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1-220927194243-8ce44626.pptx

  1. 1. CLIENT PROJECT RESEARCH SAM DYSON
  2. 2. AUDIENCE This tour guide is aimed at a demographic between the ages of 18 and 24 to make the city of York more appealing to younger people, as opposed to older people – arguably, the current status quo. Although the live brief provided to us sets some rules to help keep our guides more original (e.g., no drinking tours/pub crawls), we have the freedom to base the project on anything we want if it’s relevant to making the city of York more appealing. I plan to make a guide that covers as many interests as possible since basing it on one specific scene will only narrow down the audience and give it less value. On the other hand, reading shouldn’t be oversaturated and overwhelming. For this project, I'll need to conduct two types of audience research – secondary research (reading pre-existing information from reliable sources) and primary research (using thoughts/opinions from myself and some of my friends since we fit into the same demographic).
  3. 3. AUDIENCE: SECONDARY RESEARCH https://www.statista.com/statistics/1123890/hobbies-done-at-home-in-the-united-kingdom-by-age-group/ According to a survey conducted in 2020 by Statista based on young people’s hobbies, most respondents said they enjoy listening to music as a pastime. Although listening to the radio is also included within the same section, most of the participants are likely to use streaming services or at least other music formats instead (e.g., vinyl/CD/cassette collection). Music being the most popular interest is convenient since I’m also very interested in listening to and producing music. Watching television is the second biggest interest found in the survey. Although cable/satellite television isn’t as obsolete in the modern age as radio, I feel these participants are more likely to use streaming services like Netflix and Disney+. Then again, I visit the cinema for big releases with friends, so this could still be a point of interest for the guide. Cooking & baking are the third biggest interest in the survey, though I don’t know anyone who’s around my age that notably does either of these as a hobby, so I’m skipping it for now and focusing on playing video games. While I’m not big into gaming like I was as a kid, most of my friends own a console, so I plan on including places such as gaming lounges and stores within the York area. Book reading, arts & crafts, photography, home DIY, puzzle solving, and sewing/knitting are significant sections in the survey that can be included in the visitor guide as one generalised section since they all have a creative aspect involved. The rest of the survey includes niche interests such as model building and collecting stamps/magazines, so I'm not adding these to the guide. I won't use other similar hobbies either since they'd only reach specific groups.
  4. 4. AUDIENCE: SECONDARY RESEARCH According to ONS’ Leisure time in the UK study conducted in 2015: • Men are more likely to “[…] [spend] more time on leisure activities than women (an average of six hours and nine minutes compared with five hours and 29 minutes per day respectively).” • “The gender gap was greatest in the Northwest of England (men spent seven hours per week more than women on leisure time).” • “The majority of leisure time for both men and women was spent consuming mass media, for example, watching TV, reading or listening to music (16 hours and 24 minutes per week for men and 14 hours and 23 minutes for women).” • “[…] men [spend] more time per week on sports, hobbies and computer games than women (four hours and 29 minutes and two hours and 29 minutes per week respectively), while women spent more time doing social activities (four hours and 19 minutes compared with three hours and two minutes per week for men).” Although this study was written over five years ago (pre-pandemic) and isn’t as focused on the relevant age demographic, I still think it holds some relevance for this guide. On the other hand, leisure activities are progressively becoming more unisex and less influenced by gender stereotypes, so I plan on focusing more on age demographics than gender demographics. The same study also mentions how: • “Those from high-income households were more likely to [engage] in leisure activities on the weekends than those from low-income households, who were more likely to be working.” • “[…] those employed full-time [spend] the least amount of time performing leisure activities (four hours and 48 minutes per day), compared with those who were employed part-time (five hours and seven minutes per day).” • “[…] enjoyment of leisure was similar across all working groups.” This reveals a significant contrast in time spent on leisure activities between higher and lower-income households. Although the target age demographic for this project is less likely to be employed compared to someone older, most still live with their parents/guardians, whose financial status will impact their pastime. Young people in higher-income households aren't as expected to help around the house or even find jobs to help pay bills/food compared to those in lower-income households, giving them more of an option to pursue their hobbies and other interests. Although this doesn't affect this project considerably, it still gives me an idea of the financial aspects of the places I'll include. https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/nationalaccounts/satelliteaccounts/articles/leisuretimeintheuk/2015
  5. 5. AUDIENCE: SECONDARY RESEARCH According to GWI’s “How effective are ads on social media?” webpage from 2022: • “98% of consumers globally say they’ve visited a social network in the past month[…]” • “27% of social media users say they use social platforms primarily to research and find products to buy, a figure that varies widely by age and region of the world.” • “[…] 26% of social media users say they tend to buy brands they see advertised […]” • “[…] global social media ad spend is projected to grow 15% annually through to 2024.” • “Gen Zs and millennials make up 68% of those using social media for product discovery.” • “[…] [Generation Z and millennials are] among the heaviest users of social media globally… • “… [Millennials] spend over 2.5 hours per day on social media, • “[…] [Generation Z spends] just under 3 hours per day on various platforms.” This demonstrates the influence of social media on both consumers and retail sales. It gives businesses the potential to market themselves to initially untapped markets and sell their products more efficiently by taking advantage of the rising popularity of social media platforms such as TikTok and Instagram. The info-graphs provided on the right from the same study suggest that: • Entertainment accounts (meme/parody accounts) have the largest number of followers that clicks on advertisements – friends, family, and acquaintances are dead last. • The average person is slightly more likely to engage with advertisements from charities and other non-profit organisations https://blog.gwi.com/trends/ads-on-social-media/
  6. 6. AUDIENCE: PRIMARY/EMPIRICALRESEARCH Since I fit into this demographic, I plan to add my interests to the guide, cross-referencing it with my secondary research and keeping it as non-biased and representative as possible. My friends are also in the same age group, so I plan on asking them about their interests. As mentioned in my secondary research, one of my biggest interests is music (both listening to and producing myself) which is helpful since it links with the studies I’ve included to use in the project. Although I don’t collect any vinyls or CDs, I still go to HMV, and other independent record shops since some of my friends collect them themselves - this is very useful, and I can include places like record shops in this tour guide. Another one of my and my friends' interests is streetwear. Although streetwear stores aren't as prominent in York compared to other nearby cities like Leeds and Manchester, including local outlets would be beneficial for both readers and store owners since smaller, independent streetwear stores are often closing due to lack of sales, causing people to travel to places like Leeds to buy clothing at gentrified prices. Video gaming is also something that was brought up in my secondary research. While I’m not big into it like I was as a kid, every friend of mine owns a console which I enjoy using when I’m at their house. There are a couple of gaming lounges in Leeds where you can pay an entry fee to play video games for a couple of hours, and it wouldn’t be surprising if there were a few smaller ones in York. The video game industry has been a massive and dominating market for around three decades now, and it’s not surprising how most of this target demographic enjoys it and considers it their favourite pastime, so it deserves its own section in this guide. Creative hobbies such as photography and arts & crafts are also found in my secondary research, and it helps that some of my friends are into similar interests. However, they aren’t likely to visit local workshops for finger painting or origami classes, so I’ll most likely add a section for local, independent stores where they can buy related products.
  7. 7. AUDIENCE: PRIMARY RESEARCH Participants selected a range of answers for this question, but fortunately, none answered "Rarely" or "Never." This shows me that people visit their town/city at least once a week, giving the visitor guide a purpose. I'll also add a similar question in a questionnaire for my app mockup to give the user specific suggestions – trails that span a few hours, one day, several days, etc. Question 1: “How often do you go into your town/city?” For additional primary research, I've conducted my own survey and sent it to a group of people between the ages of 16 and 24. Since none of them live in York, I've had to word the questions, so they apply to a general group of people. Unfortunately, the service I used to create the survey only allows you to read the results of the first ten participants under their free plan – inconvenient, but the data that’s available is more than enough.
  8. 8. AUDIENCE: PRIMARY RESEARCH Question 2: “How much time do you spend when going out?” Most participants said they spend around 3 hours or more on average when going out into their town/city. None of the participants said they never go outside, which makes sense since none of them said they never go out in the last question. I’ll also add a similar question in a questionnaire for my app mockup to give the user specific suggestions – trails that span a few hours, one day, several days, etc.
  9. 9. AUDIENCE: PRIMARY RESEARCH Question 3: “How much money do you spend when going out?” When asked how much the participant spends going out into their town/city, the majority answered between £15 and £30. 20% said they spend between £35 and £60. 10% said they spend between £65 and £95. 10% said they spend between £5 and £10. And no participants said they spend anything when going out. None of them also said they spent over £100. This shows how people are willing to spend money when going out, but they aren’t likely to spend more than £30 on average (and won’t spend over £100). I’ll also add a similar question in a questionnaire for my app mockup to give the user specific suggestions – free trails, trails with cheap attractions, trails with more expensive attractions, etc.
  10. 10. AUDIENCE: PRIMARY RESEARCH Question 4: “Which of these places have you visited in the last month? Select as many as you want” For this question, I provided a range of places in most major towns/cities that people visit often. I asked the participants to select which of them they’ve visited within the last month (e.g., clothing stores, restaurants, local landmarks, etc.) The top three places were clothing stores, restaurants (not including Wetherspoons), and bars/pubs (including Wetherspoons), which 80% of participants equally selected. Music/vinyl stores and video game stores/gaming lounges tied second in groups of frequently visited places, which 60% of participants selected. Night clubs, markets, and charity shops ranked third most popular group of popular places, which 50% of participants selected. Only 20% of participants said they’d visited local landmarks within the last month, making it the least popular selection. No participants provided their answers under the “Other” section, but this might’ve resulted from how the website’s surveys are presented. Although the variety of answers will make my visitor guide more challenging to cater to a specific demographic, it allows me to make it more detailed and appeal to more people.
  11. 11. AUDIENCE: PRIMARY RESEARCH Question 5: “Would you download a free app that gives you a generated bucket list of stuff to do and places to eat in your town/city for the day after filling out a short questionnaire like this one? It would also provide relevant info such as available car park spaces, ticket fees, live bus/train schedules and more.” 90% of participants said they would download a free app that gives suggestions of places to visit across their town/city and provides information like bus/train schedules and available parking spaces. Although these participants most likely answered yes to either being nice or finishing the survey quicker, some would probably download a similar app if there was an incentive.
  12. 12. EXISTING PRODUCT RESEARCH
  13. 13. EXISTING PRODUCT RESEARCH: “ONLY IN YORK” VISITOR GUIDE VisitYork is a subsidiary of VisitBritain - the official tourist board of the United Kingdom. They specialise in a wide variety of guides for notable cities and towns throughout each country, pointing out the landmarks and tourist attractions for newcomers and frequent visitors who’d like to explore even further. VisitYork’s most popular selection of guides seems to be their annual guide titled “Only in York.” However, they also create mini guides, festive theme guides (e.g., Halloween and Christmas guides), restaurant guides, and more. The front covers of all their annual visitor guides include the York Minster as the background image as it’s considered York’s most-known landmark and embraces the city’s extensive history. The text on the cover is very simple and straight to the point. It includes the guide's title, the year it was published, a social media hashtag, and the organization's name. Keeping the front cover as minimalistic as possible (without sacrificing the quality) lets potential readers know that your visitor guide will be clear and organised without even opening it.
  14. 14. EXISTING PRODUCT RESEARCH: “ONLY IN YORK” VISITOR GUIDE Like the front cover subliminally suggested, the inside of this visitor guide is straightforward and coherent. Several sections in this guide are dedicated to a selection of themes (e.g., festivals, restaurants, tourist attractions, etc.). They’re easy to find using the index within the first few pages. Each section provides information about stores, attractions, and current festivals within the area. They'll often include the name and activity along with a brief paragraph to describe it. Pictures are also used throughout the guide to give the reader a visual image of these activities – it also keeps the booklet engaging and spaces out the text so it doesn’t feel cluttered together. The back of the guide provides a map of the city along with car park information, relevant phone numbers, and a map grid with co-ordinates underneath to navigate these locations easier. Although most people use their phones for directions to places, it’s still useful to include this just in case they can’t use them or if they don’t have one on them. The design and layout of these guides have given me some ideas on how I’ll plan my own visitor guide out.
  15. 15. EXISTING PRODUCT RESEARCH: VISITYORK SELFIE TRAIL Alongside its visitor guides, VisitYork also does its own trails, including its own “Selfie Trail.” The VisitYork website says they “picked out the most iconic photo spots in the city so you can take sensational selfies to make your Instagram followers swoon.” This trail includes sites such as the York Railway Station, Shambles, York Minster, and other well-known places in the city within a 600-metre radius. Although my own visitor guide won’t be focused solely on landmarks and popular centres, and won’t be a trail like this, it still gives me an idea about the distance of locations I’ll include in my project.
  16. 16. EXISTING PRODUCT RESEARCH: MONOCLE TRAVEL GUIDE SERIES Monocle is an organisation based in London and produced by Winkreative Ltd. It provides global affairs/lifestyle magazines and runs its own 24/7 radio station. It was founded by Tyler Brûlé - a Canadian entrepreneur, Financial Times columnist, and founder of Wallpaper* magazine. They also sell a collection of travel guides for capitals and other notable locations in several countries across the globe. These guides share the same modern, contemporary layouts on the covers, and the spines include a number that represents their order of release, giving people the incentive to collect them all. The top of the front covers includes the book series' title next to the order number and brand icon, followed by the location's name underneath in a bigger text size. Underneath that, the cover lists the different categories found in the book (e.g., retail, hotels, etc.) Each book also includes an illustration based on that specific country’s culture (e.g., London has a marching Queen’s guard alongside a corgi wearing the matching uniform, New York has a taxi cab being hailed, Toyko has a sumo wrestler, etc.) which gives these books more of a casual feel and keeps it visually appealing to potential readers.
  17. 17. EXISTING PRODUCT RESEARCH: MONOCLE TRAVEL GUIDE SERIES Each of these books’ pages shares a similar casual feel to the “Only in York” guides – names of places to visit, short descriptions, and appealing images to keep the pages from looking overly crowded. However, unlike the "Only In York" guides, the places mentioned also contain numbers readers can use in the map section included on each page to find them easier rather than constantly checking the back pages and using map grid coordinates. Some pages also contain small illustrations like the front cover, which keep the guide more visually appealing. When designing my visitor guide, I'll use simple yet effective elements found throughout the Monocle Travel Guidebooks. Their designs are superior to the "Only In York" travel guides, and a map in each section with location markers would be helpful for someone new to the city of York who doesn't know where different streets are.
  18. 18. EXISTING PRODUCT RESEARCH: ATLAS OBSCURA Atlas Obscura is an online magazine and travel company founded in 2009 by author Joshua Foer and documentary filmmaker/author Dylan Thuras. They’re well known for their website, mobile app, and book collection under the same name. The company was founded in 2006 when Joshua and Dylan created a blog dedicated to overlooked Jesuit scholar Athanasius Kircher called "The Proceedings of the Athanasius Kircher Society," where they listed places around the world that Kircher would visit if he were alive today. This passion project soon became what we know as "Atlas Obscura" - a massive index of hidden, obscure locations across the globe for people to find and visit (the title itself even translates to "obscure maps"). The layout of their book collections is similar to the ones in the Monocle Travel Guidebooks – maps, relevant images, and descriptions of places. However, the text inside is more detailed and reads like an encyclopedia.
  19. 19. EXISTING PRODUCT RESEARCH: ATLAS OBSCURA Their website and mobile app also list obscure, unknown travel destinations worldwide. However, it allows users to add hidden locations too. The website and mobile app include a map with markers for users to find these locations. You can also see short descriptions of the places if you click on them, along with a link that brings them to either the place’s official website or a Wikipedia page of the landmark. Since this is the only product I’ve included with a mobile app, it’ll be the most effective inspiration for the layout of my visitor guide since I plan on creating an app mockup for it.
  20. 20. EXISTING PRODUCT RESEARCH: @bucketlist on TikTok @bucketlist is a TikTok account with over 200,000 followers that posts videos of different locations all around the United Kingdom. Unlike most of the other products listed in this pro-forma, @bucketlist doesn’t show places in a specific area of the UK – several videos show a wide variety of locations across the country. There are also a variety of different video themes, such as “UK [place/activity] you must experience this summer” and “Can you survive with £10 in [town/city]?”. Although my visitor guide won’t be video-based like this TikTok page, it still gives me ideas for different themes I could use (e.g., what you can do in York with a specific budget, the best [type of food] in York, etc.)
  21. 21. BIBLIOGRAPHY
  22. 22. BIBLIOGRAPHY 1. Atlas Obscura 2. @bucketlist on TikTok 3. Monocle Travel Guide Series 4. VisitYork’s “Only In York” Series 5. VisitYork’s Selfie Trail

Notas do Editor

  • Analyse your audience. Use info from the client and any other resources you can to build a picture of them.

    Consider age, gender, socioeconomic status, geodemographics, psychographics and mainstram/niche.

    There are a whole range of resources such as NRS, Acorn, YouGov, your client and a host of psychographic profiles.

    You can also consider some primary research in to your audience as well.
  • Analyse your audience. Use info from the client and any other resources you can to build a picture of them.

    Consider age, gender, socioeconomic status, geodemographics, psychographics and mainstream/niche.

    There are a whole range of resources such as NRS, Acorn, YouGov, your client and a host of psychographic profiles.

    You can also consider some primary research in to your audience as well.
  • Analyse your audience. Use info from the client and any other resources you can to build a picture of them.

    Consider age, gender, socioeconomic status, geodemographics, psychographics and mainstream/niche.

    There are a whole range of resources such as NRS, Acorn, YouGov, your client and a host of psychographic profiles.

    You can also consider some primary research in to your audience as well.
  • Analyse your audience. Use info from the client and any other resources you can to build a picture of them.

    Consider age, gender, socioeconomic status, geodemographics, psychographics and mainstream/niche.

    There are a whole range of resources such as NRS, Acorn, YouGov, your client and a host of psychographic profiles.

    You can also consider some primary research in to your audience as well.
  • Analyse your audience. Use info from the client and any other resources you can to build a picture of them.

    Consider age, gender, socioeconomic status, geodemographics, psychographics and mainstram/niche.

    There are a whole range of resources such as NRS, Acorn, YouGov, your client and a host of psychographic profiles.

    You can also consider some primary research in to your audience as well.
  • Analyse your audience. Use info from the client and any other resources you can to build a picture of them.

    Consider age, gender, socioeconomic status, geodemographics, psychographics and mainstram/niche.

    There are a whole range of resources such as NRS, Acorn, YouGov, your client and a host of psychographic profiles.

    You can also consider some primary research in to your audience as well.
  • Analyse your audience. Use info from the client and any other resources you can to build a picture of them.

    Consider age, gender, socioeconomic status, geodemographics, psychographics and mainstram/niche.

    There are a whole range of resources such as NRS, Acorn, YouGov, your client and a host of psychographic profiles.

    You can also consider some primary research in to your audience as well.
  • Analyse your audience. Use info from the client and any other resources you can to build a picture of them.

    Consider age, gender, socioeconomic status, geodemographics, psychographics and mainstram/niche.

    There are a whole range of resources such as NRS, Acorn, YouGov, your client and a host of psychographic profiles.

    You can also consider some primary research in to your audience as well.
  • Analyse your audience. Use info from the client and any other resources you can to build a picture of them.

    Consider age, gender, socioeconomic status, geodemographics, psychographics and mainstram/niche.

    There are a whole range of resources such as NRS, Acorn, YouGov, your client and a host of psychographic profiles.

    You can also consider some primary research in to your audience as well.
  • Analyse your audience. Use info from the client and any other resources you can to build a picture of them.

    Consider age, gender, socioeconomic status, geodemographics, psychographics and mainstram/niche.

    There are a whole range of resources such as NRS, Acorn, YouGov, your client and a host of psychographic profiles.

    You can also consider some primary research in to your audience as well.
  • List all products researched in previous sections. Include anything additional you have watched/read in preparation for production. Alphabetise your list.

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