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Scrum Guide & SAFe Agile booklet

Scrum Guide November 2020 , Changes Between All Scrum Guides Versions And SAFe Agile

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Scrum Guide & SAFe Agile booklet

  1. 1. SCRUM GUIDE NOVEMBER 2020 & SCALED AGILE Changes Between Different Versions Of Scrum Guides MAY 20, 2021 SOUMYA DE INDIA
  2. 2. SCRUM GUIDE NOVEMBER 2020 KEN SCHWABER & JEFF SUTHERLAND
  3. 3. CHANGES BETWEEN DIFFERENT VERSIONS OF SCRUM GUIDES
  4. 4. Changes between 2017 and 2020 Scrum Guides Even Less Prescriptive Over the years, the Scrum Guide started getting a bit more prescriptive. The 2020 version aimed to bring Scrum back to being a minimally sufficient framework by removing or softening prescriptive language. e.g. removed Daily Scrum questions, soften language around PBI attributes, soften language around retro items in Sprint Backlog, shortened Sprint cancellation section, and more. One Team, Focused on One Product The goal was to eliminate the concept of a separate team within a team that has led to “proxy” or "us and them” behavior between the PO and Dev Team. There is now just one Scrum Team focused on the same objective, with three different sets of accountabilities: PO, SM, and Developers. Introduction of Product Goal The 2020 Scrum Guide introduces the concept of a Product Goal to provide focus for the Scrum Team toward a larger valuable objective. Each Sprint should bring the product closer to the overall Product Goal. A Home for Sprint Goal, Definition of Done, and Product Goal Previous Scrum Guides described Sprint Goal and Definition of Done without really giving them an identity. They were not quite artifacts but were somewhat attached to artifacts. With the addition of Product Goal, the 2020 version provides more clarity around this. Each of the three artifacts now contain ‘commitments’ to them. For the Product Backlog it is the Product Goal, the Sprint Backlog has the Sprint Goal, and the Increment has the Definition of Done (now without the quotes) . They exist to bring transparency and focus toward the progress of each artifact.
  5. 5. Self-Managing over Self-Organizing Previous Scrum Guides referred to Development Teams as self-organizing, choosing who and how to do work. With more of a focus on the Scrum Team, the 2020 version emphasizes a self-managing Scrum Team, choosing who, how, and what to work on. Three Sprint Planning Topics In addition to the Sprint Planning topics of “What” and “How”, the 2020 Scrum Guide places emphasis on a third topic, “Why”, referring to the Sprint Goal. Overall Simplification of Language for a Wider Audience The 2020 Scrum Guide has placed an emphasis on eliminating redundant and complex statements as well as removing any remaining inference to IT work (e.g. testing, system, design, requirement, etc). The Scrum Guide is now less than 13 pages.
  6. 6. Changes between 2016 and 2017 Scrum Guides Added section on the Uses of Scrum Scrum was initially developed for managing and developing products. Starting in the early 1990s, Scrum has been used extensively, worldwide, to:  Research and identify viable markets, technologies, and product capabilities;  Develop products and enhancements;  Release products and enhancements, as frequently as many times per day;  Develop and sustain Cloud (online, secure, on-demand) and other operational environments for product use; and,  Sustain and renew products. Scrum has been used to develop software, hardware, embedded software, networks of interacting function, autonomous vehicles, schools, government, marketing, managing the operation of organizations and almost everything we use in our daily lives, as individuals and societies. As technology, market, and environmental complexities and their interactions have rapidly increased, Scrum’s utility in dealing with complexity is proven daily. Scrum proved especially effective in iterative and incremental knowledge transfer. Scrum is now widely used for products, services, and the management of the parent organization. The essence of Scrum is a small team of people. The individual team is highly flexible and adaptive. These strengths continue operating in single, several, many, and networks of teams that develop, release, operate and sustain the work and work products of thousands of people. They collaborate and interoperate through sophisticated development architectures and target release environments. When the words “develop” and “development” are used in the Scrum Guide, they refer to complex work, such as those types identified above. Changed wording in The Scrum Master section to provide better clarity to the role. The text now reads: The Scrum Master is responsible for promoting and supporting Scrum as defined in the Scrum Guide. Scrum Masters do this by helping everyone understand Scrum theory, practices, rules, and values. The Scrum Master is a servant-leader for the Scrum Team. The Scrum Master helps those outside the Scrum Team understand which of their interactions with the Scrum
  7. 7. Team are helpful and which aren’t. The Scrum Master helps everyone change these interactions to maximize the value created by the Scrum Team. Added to the section Scrum Master Service to the Product Owner Ensuring that goals, scope, and product domain are understood by everyone on the Scrum Team as well as possible. Updated the first paragraph of the Daily Scrum section to read: The Daily Scrum is a 15-minute time-boxed event for the Development Team. The Daily Scrum is held every day of the Sprint. At it, the Development Team plans work for the next 24 hours. This optimizes team collaboration and performance by inspecting the work since the last Daily Scrum and forecasting upcoming Sprint work. The Daily Scrum is held at the same time and place each day to reduce complexity. Updated the Daily Scrum section to provide clarity on the goals of the Daily Scrum including this text: The structure of the meeting is set by the Development Team and can be conducted in different ways if it focuses on progress toward the Sprint Goal. Some Development Teams will use questions, some will be more discussion based. Here is an example of what might be used:  What did I do yesterday that helped the Development Team meet the Sprint Goal?  What will I do today to help the Development Team meet the Sprint Goal?  Do I see any impediment that prevents me or the Development Team from meeting the Sprint Goal? Added clarity around time-boxes Using the words “at most” to remove any questions that the time-box for Events means maximum length, but could be shorter.
  8. 8. Added to the Sprint Backlog section: To ensure continuous improvement, it includes at least one high priority way in which the team works, identified in the previous Retrospective meeting. Added clarity to the Increment section: An increment is a body of inspectable, "Done"" work that supports empiricism at the end of the Sprint. The increment is a step toward a vision or goal.
  9. 9. Changes between 2013 and 2016 Scrum Guides A section on Scrum Values. When the values of commitment, courage, focus, openness and respect are embodied and lived by the Scrum Team, the Scrum pillars of transparency, inspection, and adaptation come to life and build trust for everyone. The Scrum Team members learn and explore those values as they work with the Scrum events, roles and artifacts. Successful use of Scrum depends on people becoming more proficient in living these five values. People personally commit to achieving the goals of the Scrum Team. The Scrum Team members have courage to do the right thing and work on tough problems. Everyone focuses on the work of the Sprint and the goals of the Scrum Team. The Scrum Team and its stakeholders agree to be open about all the work and the challenges with performing the work. Scrum Team members respect each other to be capable, independent people.
  10. 10. Changes between 2011 and 2013 Scrum Guides A section on Artifact Transparency has been added. Scrum relies on transparency. Decisions to optimize value and control risk are made based on the perceived state of the artifacts. To the extent that transparency is complete, these decisions have a sound basis. To the extent that the artifacts are incompletely transparent, these decisions can be flawed, value may diminish and risk may increase. Sprint Planning is now one event. Two topics are addressed in it: What can be done this Sprint, and How will the chosen work be done. After the Development Team forecasts the Product Backlog items for the Sprint, the Scrum Team crafts a Sprint Goal. The Sprint Goal creates coherence in the Development Team’s work that would not be present in separate initiatives without a common goal. Note the formal inclusion of a Sprint Goal. The Product Backlog is refined rather than groomed. The refined Product Backlog items are transparent, well enough understood and granular enough to be input for the Sprint Planning and for selection for the Sprint. Product Backlog items with this transparency are called “Ready.” Ready and Done are two states that reinforce transparency. Scrum prescribes its events to create regularity and to minimize the need for meetings not defined in Scrum. All events are time-boxed events, such that every event has a maximum duration. A Sprint, as container event, has a fixed duration that cannot be shortened or lengthened. The remaining events may end whenever the purpose of the event is achieved; ensuring an appropriate amount of time is spent without allowing waste in the process. The importance of the Daily Scrum as a planning event is reinforced. Too often it is seen as a status event. Every day, the Development Team should understand how it intends to work together as a self-organizing team to accomplish the Sprint Goal and create the anticipated Increment by the end of the Sprint. The input to the meeting should be how the team is doing toward meeting the Sprint Goal; the output should be a new or revised plan that optimizes the team’s efforts in meeting the Sprint Goal. To that end, the three questions have been reformulated to emphasize the team over the individual:  What did I do yesterday that helped the Development Team meet the Sprint  What will I do today to help the Development Team meet the Sprint Goal?
  11. 11.  Do I see any impediment that prevents me or the Development Team from meeting the Sprint Goal? The concept of value is reinforced to use in the Sprint Review. During the Sprint Review, the Scrum Team and stakeholders collaborate about what was done in the Sprint. Based on that and any changes to the Product Backlog during the Sprint, attendees collaborate on the next things that could be done to optimize value.
  12. 12. Changes between 2010 and 2011 Scrum Guides Development Teams do not commit to completing the work planned during a Sprint Planning Meeting. The Development Team creates a forecast of work it believes will be done, but that forecast will change as more becomes known throughout the Sprint. Scrum does not mandate a burn-down chart to monitor progress. Scrum requires only that:  Remaining work for a Sprint is summed and known on a daily basis.  Trending toward completing the work of the Sprint is maintained throughout the Sprint. Release Planning is a valuable thing to do when using Scrum, but isn’t required by Scrum itself. The Sprint Backlog is the Product Backlog items selected for the Sprint, plus a plan for delivering them. There is no longer a required concept of "Sprint Backlog items" although that technique can make a great plan. A self-organizing Development Team always has a plan. The Product Backlog is "ordered," instead of "prioritized," providing flexibility to the Product Owner to optimize value in his or her unique circumstances. Added the practice of Product Backlog Grooming. Removal of many tips, optional practices and techniques. The team of people performing the work of creating an Increment is the Development Team. Regardless of the work performed by individual team members, they are known as Developers. Removed the reference to chickens and pigs. Removed reference to undone work.
  13. 13. Additional Notes:
  14. 14. SAFE 5 FOR LEAN ENTERPRISES
  15. 15. SAFe 5 for Lean Enterprises SAFe for Lean Enterprises is the world’s leading framework for business agility. SAFe integrates the power of Lean, Agile, and DevOps into a comprehensive operating system that helps enterprises thrive in the digital age by delivering innovative products and services faster, more predictably, and with higher quality. Configurable and scalable, SAFe allows each organization to adapt the framework to its own business needs. With four out-of-the-box configurations, SAFe supports the full spectrum of solutions, from those requiring a small number of teams to those complex systems that require hundreds—and even thousands—of people to build and deliver. Business Benefits of SAFe Surviving in the age of digital is not guaranteed. Business agility isn’t an option; it’s imperative. Even businesses that don’t consider themselves Information Technology (IT) or software companies—professional services, financial services, manufacturers, healthcare institutions, defense contractors, government agencies, and more—are now all highly dependent on their ability to rapidly produce new, high-quality, innovative, digitally-enabled products and services. The mission of Scaled Agile, Inc. (SAI), the provider of SAFe, is to help enterprises grow their business through the Framework’s knowledge base. SAI also offers certification, training, courseware, community resources, and a global network of more than 400 service, tooling, and Global service partners.
  16. 16. Improves Business Outcomes Created from over a decade of field experience, SAFe draws from four primary bodies of knowledge: Agile development, systems thinking, Lean product development, and DevOps. It helps enterprises answer the following types of questions:  How do we align technology development to strategic business goals?  How do we deliver new value on a predictable schedule so the business can plan? How do we improve the quality of our solutions and delight our customers?  How do we scale Agile practices from teams to ARTs and across value streams and the enterprise to deliver better results?  How do we organize people around value so that our programs deliver effectively and avoid the delays inherent in a traditional, functional structure?  How do we create an environment that fosters collaboration, innovation, and relentless improvement for our people? How can we change our culture so that it is safe to fail?  How do we encourage people to take risks, think creatively, and embrace continuous learning?  How can we help our teams improve without getting in the way? By adopting SAFe—and applying its well-described set of values, principles, and practices—the enterprise can address these questions and realize more significant business and individual benefits. SAFe 5 enables business agility and improving business outcomes for organizations of all sizes across the world. SAFe has produced dramatic improvements in time to market, employee engagement, higher quality, higher customer satisfaction, and overall improved economic outcomes. It also helps create cultures that are more productive, rewarding, and fun. Figure 1 highlights these benefits as derived directly from Case Studies written by SAFe customers.
  17. 17. “We had multiple waterfall efforts, third-party integration, and a hard, regulatory mandate that made coordination and execution exceptionally difficult. SAFe provided the agility, visibility, and transparency needed to ensure we could integrate with the numerous other efforts, get predictable in our delivery, and ensure timelines are met.” — David McMunn, the Director of Fannie Mae’s Agile Center of Excellence (COE) SAFe Evolves Continuously A hallmark of SAFe is that it stays current with new and evolving business and technology trends. Our incremental delivery model enables enterprises to adapt more quickly and stay ahead of the competition by leveraging the latest knowledge in SAFe. For example, COVID-19 forced many organizations to change how Agile teams and ARTs collaborate. In response, the guidance for PI Planning, Organizational Agility, and Agile Teams were quickly updated. Most updates to SAFe simply require changes to various articles and new advanced topics. Sometimes, however, updates to the Big Picture (BP) are needed for emphasis and to provide ready access to the latest content. Minor releases of the BP occur under a ‘dot release” like the current BP version 5.1. Such minor releases are truly incremental and do not require upgrades to training and certification.
  18. 18. Over time, the incremental advances and significant new knowledge drive the release of a new version, as was the case with SAFe 5—which extended SAFe into true business agility. In these cases, SAFe practitioners and SPCs must keep pace with upgraded knowledge, training, and certification. To help our community keep current with the latest guidance, we’ve introduced a new feature that provides a log of meaningful incremental changes on the home page under the heading, ‘What’s New in SAFe.’ When you click on a change item, it will open a blog post to inform our readers of the ‘why’ and ‘what’ for the changes. Introduction to SAFe 5.1 Big Picture The SAFe Framework website features an interactive ‘Big Picture’ graphic. It provides a visual model of the Framework and is the primary user interface to the knowledgebase. Each icon of the image is clickable and offers access to extensive SAFe guidance. The configurations support a full range of development and business environments and the foundational principles, values, mindset, roles, artifacts, and implementation elements that make up the SAFe framework. The main components of the SAFe framework are described in the following sections. Figure 2: Full SAFe WithhConfiguration Tabs
  19. 19. Figure 2: Full SAFe WithhConfiguration Tabs
  20. 20. Overview SAFe 5 includes an overview tab shown in Figure 3. This graphic provides a simplified view of SAFe’s Seven Core Competencies of the Lean Enterprise and their twenty-one dimensions that enable business agility. Lean-Agile Leadership remains at the foundation. The customer is prominently featured at the center as the focal point for all the competencies. Measure and Grow at the top right is a reminder of periodic assessments needed to track the organization’s progress towards the principles and practices that enable business agility. This overview is a useful tool for providing an initial orientation to SAFe, introducing the business agility assessment, and framing executive briefings. Figure 3: The SAFe Overview
  21. 21. Figure 3: The SAFe Overvieww
  22. 22. Seven Core Competencies of the Lean Enterprise SAFe 5 is built around the Seven Core Competencies of the Lean Enterprise. These competencies include major re-writes to the original five competencies introduced in SAFe 4.6, along with two entirely new competencies (Organizational Agility and Continuous Learning Culture). The competencies are the primary lens for understanding and implementing SAFe, as illustrated in the Overview tab on the Big Picture. Each of the following competencies offers the knowledge, skills, and behaviors, enabling enterprises to achieve business agility: The Lean-Agile Leadership competency describes how Lean-Agile Leaders drive and sustain organizational change by empowering individuals and teams to reach their highest potential. They do this by leading by example, adopting a Lean-Agile mindset, and leading the change to new ways of working. The result is more engaged employees, increased productivity and innovation, and successful organizational change. The Continuous Learning Culture competency describes a set of values and practices that encourage individuals and the enterprise to increase knowledge, competence, performance, and innovation continually. Organizations become a learning organization by committing to relentless improvement and promoting a culture of innovation. The Team and Technical Agility competency describes the critical skills and Lean- Agile principles and practices that high-performing Agile teams and Teams of Agile teams use to create high-quality solutions for their customers. The result is increased productivity, better quality, faster time-to-market, and predictable delivery of value. The Agile Product Delivery competency is a customer-centric approach to defining, building, and releasing a continuous flow of valuable products and services to customers and users. This competency enables the organization to provide solutions that delight customers, lower development costs, reduce risk, and outmaneuver the competition.
  23. 23. The Enterprise Solution Delivery competency describes how to apply Lean-Agile principles and practices to the specification, development, deployment, operation, and evolution of the world’s largest and most sophisticated software applications, networks, and cyber-physical systems. The Lean Portfolio Management competency aligns strategy and execution by applying Lean and systems thinking approaches to strategy and investment funding, Agile portfolio operations, and governance. These collaborations give the enterprise the ability to align strategy to execution, meet existing commitments reliably, and enable innovation. The Organizational Agility competency describes how Lean-thinking people and Agile teams optimize their business processes, evolve strategy with clear and decisive new commitments, and quickly adapt the organization as needed to capitalize on new opportunities. SAFe 5 continues to expand guidance for Lean-Agile adoption in Government. Based on the foundation and principles of SAFe, the guidance emphasizes:  Building on a solid foundation of Lean-Agile values, principles, and practice  Creating high performing teams of government teams and contractor personnel  Aligning technology investments with agency strategy  Transitioning from projects to a Lean flow of epics  Adopting Lean budgeting aligned to value streams  Applying Lean estimating and forecasting on cadence  Modifying acquisition practices to enable Lean-Agile development and operations  Building in quality and compliance  Adapting governance practices to support agility and Lean flow of value The government article is a unique element within the Framework. It’s a portal to a series of articles on SAFe adoption in the public sector, providing links to Agile government resources, videos, and events. Many of them are hard to find, and some are available only through our government portal. Our portal is a small way SAI gives back to the thousands of dedicated civil servants and their industry partners working tirelessly to bring agility to government.
  24. 24. SAFe Configurations SAFe supports the full range of development environments with four out-of-the- box configurations. The configurations can be accessed using the tabs shown in Figure 1. Each is described in the following sections. Essential SAFe The Essential SAFe configuration is the basic building block for all SAFe configurations and is the simplest starting point for implementation. This competency builds on the principles and practices found in the Lean-Agile Leadership, Team and Technical Agility, and the Agile Product Delivery competencies. SAFe is anchored by an organizational structure called the Agile Release Train (ART), where Agile teams and key stakeholders are dedicated to a meaningful, ongoing solution mission. Essential SAFe includes both the Agile team and ART constructs, as shown in Figure 4. Figure ϰ : Essential SAFe Configuration
  25. 25. Figure 4 : Essential SAFe Configuration
  26. 26. Large Solution SAFe The Large Solution SAFe configuration introduces the Enterprise Solution Delivery competency, which supports those building the largest and most complex solutions that require multiple ARTs and Suppliers but do not require portfolio-level considerations. Such solution development is typical for aerospace and defense, automotive, and government industries, where the large solution—not portfolio governance—is the primary concern. The Solution Train organizational construct helps enterprises with the biggest challenges—building large-scale, multidisciplinary software, hardware, cyber- physical, and complex IT systems. Developing these solutions requires additional roles, artifacts, events, and coordination, as Figure 5 illustrates. Figure 5 :(Large Solution SAFe Configuration
  27. 27. Figure 5 : Large Solution SAFe Configuration
  28. 28. Portfolio SAFe The Portfolio SAFe configuration is the minimum set of competencies and practices that can fully enable business agility, as indicated by the blue ‘Business Agility’ bar at the top. This bar also includes a link to Measure & Grow for guidance on conducting SAFe business agility assessments. Portfolio SAFe provides two additional competencies, Organizational Agility and Lean Portfolio Management, beyond the three core competencies of Essential SAFe. Lean Portfolio Management aligns portfolio execution to enterprise strategy and organizes development around the flow of value through one or more value streams. Organization Agility extends Lean thinking and practice throughout the enterprise and enables strategy agility. Continuous Learning Culture describes how everyone in the organization learns together, relentlessly improves, and builds innovation into the culture. In addition to the competencies, Portfolio SAFe provides principles and practices for portfolio strategy and investment funding, Agile portfolio operations, and Lean governance. Figure 6 : (Portfolio SAFe Configuration
  29. 29. Figure 6 : Portfolio SAFe Configuration
  30. 30. Full SAFe Full SAFe is the most comprehensive configuration, including all seven core competencies needed for business agility. It is typically used by the world’s largest enterprises to maintain portfolios of large and complex solutions. In some cases, multiple instances of various SAFe configurations may be required. Spanning Palette The Spanning Palette contains various roles and artifacts that may apply to a specific team, program, large solution, or portfolio context. An essential element of SAFe’s flexibility and adaptability, the spanning palette contains additional guidance elements that can be used in specific contexts. Figure 8 illustrates two versions of the spanning palette. The leftmost figure is used by the Essential SAFe configuration, while the rightmost one serves all other configurations. However, since SAFe is a framework, enterprises can apply any item from the larger spanning palette to Essential SAFe. Figure 2: Full SAFe WithhConfiguration Tabs
  31. 31. Below is a brief description of each spanning palette element:  Vision – The vision describes a future view of the solution to be developed, reflecting customer and stakeholder needs and the Features and Capabilities proposed to address those needs.  Roadmap – The roadmap communicates planned ART and value stream deliverables and milestones over a timeline.  Milestones – Milestones are used to define important events on a roadmap. SAFe describes fixed-date, Program Increment (PI), and learning milestones.  Shared Services – Represents the specialty roles necessary for an ART or Solution Train’s success but cannot be dedicated full time to any specific train.  Community of Practice (CoP) – A community of practice is an informal group of team members and other experts, acting within the context of a program or enterprise, that has a mission of sharing practical knowledge in one or more relevant domains.  System Team – The system team is a special Agile team that provides assistance in building and using the continuous delivery pipeline, and where necessary, validating full end-to-end system performance.  Lean User Experience (UX) – Lean UX brings Lean principles to user experience design. It uses an iterative, hypothesis-driven approach to product development through constant measurement and learning loops (build-measure- learn).  Metrics – The primary measure in SAFe is the objective measurement of working solutions. In addition, however, SAFe defines additional intermediate and long-term metrics that teams, ARTs, and portfolios can use to measure progress.
  32. 32. Foundation The Foundation contains the supporting principles, values, mindset, implementation guidance, and leadership roles needed to deliver value successfully at scale. Each foundation element illustrated in Figure 9 is briefly described next.  Lean-Agile Leaders – Management has the ultimate responsibility for business outcomes. Leaders are trained in SAFe and become trainers of these leaner and more agile ways of thinking and working. To this end, SAFe describes a new leadership style exhibited by the enterprise’s new ‘Lean- thinking manager-teachers’.  Core Values – Four core values of Alignment, Built-In Quality, Transparency, and Program Execution define the belief and value system for SAFe.  Lean-Agile Mindset – The Lean-Agile Mindset is the combination of beliefs, assumptions, attitudes, and actions of SAFe leaders and practitioners who embrace the concepts of the Agile Manifesto and Lean thinking. It’s the personal, intellectual, and leadership foundation for adopting and applying SAFe principles and practices.  SAFe Principles – SAFe practices are grounded in ten principles that synthesize Agile methods, Lean product development, DevOps, and systems thinking, coupled with decades of practical field experience.  Implementation Roadmap – Implementing the changes necessary to become a Lean-Agile technology enterprise is a substantial change for most companies. SAFe provides an implementation roadmap to help guide organizations on this journey.  SPCs – SAFe Program Consultant (SPCs) are change agents who combine their technical knowledge of SAFe with an intrinsic motivation to improve their company’s software and systems development processes. Learn More Knaster, Richard, and Dean Leffingwell. SAFe 5.0 Distilled: Achieving Business Agility with the Scaled Agile Framework. Addison-Wesley.
  33. 33. 1 WHAT’S NEW IN SAFE 5? Evolving the Scaled Agile Framework
  34. 34. © Scaled Agile. Inc. © Scaled Agile, Inc. Evolving the Scaled Agile Framework What’s New in SAFe ® 5?
  35. 35. © Scaled Agile. Inc. SAFe: Roots, past, present, and future 2 2011 Field experience at Enterprise scale Now… Lean product development  |  Agile development  |  DevOps  |  Systems thinking
  36. 36. © Scaled Agile. Inc. 3 SAFe ® 5 for Lean Enterprises is the world’s leading framework for business agility. SAFe integrates the power of Lean, Agile, and DevOps into a comprehensive system that helps enterprises thrive in the digital age by delivering innovative products and services faster, more predictably, and with higher quality.
  37. 37. © Scaled Agile. Inc. © Scaled Agile, Inc. SAFe Big Picture 5.1 4
  38. 38. © Scaled Agile. Inc. 5
  39. 39. © Scaled Agile. Inc. 6 New Operational Value Streams icon Renamed Development Value Streams Value Streams
  40. 40. © Scaled Agile. Inc. 7 Solution boxes at the end of the Development Value Streams Participatory Budgeting added to Lean Budgets Portfolio Level
  41. 41. © Scaled Agile. Inc. 8 DevOps & Continuous Delivery Pipeline Improved Continuous Delivery Pipeline (CDP) visualization Release boxes positioned throughout the PI CDP ‘infinity loops’ repeated in the iterations
  42. 42. © Scaled Agile. Inc. 9 Teams and the work Extended guidance for Business | Technology Replaced the current Solution icon with the Design Thinking representation
  43. 43. © Scaled Agile. Inc. Diminishing the ‘Program’ term Abbreviated SAFe Program Consultant as SPC Abbreviate Program Increment as PI De-emphasize the PI boundary to avoid misinterpretation 10
  44. 44. © Scaled Agile. Inc. © Scaled Agile, Inc. Significant Article Updates 11
  45. 45. © Scaled Agile. Inc. Operational Value Stream types Fulfillment operational Value Stream for a consumer loan Manufacturing operational Value Stream for a vehicle Loan repayment with interest Eligibility decision and underwriting Complete loan application Quick rate quote Attract customer Extend loan terms Setup payment terms Award loan Repay money Close loan Loan need Manufacture subassemblies Order received Manage inventory Procure materials Assemble final product Validate product Package and ship Prep financials Engage auditors Conduct the audit Address issues Revise financials Audit letter Board signoff Supporting operational Value Stream for annual audit Annual audit requirement Audited financials Contracts and licensing Sales cycle Create interest Provisioning Customer care Renewals Order received Software product operational Value Stream Software product Vehicle
  46. 46. © Scaled Agile. Inc. Development Value Streams patterns 13
  47. 47. © Scaled Agile. Inc. Teams on the ART are organized for flow Stream-aligned team – organized around the flow of work and has the ability to deliver value directly to the Customer or end user. Complicated subsystem team – organized around specific subsystems that require deep specialty skills and expertise. Platform team – organized around the development and support of platforms that provide services to other teams. Enabling team – organized to assist other teams with specialized capabilities and help them become proficient in new technologies. More information in the Advanced Topic Article, Organizing Agile Teams and ARTs: Team Topologies at Scale
  48. 48. © Scaled Agile. Inc. ► Stream-aligned (best) – By product, Solution, or service – By Customer or market segment – By Solution feature areas – By value streamlets – New product innovation Organizing ARTs with ART Topologies in a Solution Train 15 ► Complicated Subsystem – Highly specialised system components – Safety critical systems elements – Specialty algorithm or business rules – Part of a cyber-physical system ► Platform – Sets of services consumed by other ARTs
  49. 49. 16 © Scaled Agile, Inc. Participatory budgeting overview Business Context Total Portfolio Budget and Guardrails Run the Business (RtB) Solution Investments Grow the Business (GtB) Epics Investments Participatory Budgeting Forums New Value Stream Budgets Current Value Stream Budgets Baseline Solution Investments Proposed Solution Initiatives
  50. 50. 17 © Scaled Agile, Inc. Participatory budgeting is a significant event that requires preparation, coordination, and communication. Running a participatory budgeting event Prepare the content Assemble the participants Conduct the forums Analyze results 1 2 3 4 System/Solution Architects Business Owners Product/Solution Management Epic Owners Business Context Run the Business (RtB) Solution Investments Grow the Business (GtB) Epic Investments Baseline Solution Investments Proposed Solution Initiatives Total Portfolio Budget and Guardrails
  51. 51. © Scaled Agile. Inc. Dev(Sec)Ops landing page 18
  52. 52. © Scaled Agile. Inc. Business and Technology landing page 19 New landing page for domain-specific Agile team guidance Technology • Hardware (new article) • Software (summarize existing SAFe guidance) Business • Agile HR (existing whitepaper) • Agile Marketing (existing whitepaper) • Agile Contracts (existing whitepaper) • more to follow…
  53. 53. © Scaled Agile. Inc. © Scaled Agile, Inc. 5.1 Courseware and Toolkits 20
  54. 54. © Scaled Agile. Inc. Lean Portfolio Management Updated 5.1 Courses 21 Leading SAFe ® Implementing SAFe ® SAFe ® for Teams ► All four courses updated and enhanced with new SAFe 5.1 big picture images and content ► New style guide incorporated across the courses ► Introduced ‘Topic & Learning Objectives’ structure to improve flow and learner outcomes ► Numerous improvements and fixes including remote guidance and course timings ► New Course Delivery Enablement (CDE) videos for Leading SAFe and SAFe for Teams
  55. 55. © Scaled Agile. Inc. Updated 5.1 Toolkits 22 ► All five toolkits updated with the latest SAFe 5.1 big picture images and content ► Incorporated the latest guidance on value streams and ARTs into the VSAIW toolkit ► Brand new Team Formation Toolkit (out now) Introducing SAFe SAFe ® Value Stream and ART Identification Workshop SAFe Executive Workshop Team Formation Toolkit SAFe LPM Execution Toolkit
  56. 56. © Scaled Agile. Inc. © Scaled Agile, Inc. 23 Thank You
  57. 57. 1 SAFE CONFIGURATIONS & POSTERS
  58. 58. FULL SAFE
  59. 59. PORTFOLIO SAFE
  60. 60. LARGE SOLUTION SAFE
  61. 61. ESSENTIAL SAFE
  62. 62. SAFE OVERVIEW
  63. 63. IMPLEMENTATION ROADMAP OF SCALED AGILE
  64. 64. SAFe ® Scrum Master SAFe ® for Teams SAFe ® Product Owner/ Product Manager Leading SAFe ® (for ART stakeholders) Implementing SAFe ® (more SPCs) SAFe ® Advanced Scrum Master SAFe ® Release Train Engineer SAFe ® DevOps Agile Software Engineering Leading SAFe ® Lean Portfolio Management Lean Portfolio Management Implementing SAFe ® (Reach the tipping point) Leading SAFe ® SAFe ® for Government SAFe ® for Architects PI Planning Lean-Agile Center of Excellence Go SAFe C r e a t e the Implementation P l a n C o a c h A R T E x e c u t i o n Train Executives, Managers, and Leaders Identify Value Streams and ARTs Prepare for ART Launch Launch More ARTs and Value Streams Extend to the Portfolio Accelerate Train Teams and Launch ART Train Lean-Agile Change Agents Waterfall/ Ad hoc Agile Business results 10 – 50% 30 – 75% 20 – 50% 25 – 75% Quality P r o d u c t i v i t y E n g a g e m e n t T i m e - t o - M a r k e t Measure & Grow SAFe Implementation Roadmap ® Agile Product Management
  65. 65. SAFE POSTER
  66. 66. • Generative culture • People do all the work • Your customer is whoever consumes your work • Build long-term partnerships based on trust • To change the culture you have to change the organization • Management applies and teaches lean thinking, bases decisions on this long-term philosophy • Principles of Lean-Agile Leadership • Sustainable shortest lead time • Best quality and value to people and society • High morale, safety, customer delight • Optimize sustainable value delivery • Build in quality • Understand, exploit, and manage variability • Move from projects to products • Innovative people • Time and space for innovation • Go See • Experimentation and feedback • Pivot without mercy or guilt • Innovation riptides • Constant sense of danger • Optimize the whole • Problem solving culture Ř5HŴHFWDWNH milestones • Base improvements on facts
  67. 67. © Scaled Agile, Inc. All rights reserved #1 - Take an economic view #2 - Apply systems thinking #3 - Assume variability; preserve options #4 - Build incrementally with fast, integrated learning cycles #5 - Base milestones on objective evaluation of working systems #6 - Visualize and limit WIP, reduce batch sizes, and manage queue lengths #7 - Apply cadence, synchronize with cross-domain planning #8 - UnOock the intrinsic motivation of knowledge workers #9 - Decentralize decision-making #10 - Organize around value SAFe is based on ten immutable, underlying Lean and Agile principles.
  68. 68. Individuals and interactions over processes and tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer’s competitive advantage. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale. Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done. 7KHPRVWHIƓFLHQWDQGHIIHFWLYHPHWKRGRIFRQYHLQJ information to and within a development team is face–to–face conversation. Working software is the primary measure of progress. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to PDLQWDLQDFRQVWDQWSDFHLQGHƓQLWHO Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility. Simplicity—the art of maximizing the amount of work not done—is essential. The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams. $WUHJXODULQWHUYDOVWKHWHDPUHŴHFWVRQKRZWR become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly. Agile Manifesto Principles Values agilemanifesto.org 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  69. 69. S.No. Topic Data Source 1 Scrum Guide November 2020 https://scrumguides.org/index.html 2 Changes Between Different Versions Of Scrum Guides https://scrumguides.org/revisions.html 3 SAFe 5 For Lean Enterprises https://www.scaledagileframework.com/safe-for- lean-enterprises/

Scrum Guide November 2020 , Changes Between All Scrum Guides Versions And SAFe Agile

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