are important because they promote literacy and a love of reading • By providing free access to materials and resources, the public library plays an important role in giving everyone a chance to succeed • Having a public library improves the quality of life in a community So that answer is Everything! What Does the Public See as the Role Public Libraries in Ontario?
  145. 145. Source: Nordicity’s BRIDGE Report: Do Ontarians Want More from the Public Library? They’re asking for MORE: Programs that allow people to try out the newest tech devices or applications, such as 3D printers or laser cutters; Library kiosks located throughout the community where people can check out books, movies or music without having to go to the library itself; personalized online accounts that give you recommendations based on your past library activity; cell phone apps that allows you to access library services from your mobile phone; online research services where you could pose questions and get responses from librarians; cell phone apps that helps you locate material easily in the library using GPS; E-book readers already loaded with the book you want to read; Instruction on how to use handheld reading devices and tablets; Classes on how to download library e-books to handheld devices; A digital media lab where you could create and upload new digital content like your own movies or e-books . . . So, The Answer is Yes

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