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IoT and the Supply Chain

IoT and the Supply Chain

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IoT and the Supply Chain

  1. 1. NATIONAL TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS NTUA IOTWeek2014-Workshop“IoTforManufacturingEnterprises: FP7achievementsandH2020challenges” London,UK Dr. Sotiris Koussouris skous@me.com @skous DSSLab - NTUA 18/06/2014 1
  2. 2. • A DMN is a temporal or permanent coalition, comprising production systems of geographically dispersed SMEs and/or OEMs that collaborate in a shared value-chain to conduct joint manufacturing. 2 Each member of the DMN produces one or more product components that can be assembled into final service-enhanced products under control of a joint production schedule. Production schedules are monitored collectively, while products are composed and (re-) configured on demand through dynamic and usually ad-hoc inter- organisational collaborations that can cope with evolving requirements and emergent behaviour. http://www.imagine-futurefactory.eu
  3. 3. 3 IoT IoT IoT Introduction of IoT IoT IoT IoT
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  7. 7. • Manufacturing • Shop Floor Controllers - Automators • Machine Sensors • Environmental Sensors • Assembly Line • RFIDs • Logistics • RFID • Location Sensors • Temperature Sensors • NFC 7
  8. 8. Many technologies are here, but combined usage is still behind • Shift away for pure experimentation and deploy networks of IoTs - Interoperability is still an issue! • Real-Time processing of manufacturing (IoT) data, complementing with patterns from historical logs • Make products and components smart themselves! • Cognisant IoT - Smart Devices having multi objective targets or/and talking to each other and collaborate towards common, factory goals (e.g. lower room temperature but also care for energy efficiency) Other issues include: • Data Confidentiality and Security • IPRs 8
  9. 9. 9 https://www.flickr.com/photos/12596/ Power to the people ! By Shoppers_on_Dundas,_near_Yonge.jpg: Ian Muttoo derivative work: Pbsouthwood Workers Consumers
  10. 10. Access to Information published through IoT on their: • Mobile Phones • Tablets • Phablets • Computers 10
  11. 11. Wearables offer: • Personalised BI & Analytics • Notifications • Improves Sensing (for machines) • Safety Instructions • Quick Information/Knowledge exchang • Biosensing Placing Human Intelligence where it’s needed, when it’s needed 11
  12. 12. • World Population: 7.17 bn • Internet Users: 2.4 bn Social Media could serve manufacturing for: • Identification/Improved Prediction of latent consumer needs • Detection of Real-Time Market Opportunities • Mining Trends and Public Opinions on Products/Services • ... but also as an IoT platform supporting also a more user-friendly way (Twitter's thoughts of becoming the core IoT platform...) 12 SocialMedia Today Infographic
  13. 13. • Sensors are usually deployed as Sensor Grids BUT Communication between grids is not addressed as needed • The Cloud can be seen as a controller of and resource provider for IoT • Manufacturing Software moving to the Cloud? Happening right now! • Some offerings: • Sensor as a Service • Sensor Processing as a Service • Social Sensors for "crowdsourcing" intelligence • Manufacturing leveraging at the same time IoT and the Cloud may: • Improve Interoperability between entities • Realise the vision of a fully connected and monitored Supply Chain • Conduct Effort Intense operations (analytics, etc.) • Offer Innovative Business Models such as Pay as you Go, Leasing, etc. • Combine data and information from external sources 13
  14. 14. NATIONAL TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS NTUA IOTWeek2014-Workshop“IoTforManufacturingEnterprises: FP7achievementsandH2020challenges” London,UK Dr. Sotiris Koussouris skous@me.com @skous DSSLab - NTUA 18/06/2014 14

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