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WashingtonStateVisitors’guide2014
Best of the
northwest
www.experiencewa.com
discover
howtoget
onthewater
explore
where to...
TO GET YOUR VIP PASSPORT TO SAVINGS:
(877) 885-9452 • seattlesouthside.com
Make yourself at home away from home. Firmly es...
THE MOST PLANES
IN THE CLOUD.
MORE WI-FI THAN
ANY OTHER AIRLINE.
DELTA.COM/WIFI
SEE OUR STUNNING VARIETY of over 200 sophisticated retail stores where you will find the
best-known brands and unique gift...
Whether you’re visiting wine country in the
Tri-Cities, soaring above Seattle atop the
Space Needle or enjoying Spokane’s
...
®
1519 Pike Place Market, Seattle
206-622-2036 • www.eatatlowells.com
Lowell’s opens every day of the week for breakfast, lu...
8 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM
Contents
FEATURES
30The Wild Waters
of Washington
Rollicking ...
Please call us at 425-284-5900 or visit heathmankirkland.com • 220 Kirkland Avenue, Downtown Kirkland, Washington
the heat...
10 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM
4 1
2
7
9
10
8
3
5
6
99
PHOTOGRAPHSFROMTOP:LINDSAYBORDEN,JOH...
12 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM
PHOTOGRAPHSFROMLEFT:TUSHARKOLEY/SHUTTERSTOCK,JEFFCAVEN,2009F...
www.portseattle.org
Cruise Seattle
2014
Start your Alaska Cruise here!
wanderlusts k i a r e a s 16 / r e g i o n a l s i p s 17 / lo c a l g o o d s 1 8 / l i t e r a ry s i t e s 2 0 / n at i...
wanderlust
16 Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014 www.experiencewa.com
North
1 Mt. Baker
The mountain that holds
the wor...
www.experiencewa.com Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014 17
Sip the State
hen it comes to beverages, we’re lucky. Climat...
wanderlust
discoveries
Made Here
From the rolling hills of the Palouse
to the coastal sea stacks of the Olympic
Peninsula,...
- NEWCASTLE,WA -
•	 Experience two championship-caliber
18-hole golf courses, co-designed by
Robert E. Cupp and Fred Coupl...
wanderlust
Book It
ome to a slew of literary locales, Washington has
served as muse for many a best-selling author.
The st...
Just 30 minutes
north of Seattle,
Woodinville Wine Country
is home to over
100 award-winning
wineries and tasting rooms.
wanderlust
Hibulb Cultural Center
On a 50-acre natural history
preserve, this Tulalip (map
p. 48) tribute features histori...
greatwolf.com/grandmound | 800.640.9653 (WOLF)
Visit bestwesternWashington.com/bwr for complete terms and conditions. All ...
24 Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014 www.experiencewa.com
wanderlust
Get romantic
Stateof Love
From sweethearts steali...
Calendar
26 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM
22	 Mystery Weekend
(Langley) Take part in an
inter...
Lynnwood Tourism
Washington State Visitors Guide Ad
1/6 Page Vertical - 2.1875”x 4.75”- Full Color
1/2014
www.LynnwoodTour...
PHOTOGRAPHBYJOEVIESTI/VIESTIPHOTO.COM
28 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM
20	 Summer Solstice Ar...
August 22, 23 & 24, 2014
Fri. Noon-7 • Sat. 10-7 • Sun. 10-5
EXIT 81
EXIT 79
GARLIC
FEST
NATIONALAVE
FREE
Parking!
$5 Gene...
30 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM
of Was
TheWild
Waters
WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 31
WESTHAVEN STATE PARK
shingtonBy ANNE LARKIN Photograph by JU...
32 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM
“PADDLE, PADDLE!”
I hear hollered from behind me for what
mu...
WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 33
isthmus of sand jutting
into Puget Sound.
WHITE-WATER THE
VO...
34 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM
PHOTOGRAPHSCOURTESYDAKOTACOLUMBIAHOUSEBOATADVENTURES
downstr...
36 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM
PHOTOGRAPHLEFTBYMICHAELHANSON,RIGHTBYCOLUMBIARIVERKEEPER
the...
Romance, Culture,
Entertainment,
and Recreation
Experience
this waterfront jewel
of the Kitsap Peninsula
situated on the s...
SASQUATCH!
MUSIC FESTIVAL
2013 AT THE GORGE
AMPHITHEATRE IN
GEORGE, WA
38 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERI...
WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 39
FEST
BY
NORTH
WEST
Catch a set by
the next Nirvana
or Jimi H...
40 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM
The circumstances vary—be it a cold beer
with your favorite ...
WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 41
KING GORGE
Sasquatch! Music Festival
May 23–25, July 4–6; th...
42 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM
door Music Festival (July 24–26) launched
last summer, drawi...
44 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM
Brandi Carlile. Look, don’t
touch. June–Aug; Woodland
Park Z...
Must See-Must Do
Washington Tours & Attractions
CANOPY TOURS NORTHWEST Our
tour features 6 ziplines, two beautiful
trails,...
visitseattle.org
photo:NickHall
Come discover what makes Seattle great.
Metro SeattleSEATTLE, TACOMA, AND PUGET SOUND
PHOTOGRAPHBYARTAZUMANDIRIANASHIYAN/SHUTTERSTOCK
WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHING...
GLACIER
PEAK
48 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM
Everett
Mukilteo
Marysville
North Bend
Snoqualm...
WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 49
ART MEETS NATURE
REGIONAL TASTES
Art & Craft
The South Sound...
50 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM
LOCAL SIPS
Pour Across
the Sound
The Seattle area may be bes...
WE
CONNECT
ART
TO LIFE
visitsam.org
Photo: Catherine Anstett
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I...
52 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM
CHIHULY BRIDGE OF GLASS
AND MUSEUM OF GLASS
OLD CAPITOL
BUIL...
Refresh
V I S I T B E L L E V U E W A S H I N G T O N . CO M
There’s an abundance of
refreshing ways to experience
Bellevu...
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Washington Visitor Guide

  1. 1. WashingtonStateVisitors’guide2014 Best of the northwest www.experiencewa.com discover howtoget onthewater explore where to rock ’n’ roll taste what to drink now 63awesomefestivals 2014 Washingtonstate visitors’ Guide
  2. 2. TO GET YOUR VIP PASSPORT TO SAVINGS: (877) 885-9452 • seattlesouthside.com Make yourself at home away from home. Firmly established as one of the Northwest’s premier destinations for the value-minded traveler, Seattle Southside has all of the comforts of home just a stone’s throw away from everything Pacific Northwest. Every adventure needs a home base. Make Seattle Southside yours! 1) Cut out this exclusive voucher from Seattle Southside. 2) Bring your voucher to the Seattle Southside Visitor Center at Westfield Southcenter. 3) Receive your VIP Passport to Savings, entitling you to thousands of dollars worth of special offers & amenities from more than 50 retailers, restaurants & cafes.
  3. 3. THE MOST PLANES IN THE CLOUD. MORE WI-FI THAN ANY OTHER AIRLINE. DELTA.COM/WIFI
  4. 4. SEE OUR STUNNING VARIETY of over 200 sophisticated retail stores where you will find the best-known brands and unique gifts. Plus 25 destination dining options, numerous café-style choices and an array of dynamic entertainment & nightlife…all connected by sky bridges. Your adventure begins with an overnight stay in luxury at The Westin Bellevue or Hyatt Regency Bellevue. The Place To Be For Inspiring Fashion, Artful Dining and Vibrant Nightlife. BELLEVUE SQUARE BELLEVUE PLACE LINCOLN SQUARE Located in Bellevue, Washington, just minutes away from Seattle. Experience more at bellevuecollection.com and plan your getaway. 425.454.8096. The Bellevue ColleCTion
  5. 5. Whether you’re visiting wine country in the Tri-Cities, soaring above Seattle atop the Space Needle or enjoying Spokane’s Riverfront Park, there’s a local experience waiting. Ask us where to go for the best local food, shopping, family fun and outdoor adventure when you stay with us! Bellevue • Kelso • Kennewick • Olympia • Pasco Port Angeles • Richland • Seattle • Spokane • Tacoma Vancouver • Walla Walla • Wenatchee • Yakima Ask us where to go for a uniquely local experience. 800–Red Lion redlion.com A1041/0114
  6. 6. ®
  7. 7. 1519 Pike Place Market, Seattle 206-622-2036 • www.eatatlowells.com Lowell’s opens every day of the week for breakfast, lunch, dinner & cocktails at 7AM on all 3 floors! Overlooking Puget Sound with panoramic wall to wall windows, Lowell’s unique “hideaway” is recognized as the friendliest restaurant & bar in Seattle! Seattle’s Award Winning Restaurant & Bar in the HEART of Pike Place Market Open at 7AM every day!
  8. 8. 8 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM Contents FEATURES 30The Wild Waters of Washington Rollicking ocean waves, roar- ing river rapids, and placid lakes beckon those in search of aquatic adventure. By Anne Larkin 38Fest By Northwest Eighteen great Washington music fests attract audiophiles as much for their cool tunes as their breathtaking sights. By Laura D. Redman DEPARTMENTS 15WAnderlust Get lured in with our prime fishing grounds, snowy slopes, literary locales, regional sips, and Native arts. Plus, romantic spots and fun runs for all. 26Calendar From rodeos to barrel tastings, pioneer celebrations to holiday lights, here’s a month-by- month guide to 45 of Washing- ton’s best festivals and events. SEATTLE’S LAKE UNION PHOTOGRAPHBYMICHAELHANSON Seattle By Joel Rogers / joelrogers.com 30 On the covers Mount Rainier By Justin Bailie / tandemstock.com The Palouse By Ben Herndon / tandemstock.com 2014
  9. 9. Please call us at 425-284-5900 or visit heathmankirkland.com • 220 Kirkland Avenue, Downtown Kirkland, Washington the heathman hotel kirkland and trellis restaurant. The perfect pairing. Details. They’re what separate the ordinary from the extraordinary. In a hotel, they’re the difference between accommodations and accommodating, a stay that’s pleasant and one that’s truly memorable, a good meal and a unique culinary experience. Details. They’re why service is still an art at the Heathman Hotel Kirkland and Trellis Restaurant .
  10. 10. 10 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM 4 1 2 7 9 10 8 3 5 6 99 PHOTOGRAPHSFROMTOP:LINDSAYBORDEN,JOHNATHANESPER/DREAMSTIME,LEERENTZ,COURTESYWALLAWALLA.ORG, PIERRELECLERC/SHUTTERSTOCK,GRANTGUNDERSON/TANDEMSTOCK.COM 47 Metro Seattle [1] With a wealth of art and culture, authentic global cuisine, and dreamy water- fronts, Puget Sound is wide open for exploration. 65 North Cascades [2] From tulip fields and family farms to hiking and biking on miles of trails, the North Cas- cades are wildly wonderful. 71 The Islands [3] Washington’s archipel- ago reveals just why it’s a National Monument, with watery expanses and quaint harbor towns. 77 Peninsulas & Coast [4] Rain forest hikes, rocky coasts, white-sand beaches, a historic Victorian village, and more await. 85 The Volcanoes [5] Day-trip to Mount St. Helens, bag Mount Rainier, and learn the rich history of mountain- eering in the state. 93 The Gorge [6] The Columbia River Gorge Scenic Byway has stunning vistas, while trails traverse Vancouver for more views. 99 North Central [7] Outdoor pursuits for every season, a Bavarian hamlet, and glacier-fed Lake Chelan are all part of the fun in the North Central region. 109 Wine Country [8] Get uncorked in Wine Coun- try before geeking out at a former nuclear complex and diving into the indie arts. 117 Northeast [9] Discover Spokane, the cul- tural capital of the inland Northwest, and explore the natural wonders of Washing- ton’s final frontier. 125 Southeast [10] The green and golden hills of the Palouse, North Ameri- ca’s deepest river gorge, and a bustling college town can all be found in the southeast corner of the state. 65 47117 REGIONS 77 109
  11. 11. 12 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM PHOTOGRAPHSFROMLEFT:TUSHARKOLEY/SHUTTERSTOCK,JEFFCAVEN,2009FOTOFRIENDS/SHUTTERSTOCK Washington Lodging Association, Washington Tourism Alliance, and SagaCity Media, Inc. are not responsible for the business practices of facilities mentioned herein, nor are they responsible for changes or variances that occur after publication. Advertising inquiries should be directed to Jeff Adams at SagaCity Media at 206-454-3007; editorial inquiries to Julie H. Case at 206-454-3028; and distribution inquiries to the Washington Lodging Association at 206-306-1001 or visitorsguide@walodging.org. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2014 by the Washington Lodging Association. The Official Publication of the Washington Tourism Alliance PUBLISHED BY Washington Lodging Association in partnership with the Washington Tourism Alliance and SagaCity Media, Inc. WASHINGTON LODGING ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE PRESIDENT AND CEO Jan Simon Aridj CHAIR Zahoor Ahmed, R. C. Hedreen Company, Seattle IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR Cindy Fanning, Silver Cloud Inns & Hotels VICE CHAIR Meghan Wiley, Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites, Pullman TREASURER Matt Van Der Peet, Sheraton Seattle Hotel SECRETARY Frank Welton, Hilton Seattle Airport & Conference Center and DoubleTree by Hilton Seattle Airport ALLIED OFFICER Roy Cupler, CPA, Moss Adams LLP WASHINGTON TOURISM ALLIANCE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Louise Stanton-Masten BOARD CHAIR Cheryl Kilday, Visit Spokane VICE CHAIRS Jane Kilburn, Port of Seattle Andy Olsen, Columbia Hospitality SECRETARY Skip Thompson, The Boeing Company TREASURER John Bookwalter, Bookwalter Winery PAST PRESIDENT/CHAIR Kevin Clark, Argosy Cruises & Tillicum Village SAGACITY MEDIA, INC. PRESIDENT Nicole Vogel VICE PRESIDENT, CUSTOM MEDIA Jeff Adams ADVERTISING SALES Colleen Bagdon, Dixie Duncan SENIOR ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Danielle Williams ADVERTISING ASSISTANT Elizabeth Loori SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, EDITORIAL & OPERATIONS Bill Hutfilz SENIOR EDITOR Julie H. Case ASSOCIATE EDITOR Angela Cabotaje COPY EDITOR Margaret Seiler ART DIRECTOR Samantha Gardner CONTRIBUTING ART DIRECTOR Chuck Kerr PRODUCTION MANAGER Mary Bradford EDITORIAL INTERNS Melena Jankanish, Jessica Winterbauer EDITORIAL BOARD Jeff Adams, Jan Simon Aridj, Julie H. Case, John Cooper, Bill Hutfilz, Jane Kilburn, Marianne Scholl, Louise Stanton-Masten CHERYL KILDAY Chair, Washington Tourism Alliance Board of Directors PLANNING A TRIP can require making some tough decisions. Should you dive into unspoiled wilds or wander through an urban jungle? Get cultured or sat- isfy your taste buds? To that, we say, why choose? In Washington state—where the landscape shifts from rolling wheat fields to coastal sea stacks, mossy rain forests to rushing rivers, glimmering skylines to craggy mountains—you can experience it all. Our millions of acres of forest, thousands of lakes, and 172-island archipelago are ripe for exploration—as are our major urban centers and charming small towns. So much so that you may find yourself wandering the Seattle waterfront one day and then snowshoeing the Mount Rainier foothills the next; floating past nesting bald eagles on the Skagit River, then digging for fossils in Republic. Truly, every corner of the state has something splendid to offer. Diversity also reigns in our cuisine, culture, and cityscapes. Washington boasts museums and attractions in the realms of visual art, literature, popular culture, aviation, and even nuclear power. Tiny towns offer up big personality, while scores of breweries, distilleries, wineries, and coffee roasters add to the flourishing liquid culture around the state. It is a year of anniversaries, too. In 2014, Washington celebrates 125 years of statehood, Smith Tower—once the tallest building west of the Mississippi—turns 100, and Walla Walla Valley celebrates its 30th year as a federal American Viti- cultural Area. It’s this stunning and spectacular variety that makes Washington such a spe- cial place. So whether you’re stopping by to cheer for the Super Bowl champion Seattle Seahawks or to marvel at one of the newest National Monuments, the San Juan Islands, it’s all but impossible to avoid an adventure. We look forward to welcoming you to the Evergreen State! ZAHOOR AHMED Chair, Washington Lodging Association Board of Directors WONDER FULL
  12. 12. www.portseattle.org Cruise Seattle 2014 Start your Alaska Cruise here!
  13. 13. wanderlusts k i a r e a s 16 / r e g i o n a l s i p s 17 / lo c a l g o o d s 1 8 / l i t e r a ry s i t e s 2 0 / n at i v e a rt 2 2 www.experiencewa.com Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014 15 On a brisk October day on the Chehalish River, the banks on either side are dressed in bright yellow leaves, and the water below is full of migrating coho salmon. Carl Burke, who has been fishing in Washington for longer than I’ve been alive, is spin-casting from a jet boat into the brush at the water’s edge where coho salmon like to hide. I’ve hooked dozens of logs and branches already, each time imagining the tug to be a fish, yanking my rod with a jolt of adrenaline, only to realize my catch’s definite lifelessness. Finally, something feels different—it’s clear this is no rotting log. “Hook ’em, hook ’em!” Burke shouts as a silvery dorsal fin emerges from the water. Then he reaches down with the net and grabs the gorgeous fish, lifting it into the air where it thrashes wildly. “That’s a coho for you,” Burke says. “He’ll fight you like crazy.” After that we’re on a roll, and by the end of the day our boat is heavy with salmon cargo. A week—and many salmon dinners—later I depart Anacortes (map p. 72) for the San Juan Islands with seasoned guide Derek Floyd, owner and opera- tor of Anglers Choice Charters (anglerschoicefishing.com). At Eagle Bluff on Cypress Island, a tried-and-true fishing spot, we set our lines, weighted to sink to 100 feet where king salmon are feeding. The San Juans are the ultimate place for this kind of anticipatory wait—as the morning fog lifts, it’s beyond pleasant drifting past pines clinging to rocky islands like overgrown bonsai. By noon, the sun is out and we’re trolling back and forth along James Island. We’ve been keeping our eyes trained on the rods, and finally one jumps up, giving the fish at its end away. A fervent reel brings a 24-inch king to the surface, its scales glinting in the sun. Floyd has caught far more fish in his lifetime than I, but we’re equally thrilled as we pull the fish aboard. The rush of snagging a fish from Washington’s waters doesn’t seem eas- ily diminished; each catch is as heady as the last. And, there are a whole lot to be caught—the list of species is a long (and tasty) one. Westport (p. 78), on the Pacific Coast, lures with the opportunity to fish deep waters and haul in chinook and coho salmon, as well as albacore tuna, halibut, rockfish, and lingcod. All Rivers & Saltwater Charters (allriversguideservice.com) runs express tuna trips July through Halloween, halibut trips during that season in May, and steelhead and salmon excursions in the rivers inland from the coast. Close to a million pink salmon return to the Skagit River each year, while rivers farther in are known for their spirited steelhead. That’s especially true in the Heller Bar area of the Snake River, near Clarkston (p. 126), where thou- sands of the feisty fish pass through from August to March, and on the nearby Grande Ronde, where fly-fishing is popular. And there’s trout fishing—many fishers’ first childhood catch—in lakes across the state. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (wdfw. wa.gov/fishing) stocks many lakes, such as Williams Lake, 30 miles south- west of Spokane (p. 118), plus a handful of high alpine lakes. Come winter there’s even ice fishing for perch, walleye, and trout out on the Lind Coulee arm of Potholes Reservoir, near Moses Lake. —anne larkin cast away A fisherman pitches a line on the salmon-laden Skagit River. PhotographbyfarhadJahanbani Explore the outdoors hooked on washingtoncast a line into the state’s prime fishing grounds.
  14. 14. wanderlust 16 Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014 www.experiencewa.com North 1 Mt. Baker The mountain that holds the world record for snowfall—95 feet fell here in 1998–1999— is huge among board- ers and skiers (including Olympian Angeli Van- Laanen) thanks to trees, bowls, and double blacks galore. winter.mtbaker.us Vertical: 1,500 feet Trails: 38; 23% easy, 35% medium, 42% expert 2 North Cascade Heli For untouched back- country, head to the Methow. North Cascade Heli drops into 300,000 acres among the most glaciated peaks in the continental U.S. If one day isn’t enough, try the three-day yurt trip. heli-ski.com Vertical: varies 3 Loup Loup Ski bowl Methow Valley locals get their turn. Looking for a cheap thrill? Just $40 on Wednesday or Friday ($45 on weekends) gets you the one quad, a J-bar, a towrope, and some 300 acres of alpine terrain. skitheloup.com Vertical: 1,240 feet Trails: 10 Central 4 Stevens Pass Two mountains, three faces, and groomers, gulches, and bowls to spare. This North Cas- cades resort also has night skiing and a park full of boxes and gun poles. stevenspass.com Vertical: 1,800 feet Trails: 37; 11% easy, 54% medium, 35% expert 5 Mission Ridge Being east of the Cas- cades makes for cool, bright winters—and dry powder and blue skies. Take a run on Bomber Bowl and glimpse a B-24 that crashed here in 1944. missionridge.com Vertical: 2,250 feet Trails: 36; 10% easy, 60% medium, 30% expert 6 Alpental & The Summit at Snoqualmie The family-friendly Summit features night skiing, 50-plus kilome- ters of snowshoe and Nordic trails, and tub- ing. Alpental, on the north side of I-90, offers more steeps and deeps, as well as 523 acres of backcountry. summitat snoqualmie.com Vertical: 2,280 feet Trails: 108; 14% easy, 45% medium, 41% expert 7 Crystal Mountain Ascend above the tree line for steeps and deeps, and the chance to drop between trees and rocky chutes at this resort perched in the northeast corner of Mt. Rainier National Park. Don’t ski? Ride the gon- dola for dinner and an up-close view of the mountain. crystal mountainresort.com Vertical: 3,100 feet Trails: 57; 11% easy, 54% medium, 35% expert 8 White Pass Combine the state’s highest base elevation with the dry air of the eastern slopes and you get consistent snow, as well as some of the best tree skiing in the state. This über-family-friendly resort, southeast of Mt. Rainier National Park, also has 18,000 acres of cross-country terrain. skiwhitepass.com Vertical: 2,050 feet Trails: 47; 23% easy, 60% medium, 17% expert East 9 49 Degrees North Come home to moguls, bone-dry powder, and evergreens for everyone. Ditch the skins; the Angel Peak lift grants access to 270 acres of inbounds backcountry. ski49n.com Vertical: 1,851 feet Trails: 82; 30% easy, 40% medium, 30% expert 10 Mt. Spokane This mountain is home to some of the state’s best night skiing and the larg- est certified ski school in the state. Warm up at the summit with fireside hot toddies. mtspokane.com Vertical: 2,000 feet Trails: 45; 23% easy, 45% medium, 32% expert 11 Bluewood Dry powder, short lift lines, and blue skies make this ski area near the Oregon border spe- cial. Don’t miss a cat ride to Vintners Ridge for tree runs. bluewood.com Vertical: 1,125 feet Trails: 24; 27% easy, 43% medium, 30% expert West 12 Hurricane Ridge A mile above sea level, this resort offers terrain said to change weekly, uncongested bowls, and the right to brag you’ve skied in the Olympics: Go off-piste and you’re in Olympic National Park backcountry. hurricane ridge.com Vertical: 800 feet Trails: 10 Everywhere DIY: Grab a Sno- Park permit (parks. wa.gov/206/permits), rent skis or snowshoes from outfitters such as REI (rei.com), and head to any of the 120 public Sno-Parks. Find every- thing from sledding hills to skate lanes to snow- mobiling, as well as the occasional sled dog sighting. —julie h. case Explore winter get up,get downvolcanoes, multiple mountain ranges, and tons of precipitation make for exceptional winter pursuits. going down Skiers and boarders ride Edelweiss Bowl at Alpental. Photographbyjeffcaven 1 2 3 4 56 7 8 9 10 11 12
  15. 15. www.experiencewa.com Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014 17 Sip the State hen it comes to beverages, we’re lucky. Climate and geography coalesce for some of the nation’s best growing conditions. Here’s how we toast our fortune. Beer: Second only to Germany in hop growing,we also rank eighth in the U.S. for craft breweries per capita. Rainier Brewing and Olympia Brewing were born in Seattle and Tumwater (map p. 48) respec- tivelyinthelate1800s,andthenowshutteredYakima Brewing & Malting Co. was America’s first micro- brewery after Prohibition. Today, it’s hop-driven India pale ales and imperial ales fromsuchbreweriesasTacoma’s(p.48)HarmonBrewing(harmonbrewingco.com) and Yakima’s (p. 110) Bale Breaker Brewing Company (balebreaker.com), plus stouts and porters from the likes of Winthrop’s (p. 100) Old Schoolhouse Brewery (oldschoolhousebrewery.com), that draw raves. Spirits: Legislation in 2008 created a craft distillery license, and Washington now has more than 70 licensed distillers. Whiskey led the revival, first at the hands of Spokane’s (p. 118) Dry Fly and now with the likes of Woodinville’s (p. 48) Woodin- ville Whiskey Co. (woodinvillewhiskeyco.com). In Seattle, Sodo Spirits is making the country’s only shochu, a Japanese barley-based distillate, while 3 Howls Distill- ery(3howls.com)andSunLiquor(sunliquor.com)werethefirsttoproduceaSeattle rum. And Gig Harbor’s (p. 78) Heritage Distilling Company (heritagedistilling.com) makes spirits and teaches guests to produce their own. Vino: The second-largest premium wine producer in the country, Washington has 750-plus wineries—across 13 American Viticultural Areas—producing nearly 12 million cases of wine annually. Growing regions range from hot and sunny Red Mountain (p. 110) to cool and elevated areas ideal for Riesling. Tasting rooms abound—from Vintner’s Village, just off I-90 in Prosser (p. 110), to Woodinville, with its 90-plus wineries. Walla Walla Valley (p. 110) is best known as wine country, and Lake Chelan (p. 100) is where lakes and grapes gloriously collide. Buzz, No Buzz: Not all here is boozy. Coffee has been big since Starbucks opened in 1971, while Burlington’s (p. 66) Sakuma Bros. (sakumamarketstand.com) has been handpicking and crafting tea for a decade. DRY Soda’s natural sodas bubble withlavenderandblood orange,andgingerbeerfromsmall producers like Rachel’s Ginger Beer has taken bars—and now Pike Place Market—by storm. —Erin James Lace ’em up On the Run Splendid scenery, vibrant communi- ties, and a thriving running scene make the Evergreen State a great place to get your jog on. Best of all, it’s also home to some of the country’s oldest, largest, and most distinctive running events. Tiptoe through the tulips in Burl- ington’s (map p. 66) Tulip Run (Apr 5). March across Victorian Port Townsend’s (p. 78) Fort Worden, savoring the sweet scents of rhododendron blossoms in the Rhody Run 12k (May 18), or ven- ture to Spokane (p. 118) to run alongside 50,000 others in the Bloomsday 12k (May 4), the third-largest timed run- ning race in North America. Run within the shadows of the Olym- pic Mountains and along the Strait of Juan de Fuca (p. 78) in the North Olympic Discovery Marathon and Half Marathon (June 1), join military battalions running through Tacoma’s (p. 48) Point Defiance Park in the Sound to Narrows 5 and 12k (June 14), or roll along the Columbia River—and back in time at historic Fort Vancouver (p. 94)— in the Vancouver USA Marathon and Half Marathon (June 15). Sprint spectator-lined downtown streets and dart along the Alaskan Way Viaduct in Seattle’s (p. 48) Seafair Torchlight 8k Run (July 26). Trace por- tions of Captain Clark’s historic coastal walk at Long Beach’s (p. 78) Discovery Trail Half Marathon (Sept 13), or race along the Salish Sea under majestic Mount Baker’s snowy eye in the Bell- ingham Bay Marathon (Sept 28; p. 66). Feast on energy bars and gels on Thanksgiving Day weekend with more than 15,000 runners and walkers dur- ing the Seattle Marathon and Half Marathon (Nov 30), a holiday tradition for more than 40 years. —Craig Romano W Woodinville whiskey Company Photographsfromtop:JFergusonphotos/Dreamstime.com, courtesywoodinvillewhiskeycompany
  16. 16. wanderlust discoveries Made Here From the rolling hills of the Palouse to the coastal sea stacks of the Olympic Peninsula, there’s plenty to marvel at in Washington. Revel in our regional riches with locally made goods that showcase the best of the state. Photographbyzechjohnson 01 | Liberty Orchards dusts its jellied Aplets and Cotlets with powdered sugar for any sweet tooth. Cashmere (map p. 100), libertyorchards.com 02 | Each of Brown & Haley’s buttery, chocolate- and-almond-coated Almond Roca toffee con- fections comes swathed in gold foil. Tacoma (p. 48), brown-haley.com 03 | These solid beeswax Totem Candles from Grain Design are sculpted by hand and perfume the air with a sweet honey scent. Bainbridge Island (p. 78), graindesign.com 04 | Volcanic ash from the infamous 1980 erup- tion has been swirled into the colorful blown-glass art sold at the Mount St. Helens Forest Learning Center gift shop. Toutle (p. 86), 360-274-7750 05 | What’s the secret to Anderson Family Farm’s lotions and soap bars? Pure, natural milk from its herd of goats. Ellensburg (p. 100), andersonfamily farm1979.com 06 | Dry Fly Distillery’s award-winning Washington Bourbon 101 is crafted from locally grown corn, wheat, and barley, result- ing in a subtly sweet, oaky taste. Spokane (p. 118), dryflydistilling.com 07 | Palouse Brand takes “farm to table” to a new level, labeling its Par- dina lentils with the exact field in which they were grown. Palouse (p. 126), palousebrand.com 08 | San Juan Island Sea Salt harvests its finishing salt by hand before let- ting the sun’s evaporating power do the rest. Friday Harbor (p. 72), sanjuan islandseasalt.com 09 | Liberty Bottleworks crafts recycled-aluminum water bottles that pay homage to Washington with creative designs of Mount Rainier, Seattle’s public transit system, and the Seahawks’ 12th Man. Union Gap (p. 110), libertybottles.com 10 | Craft-roasted in small batches, award-winning Ganesha espresso from Tony’s Coffee features hints of floral and choco- late. Bellingham (p. 66), tonyscoffee.com 11 | Olympic Lavender Farm cultivates the fra- grant flower on five acres of Olympic Peninsula land. Pick up a bundle of dried lavender, or choose from an array of bath products infused with the delicate scent. Sequim (p. 78), olympiclavender.com —angela cabotaje 1 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 3 18 Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014 www.experiencewa.com
  17. 17. - NEWCASTLE,WA - • Experience two championship-caliber 18-hole golf courses, co-designed by Robert E. Cupp and Fred Couples featuring awe-inspiring views of Seattle, LakeWashington and the Olympic Mountains • Perfect your game at our extensive, state-of-the-art practice facility • Dine in the Calcutta Grill and enjoy stunning sunsets from our outdoor terrace • Hold your next event in our impressive clubhouse with more than 8,000 square feet of indoor & outdoor meeting space • Conveniently located just 20 minutesfrom Seattle and Bellevue www.NewcastleGolf.com (425) 793-5566 15500 Six Penny Lane - Newcastle, WA
  18. 18. wanderlust Book It ome to a slew of literary locales, Washington has served as muse for many a best-selling author. The state’s rainy reputation moved Twilight author Stephenie Meyer to set her novels in the Olympic Pen- insula logging town of Forks (map p. 78), but it’s the maritime charm of Port Orchard (p. 78)—hometown of romance writer Debbie Macomber—that shines in her Cedar Cove series. Nearby, quaint Bainbridge Island (p. 78) inspired David Guterson’s fictional San Piedro Island in Snow Falling on Cedars. Looking for something a little edgier? Journey south on the Kitsap Peninsula to the site of the notorious “health” sanitarium depicted in Gregg Olsen’s true crime book Starvation Heights. If you’re hunting for Sasquatch, the ancient forests along the Columbia River are prominently featured in Molly Gloss’s Wild Life. The San Juan Islands (p. 72) are the setting for the psychological thriller Folly by Laurie R. King, author of the highly acclaimed Mary Russell series, while Skagit Valley is where La Conner (p. 66) author Tom Robbins placed his quirky masterpiece, Another Roadside Attraction. Fans of E. L. James’s Fifty Shades of Grey should check out Seattle’s (p. 48) Escala condo tower, the fictional home of bondage-loving billionaire Christian Grey. Readers of Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet can step back in time at the historic Panama Hotel in Seattle’s International District, while devotees of Maria Semple’s Where’d You Go, Bernadette? can venture to Queen Anne Hill, where the cranky title character seethed about the Emerald City’s many quirks. There’s plenty of literary action east of the Cascades, too, from Teri Hein’s Atomic Farmgirl, a memoir about growing up in the shadow of the Hanford nuclear reservation, to Amanda Coplin’s haunting novel, The Orchardist, set in the apple and apricot orchards of the Wenatchee Valley. Spokane (p. 118) is the setting for a good chunk of Jess Walter’s darkly comic Citizen Vince, and the city’s historic Davenport Hotel was once the home of early 20th-century poet Vachel Lindsay. Still up for literary landmarks? The nearby Spokane Indian Reservation is home to both Sherman Alexie and the characters of his short story collection The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven. —Diane Mapes shop around Antique Me In these antique-friendly towns, forag- ing for treasure is part of the fun. Bellingham Artwork, jewelry, pot- tery, and fabulous midcentury finds can be had at Penny Lane Antique Mall (pennylaneantiquemall.com).Fairhaven Antique Mall (fairhavenantiquemall. com), located in the city’s historic dis- trict, is cozy yet packs plenty of gems, including dolls, Depression glass, and holiday collectibles. (map p. 66) Cashmere When it comes to antiques, this town doesn’t fool around. With 70,000 square feet, Apple Annie’s Antique Gallery (appleannieantiques. com) offers collectibles from every era. Nearby, Cashmere Antique Mall (antiquemallatcashmere.vpweb.com) has more than 15,000 square feet of radios, birdhouses, and more. (p. 100) Centralia This quaint town, just 30 minutes south of state capital Olympia, boasts an entire “Antique Row” along Tower Avenue. Plus, Centralia Antique Mall (201 S Pearl St) is just around the corner from Tower and houses 135 dealers. (p. 86) SeattleSeattleAntiquesMarket(seattle antiquesmarket.com) and Antiques at Pike Place (antiquesatpikeplace.com) are both top-notch malls with plenty of fantastic and funky finds. (p. 48) Snohomish This riverfront town calls itself the “Antique Capital of the North- west,” thanks to its more than 20 shops featuring 175-plus dealers. (p. 48) Walla Walla Shady Lawn Antiques (shadylawnantiques.com) features vintage tools, fishing gear, and cabin décor; the Antique Mall of Walla Walla (antiquemallwallawalla.com) has 5,000 squarefeetofvintageclothes,books,and gardencollectibles.(p.110) —Diane Mapes H 20 Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014 www.experiencewa.com snohomish Photographleftcourtesydavenporthotel,rightcourtesysnohomish.org davenport hotel
  19. 19. Just 30 minutes north of Seattle, Woodinville Wine Country is home to over 100 award-winning wineries and tasting rooms.
  20. 20. wanderlust Hibulb Cultural Center On a 50-acre natural history preserve, this Tulalip (map p. 48) tribute features historic canoes, a re-created long- house, and exhibits labeled in both English and the Coast Salish language Lushootseed. hibulbculturalcenter.org Lelooska Foundation & Museum Woodcarving workshops and evenings of song and cer- emonial mask demos bring Northwest Coast traditions to life at this cultural center near Ariel (p. 86), southwest of Mount St. Helens, where you can tour the collection of tomahawks, cornhusk bags, and other preserved relics. lelooska.org Suquamish Museum Amid towering trees on the Kitsap Peninsula, this LEED Gold–certified museum traces the Suquamish (p. 78) history back to the last ice age. Admire baskets, carv- ings, and artifacts before paying respects at Chief Seat- tle’s gravesite a few blocks away. suquamishmuseum.org Tillicum Village In spring and summer, Argosy Cruises’ boats depart from Seattle’s (p. 48) Pier 55 for Blake Island, where you can admire the totems or fill up at a salmon bake. argosycruises .com/tillicum-village Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center With picture windows peer- ing out onto the Columbia River, this Stevenson (p. 94) museum recounts the 40- million-year history of the Gorge region. Trace the first peoples’ influence, from the Cascade Chinook to the Clah- clehlah village visited by Lewis and Clark. columbiagorge.org Omak Stampede Every August, this annual event stampedes into Omak (p. 100) with rodeo events and the Colville Confederated Tribes’ Indian Encampment and Pow Wow, featuring a tepee village and dancing. omakstampede.org Yakama Nation Museum and Cultural Center From traditional garb to life- size dwellings of the Plateau People, the history of Yakama Nation’s various tribes are on display at this 12,000-square- foot museum in Toppenish (p. 110). Guided tours are available by appointment, Monday through Friday. yakamamuseum.com Lummi Nation Stommish Water Festival This celebration of Coast Salish culture includes war canoe races and a tradi- tional salmon barbecue on the Lummi reservation near Bellingham (p. 66), June 19 through 22. stommish.com Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture Learn about the Native cultures influencing the northeast corner of the state, from the indigenous Northern Plateau Indians to 1925’s National Indian Congress, plus the Inland Northwest Narrative: Crossroads and Confluence exhibit on display for two-plus years at this Smithsonian-affiliated museum in Spokane (p. 118). northwestmuseum.org Confluence Project An unprecedented collabora- tion between artist Maya Lin and Pacific Northwest tribes, this seven-site art installation reinterprets the journey of Lewis and Clark. One of the recently completed installa- tions is a Nez Perce–inspired listening circle made of sculpted earth on a Snake River island at Clarkston’s (p. 126) Chief Timothy Park. confluenceproject.org —angela cabotaje Lelooska Foundation & Museum sandhill crane discoveries Native Art Towering cedar totems, engaging museums, and annual cultural celebrations throughout the state tell the millennia-old legacies of Washington’s storied tribes. 22 Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014 www.experiencewa.com Photographleftbybeccaolmsted,rightTaniaThomson/shutterstock,bottombytimpatrickphotography Omak stampede spot wildlife For the Birds Thanks to its place on the Pacific fly- way, Washington contains some of the best bird-watching in the country—and annual bird-based bashes that celebrate their arrival. Skagit Eagle Festival During winter the Skagit River hosts one of the larg- est concentrations of bald eagles in the continental U.S. Concrete, Rockport, and Marblemount (map p. 66) cele- brate our national bird in January with a month of float trips and interpretive programs. concrete-wa.com Port Susan Snow Goose and Birding Festival In February, a blizzard of up to 100,000 snow geese blankets the Still- aguamish and Skagit River deltas near Stanwood (p. 48). Accompany natural- ists by foot or shuttle to catch a gander of the geese. snowgoosefest.org Grays Harbor’s Shorebird Festival Observing tens of thousands of sand- pipers and plovers is a sure thing at this April event in Hoquiam (p. 78). Between bird-watching forays, dabble at a birding marketplace and nature fair. shorebirdfestival.com Othello’s Sandhill Crane Festival More than 400,000 lesser sandhill cranes cram the channeled scablands surrounding Othello (p. 126) each spring. After crane spotting, attend a seminar, art program, or naturalist pro- gram. othellosandhillcranefestival.org Puget Sound Bird Fest In Septem- ber celebrate Puget Sound’s birds in Edmonds (p. 48). Take a guided beach or marsh walk, sound cruise, photog- raphy workshop, or native plant garden tour. pugetsoundbirdfest.org Birdfest Welcome the arrival of sandhill cranes at Ridgefield (p. 94) in October with a guided hike or paddling tour along the Columba River’s snaking sloughs. Afterward migrate to a salmon bake, live bird show, or storytelling session. ridgefieldfriends.org/birdfest —Craig Romano
  21. 21. greatwolf.com/grandmound | 800.640.9653 (WOLF) Visit bestwesternWashington.com/bwr for complete terms and conditions. All Best Western Rewards® program rules apply. See bestwesternrewards.com for additional program terms. For a list of most current properties, local attractions, and events visit bestwesternWashington.com. Amenities vary by location. Best Western and the Best Western marks are service marks or registered service marks of Best Western International, Inc. ©2014 Best Western International, Inc. All rights reserved. Each Best Western® branded hotel is independently owned and operated. Join Best Western Rewards® , our FREE rewards program, and now through December 31, 2014, you can earn 2,000 bonus points for every qualified night you stay at a Best Western hotel in Washington State for up to 4 nights! Every U.S. dollar spent at Best Western hotels will earn you points. Points can be redeemed for free room nights, partner rewards, merchandise, dining, retail and gift cards. So, stay more–earn more! Join the club today. bestwesternWashington.com/bwr 1.800.237.8483 | Promo code: WAVG14 Reward Your Stay WashingtonVisitorsGd 2014 Ad 12-13.indd 1 12/16/13 4:12 PM
  22. 22. 24 Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014 www.experiencewa.com wanderlust Get romantic Stateof Love From sweethearts stealing smooches dur- ing a sunset cruise to couples canoodling on a sleigh ride through the snow, one thing’s clear: The Evergreen State knows how to do romance right. Lovebirds tiptoe to tulip fields during the annual Skagit Valley Tulip Festival in April, where the colorful blooms create a sweet-smelling backdrop. Meanwhile, nearby La Conner (map p. 66) is always a dreamy setting for whispering sweet noth- ings with a historic marina, gallery-lined streets, and cozy restaurants right along the Swinomish Channel. In summer, it’s hard to top the pic- turesque San Juan Islands, which boast secluded beaches, glimmering coves, and forested hills. Venture out for a bike ride through rolling greenery, or kayak together to a private picnic on shore. Farther south, Whidbey Island seems made for wining and dining with eateries specializing in Penn Cove mussels that are pulled fresh from nearby waters. Let days blend into a delicious blur as you and your beau stroll and sip through Washington Wine Coun- try, where wineries and tasting rooms are an ideal way to get love-drunk. In North Central Washington, near the Columbia River, soak in breathtaking views from a cliffside perch at Cave B Estate Win- ery in Quincy (p. 100). Hint: the 100-acre vineyard also has an intimate spa. Even more enamoring sights abound around the state: In the shadow of Mount Rainier, Paradise’s (p. 86) alpine mead- ows are lush with wildflowers in July and August. The sun puts on a blissful show, melting into the horizon in a vivid orange haze, as ferries coast across Puget Sound. Centuries-old trees and moss-heavy branches create ancient, awe-inspiring splendor in the Olympic Peninsula’s Hoh Rain Forest. And nestled in the Cascade foothills, Leavenworth (p. 100) gives sweet- hearts reason to snuggle with horse-pulled sleigh rides in winter and glimmering lights that illuminate the snowy hamlet. For those looking to tie the knot here— including same-sex couples—a marriage license is valid after a three-day waiting period and for up to 60 days. Licenses may be obtained in person (or via mail) and fulfilled at any of the state’s romantic locations. —angela cabotaje PhotographbyEdmundLowe/gettyimages puget sound
  23. 23. Calendar 26 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM 22 Mystery Weekend (Langley) Take part in an interactive whodunit dur- ing this two-day mystery play. Feb 22–23; visitlangley.com 27 Wintergrass (Bellevue) Finger-plucking fun includes bluegrass per- formances, impromptu jam sessions, and more. Feb 27–Mar 2; acoustic sound.org MARCH 07 Penn Cove MusselFest (Coupeville) Visit mussel farms and get a taste of the famous bivalves. Mar 7–9; thepenncove musselfestival.com 28 Badger Mountain Challenge (Tri-Cities) Join ultramarathoners on 15k, 50k, or 100- mile endurance runs on Badger Mountain. Mar 28–29; badgermountain challenge.com 28 Sandhill Crane Festival (Othello) Crane viewing and more fill this bird- watching event. Mar 28–30; othellosandhill cranefestival.org 29 Taste Washington (Seattle) The largest single-region food and wine event in the nation. Mar 29–30; taste washington.org APRIL 07 Get Lit! Festival (Spo- kane) Bookworms gather for a week of readings, poetry slams, and wordy fun. April 7–13; outreach .ewu.edu/getlit  25 Spring Barrel Tasting (Yakima Valley) Get a tasting peek at vintages in the making from 40 wineries. Apr 25–27; wineyakimavalley.org 26 Black Lake Fishing Derby (Ilwaco) A family- friendly day of fishing on Long Beach Peninsula. Apr 26; ilwaco-wa.gov MAY 06 Duck Dodge (Seattle) Weekly sailboat races get a dose of silliness with wacky costumes and awards. Tuesdays, May 6–Nov 4; duckdodge.org JANUARY 04 Skagit Eagle Festival (Concrete) Enjoy raptor presentations, float trips, Native American music, and the chance to see majestic bald eagles. Weekends, Jan 4–26; concrete-wa.com/skagit- eagle-festival-2014 18 Elma Chamber Wine and Seafood Festival Sample seafood, coastal cuisine, and wines from more than 25 Washing- ton wineries. Jan 18; elmachamber.org 23 Spokane International Film Festival See a variety of indie flicks, and join in post-film discus- sions with the movie- makers. Jan 23–Feb 1; spokanefilmfestival.org FEBRUARY 05 Northwest Flower and Garden Show (Seattle) More than 20 display gardens, lectures from luminaries, and 100-plus seminars help green thumbs grow. Feb 5–9; gardenshow.com F I N D OU T W H AT’S H A PPE N I NG AC RO S S T H E STAT E T H I S Y E A R 09 Balloon Stampede (Walla Walla) Dozens of hot-air balloons launch into the sky during the 40th anniversary of this event. May 9–11; wwvchamber.com 10 Lilac Festival (Spokane) Parades, a car show, and a marathon com- memorate this 76-year- old festival. May 10–17; spokanelilacfestival.org 23 Northwest Folklife Fes- tival (Seattle) Enjoy this free festival dedicated to ethnic, traditional, and folk expression. May 23–26; nwfolklife.org JUNE 07 Maritime Gig Festival (Gig Harbor) A grand parade, historic boat show, and live music highlight this annual celebration. June 7–8; gigharborchamber.net 19 Celebrate Walla Walla Valley Wine Sip and learn about syrah at this wine event, featuring 70-plus winemakers, lectures, and vineyard tours. June 19–21; celebratewallawalla. squarespace.com PHOTOGRAPHBYTOMDOWD/DREAMSTIME.COM,TOPBYSILHOUETTELOVER/SHUTTERSTOCK DUCK DODGE Sailboats race Tuesday nights on Seattle’s Lake Union.
  24. 24. Lynnwood Tourism Washington State Visitors Guide Ad 1/6 Page Vertical - 2.1875”x 4.75”- Full Color 1/2014 www.LynnwoodTourism.comwww.LynnwoodTourism.com Or Call 800-662-2044 PlantoStayinLynnwood 15MinutesNorth ofSeattle 10Minutesfrom BoeingTour Lodging40%Less ThanSeattle LegendaryShopping ParkingAlwaysFree Coming to the Pacific Northwest? Galleries, cafes & bistros, boutiques, day spas, fabulous festivals, spring & summer public markets, performing arts center, theaters, beaches, murals, waterfront walkways, underwater dive park, award winning marina, ferry terminal and rail station. Minutes north of Seattle. VisitEdmonds.com 1-877-775-6934 VisitEdmonds.com Edmonds Port of EVERETT MARINA Everett is a convenient and affordable option! The Port of Everett Marina is located just north of Seattle on Port Gardner Bay. Its waterfront amenities and island views provide a great destination for visitors and boaters alike. Come explore what we have to offer! www.portofeverett.com | 425.259.3164 PO Box 538 Everett, WA 98206 BOEING TOUR 800.464.1476 8415 Paine Field Blvd Mukilteo • WA Futureofflight.org HISTORYIN THE MAKING.SEE EXPERIENCE THE ADVENTURE OF A LIFETIME WITHOUT TAKING ONE TO GET HERE. Just minutes north of Seattle. OPEN UP to Snohomish County, there’s a treasure trove of adventure waiting for you to discover.
  25. 25. PHOTOGRAPHBYJOEVIESTI/VIESTIPHOTO.COM 28 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM 20 Summer Solstice Art Walk (Bellingham) Soak up local art and historic charm in the Fairhaven enclave. June 20; fairhaven.com 21 Cycle de Vine (Chelan) A 35-mile ride with rest stops at wineries. June 21; cycledevine.com 28 Strawberry Festival (Bellevue) Enjoy straw- berry shortcake and family entertainment. June 28–29; bellevue strawberryfestival.org 28 Hoopfest (Spokane) The world’s largest three-on- three basketball event. June 28–29; spokane hoopfest.net 28 Recycled Arts Festival (Vancouver) Artists turn trash into treasure at this eco-fest. June 28–29; recycledartsfestival.com JULY 12 Skagit Valley Highland Games (Mount Vernon) Kilts, bagpipes, and fiddles abound at this traditional Scottish ath- letics event. July 12–13, celticarts.org 18 Northwest Raspberry Festival (Lynden) Celebrate the nation’s largest harvest of rasp- berries with live music and plenty of chances to taste the berries. July 18–19; lynden.org 18 Sequim Lavender Festival It’s all about lavender with farm tours, live music, and street fairs. July 18–20; lavenderfestival.com AUGUST 01 Anacortes Arts Festival An art bash with 250- plus artisan booths and live music galore. Aug 1–3; anacortesarts festival.com 07 Omak Stampede Rodeos, Native American and Western art, and a tepee village highlight this 80-year-old event. Aug 7–10; omak stampede.org 18 International Kite Festival (Long Beach) It’s a week dedicated to defying gravity. Don’t miss the unbelievable indoor kite flyers. Aug 18–24; kitefestival.com 22 National Lentil Festival (Pullman) Street fairs, open-air concerts, cook- ing demos, and the world’s largest bowl of lentil chili are part of the fun in the Palouse. Aug 22–23; lentilfest.com 22 Seattle International Beerfest Mugs runneth over with more than 200 beers from 16 different countries. Aug 22–24; seattlebeerfest.com 29 Packwood Flea Market Browse antiques and more at this mega flea market. Aug 29– Sept 1; packwoodflea market.com 29 Ellensburg Rodeo Watch ropers, riders, and steer wrestlers at one of the top rodeo arenas in the nation. Aug 29–Sept 1; ellensburgrodeo.com SEPTEMBER 05 Washington State Fair (Puyallup) More than one million fair-goers enjoy rides, food, and fair fun at the largest annual attraction in the state. Sept 5–21; thefair.com 19 Valleyfest (Spokane Valley) Marathons, bike races, and boating fill this three-day event. Sept 19–21; valleyfest.org 19 Port Townsend Film Festival Enjoy scores of documentaries, short films, and features. Sept 19–21; ptfilmfest.com 26 The Great Prosser Balloon Rally Watch pilots from around the region inflate their hot air balloons and launch into the sky. Sept 26–28; prosserballoonrally.org OCTOBER 01 Savor the San Juans A monthlong celebration of the state’s archipel- ago, with food, farmers markets, and harvest festivals. Oct 1–31; visitsanjuans.com/savor 03 Oktoberfest (Leaven- worth) Don lederhosen and partake in German- CALENDAR themed fun at this Bavar- ian village. Weekends, Oct 3–18; leavenworth oktoberfest.com 04 Old Apple Tree Festival (Vancouver) Celebrate the oldest living apple tree in the Northwest with activities for chil- dren, cider pressings, live music, and food. Oct 4; visitvancouverusa.com NOVEMBER 14 Taste of Tulalip Savor sips from dozens of wineries and bites from award-winning chefs. Nov 14–15; tasteof tulalip.com 28 Bellevue Magic Season Glide across the area’s largest open-air ice arena, watch holiday drum and light shows, and see dazzling lights at the botanical garden. Nov 28–Jan 11, 2015; magicseason.com DECEMBER 05 Christmas Lighting Festival (Leavenworth) Sing carols, enjoy roasted chestnuts, and meet St. Nick as holiday lights illuminate a hamlet in the hills. Weekends, Dec 5–21; leavenworth.org 31 First Night Tri-Cities (Kennewick) Live music, fireworks, and perfor- mances highlight this alcohol-free, family- friendly New Year’s Eve celebration. Dec 31; firstnighttricities.com OMAK STAMPEDE A tepee village highlights local Native culture.
  26. 26. August 22, 23 & 24, 2014 Fri. Noon-7 • Sat. 10-7 • Sun. 10-5 EXIT 81 EXIT 79 GARLIC FEST NATIONALAVE FREE Parking! $5 General Admission $4 Seniors 65+ & Military Kids 7 & under FREE Free Parking • No Pets or Smoking For more information, go to www.ChehalisGarlicFest.com An Advocate Agency Production SW Washington Fairgrounds 2555 N. National Ave. Chehalis, WA Garlic Themed Cuisine Artisans & Craft Vendors Antique Alley Kid’s Activities Chef Demonstrations Live Music Cloves & Vines Wine Tasting Featuring Regional Wineries GARLIC BEER! Beer Garden Garlicious’ ChilLounge 18th Annual 425.454.8497 River Park Square 808 W. Main Avenue, Spokane 509.838.7115 www.oilandvinegarusa.com Bellevue Square Shopping Center
  27. 27. 30 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM of Was TheWild Waters
  28. 28. WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 31 WESTHAVEN STATE PARK shingtonBy ANNE LARKIN Photograph by JUSTIN MYERS FROM OCEAN WAVES TO GLACIAL LAKES, RAGING RIVERS TO PLACID STREAMS, THERE’S AN ADVENTURE FOR EVERYONE.
  29. 29. 32 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM “PADDLE, PADDLE!” I hear hollered from behind me for what must be the hundredth time this morning. Body balanced on my surfboard, I give it all I’ve got. My arms windmill at my sides, propelling me along with the swelling wave. Then I feel it—the force of the water working with me rather than against me— and I hop to my feet and stay there, gliding, sailing, flying toward shore. The nose of my board bonks into the sand, and I leap off, buzzing with the joy of my surfing success. I’m at Westhaven State Park, just outside the fishing town of Westport on the Olym- pic Peninsula, surfing the jetty. I’ve been out here since sunrise, working up the courage and coordination to stand up on my surfboard, rented from Steepwater Surf Shop in town. Stuart, my boyfriend (and, today, my surf coach), rides in, too, landing at the beach beaming. We got lucky; the swell is outstanding today. Back out on my board behind the far- thest break, I watch a squadron of brown pelicans playing with the surf, hugging the cresting waves, dipping their wings in the spray. I’m cozy in my neoprene, happy to just sit out here and feel the Pacific Ocean under and around me, the sun shining on my cheeks while I gaze out over the beach toward the far-off Olympics. It’s the beginning of summer, a glori- ous season in Washington, and I’ve got big GO FLY A KITE The hot, dry wind gusts that sweep out of the desert and into the Columbia River Gorge are so extreme waves form on the river. Once renowned for its wind- surfing scene, the area between Beacon Rock and Alderdale is now the epicenter of a new extreme—kiteboarding. Outfitters in Bingen and White Salmon offer rental gear and lessons, but take heed: this is no surf turf for beginners. A better launchpad might be near Everett. A passenger ferry transports swimmers and kiters to Jetty Island (ci.everett. wa.us), a two-mile-long walk on (though cars are welcome) to the Hyak, one of 22 ferries in Washington’s iconic fleet, for an hour-long journey past evergreen shores poking out of the fog. We dock next to Spring Street Landing, where we plan to meet the crew. Our ves- sel is Iris, a 42-foot classic cutter built in 1934, skillfully piloted by Morgan, daughter of captain-owner Art Lohrey and a long- time sailor and islander. Along with the Iris, which takes groups of up to six out on afternoon and sunset sails, San Juan Classic plans for the next few months. It starts with surfing, and soon I’ll be exploring as many of the state’s 157 miles of coastline, 169 riv- ers, and 8,000 lakes as I can, in hot pursuit of watery adventure. A few weeks later, I find myself farther north, past the peaks I could just barely see from the surfboard, bound for Friday Harbor and a day trip with San Juan Clas- sic Day Sailing. After a scenic 90-minute drive from our home base in Seattle to the ferry terminal in Anacortes, Stuart and I PHOTOGRAPHTOP:JOSEFHANUS/SHUTTERSTOCK,BOTTOMBYKENSTRINGFELLOW WE SPEND A COUPLE OF BLISSFUL HOURS GLIDING BETWEEN THE ROCKY ISLANDS, WATCHING THE PINES WHIP BY. From within the Canadian Rocky Moun- tains the Columbia River rises, then descends through Washington and turns west—forming the Oregon border—until it reaches the Pacific. Hells Canyon is here, as is an entire archipelago (the San Juan Islands) and miles-long glacier-fed lakes. No matter your sport, you can do it in Washington. Here are more ways to get on the water. Water World COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE
  30. 30. WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 33 isthmus of sand jutting into Puget Sound. WHITE-WATER THE VOLCANOES Volcanoes are hot. Snow is cold. When spring comes, the local volca- nic peaks around Mount Adams send gushing torrents of snowmelt cascading through the White Salmon River. Steep river canyon walls and narrow shoots make for one very wild ride, with a variety of outfitters (mtadams chamber.com). TAKE A REMOTE BOAT EXCURSION Kayak between the U.S. and Canada via North Cascades National Park’s Ross Lake (nps. gov/noca/planyour visit/boating-on-ross- lake.htm). A full 19 boat-in campsites are scattered around the lake—some with docks, all requiring a back- country pass. Or board the Lady of the Lake in Chelan and set sail across the 50.5-mile- long Lake Chelan for Stehekin (stehekin. com), a tiny community, with a beloved bakery, only accessible by foot, boat, or floatplane. JET BOAT AWAY The Snake River flows through Hells Canyon— the nation’s deepest river gorge—offering up stunning, craggy river views. Kayakers and canoeists regularly paddle the river, but jet boats out of Clarkston (hellscanyonvisitor.com) offer an exciting way to see even more. Stop for a glimpse of ancient petroglyphs. DO A DAM TOUR In the North Cascades, Seattle City Light’s Diablo Lake Boat Tour (seattle.gov/light/ tours/skagit/boat. asp) offers views of plummeting waterfalls during cruises on this brilliant blue lake ringed by emerald forests and snow-capped peaks. On the east side of the state visitors can take a tour of the Grand Coulee Dam (usbr.gov/ pn/grandcoulee) and even catch a laser show. PHOTOGRAPHSFROMTOPRIGHT:JOSEFHANUS/SHUTTERSTOCK,COURTESY OSPREYRAFTING,COURTESYSANJUANCLASSICDAYSAILING Day Sailing also sets out from Roche Har- bor on Dirigo II, a 72-foot schooner built in 1939 for private charters and planned multiday sails. Though our trip with Iris starts out under gray skies, the sun soon forces its way through the clouds, making Iris’s seafoam-green paint and bronze fittings gleam. We spend a couple of blissful hours gliding between the rocky islands, watching the pines whip by, imagining the sweetness of a simple life out here amongst the harbor seals. After Iris returns us to the harbor, our day ends with a ferry ride at dusk, the lights of the islands’ shores winking goodbye. ON ANOTHER HOT SUMMER DAY, I’m heading east for a very different kind of boating. After a two-hour drive along leafy Highway 2, my friend Beth and I emerge in Leavenworth, Washington’s own little Bavaria, where Osprey Rafting has been operating for 20 years. Today we’re raft- ing the Wenatchee, a powerful river that runs through the Cascades for 53 miles. Osprey has a put-in just around the corner from the shop, and after a safety talk and paddling lesson, we eagerly hop into the waiting raft. Soon after entering the river, we splash through Triple Threat and Tinley Falls—two Class IV rapids—laughing and screaming with glee. After the initial hoopla, the river calms and loops back in toward town, car- rying on past the gabled chalets. While we embarked on a half-day rafting trip, there are a ton of ways to raft with Osprey: mel- low family rides, longer trips down to a barbecue at their takeout in Cashmere, happy-hour trips that yo-yo those first few rapids and end with a beer token for Leavenworth’s Icicle Brewing, or tubing trips, the ultimate in floating relaxation. Rafting starts on the Wenatchee whenever the snow begins to melt—around April or May—and runs until Labor Day. Trace the Wenatchee south to where it meets the Columbia, then continue farther From left: the San Juan Islands; San Juan Clas- sic Day Sailing; Osprey Rafting; and rafters on the Wenatchee River
  31. 31. 34 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM PHOTOGRAPHSCOURTESYDAKOTACOLUMBIAHOUSEBOATADVENTURES downstream to find another convergence— the Snake, mingling with the Columbia at the Tri-Cities in Washington Wine Country. It’s from here that I’m heading on a jet boat trip early one morning, setting out from the Columbia Point Public Boat Launch in Richland on a powerful six- passenger boat. Captain Ray Hamilton of Columbia River Journeys tells me over the roar of the motor that we’re going to a wild river—the last free-flowing part of the Columbia, a section of the mighty river that Lewis and Clark never even floated upon. He and a handful of other captains take modern-day explorers out on the river May 1 through October 15, often on a larger 22-seat boat. Kids fishing from shore wave at us as we skim across the flat water, the glassy green river between us perfectly reflecting the bleached-blue sky above. Once we pass the last reminders of civilization—houses, ranches, and green vineyards—Captain Ray pushes the throttle down as far as it goes and a pair of white pelicans take off a hundred yards away, their black-rimmed wings carrying them high overhead. Soon the character of the river changes, the glassy water giving way to the ripples and whorls of a faster current. A little more than 20 miles upstream from town, we arrive at the Hanford Reach National Monument, a 196,000-acre reserve establishedin2000aroundthenuclearreac- tors built here from the ’40s to the ’60s—the first in the world. Six of the nine reactors are “cocooned,” stripped down to their essen- tial bits and encased in angular cement and gleaming stainless steel to become strangely stunning modern art pieces. The town of Hanford and all of the reac- tors are on the south side of the river, while the north is flanked for the most part by the White Bluffs, 900-foot-tall cliffs made of layers upon layers of compressed sand and clay speckled with swallows’ nests. The cap- tain adds in history lessons along the way, but other than that, it’s just a glorious ride on the river—the sky and the land feel wide open as we race across the water. SOON ENOUGH, summer’s almost over and I’m chasing the sun out east with my dad and two family friends at Seven Bays Marina in Davenport (35 miles from Spokane), heading out on a houseboating expedition. At Dakota Columbia House- boat Adventures’ dock, we meet owner Lyle Parker and our boat, the mighty Eclipse. I’m a little surprised they’re letting me take this giant vessel—it’s 62 feet long and 16 feet wide, sleeps 16, and looks a lot like an RV perched on top of two huge metal pontoons—out on the lake, but after a thor- ough briefing sprinkled with lots of “fores” and “afts,” I’m confidently houseboating on Lake Roosevelt, the 150-mile-long lake created by the Grand Coulee Dam. We set out for Hawk Creek, just four miles south of the marina, and arrive as the light starts to fade. Once we anchor to the shore, we settle into our new digs—on go the hot tub and the rooftop grill. By the From left: houseboats on Lake Roosevelt; a skier pilots an air chair ONCE WE ANCHOR TO THE SHORE, WE SETTLE INTO OUR NEW DIGS—ON GO THE HOT TUB AND THE ROOFTOP GRILL.
  32. 32. 36 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM PHOTOGRAPHLEFTBYMICHAELHANSON,RIGHTBYCOLUMBIARIVERKEEPER the giant buoy out in the bay. Alki Kayak Tours offers guided paddles (SUP or kayak) in both directions from the shop—west toward the lighthouse or east into Elliott Bay, which is where we’re headed. The afternoon sun is still reaching over the bluff of West Seattle as we sidle up to a derelict pier, dropping to our knees to fit underneath and poke through the mussel- and barnacle-covered pylons. The water is shockingly clear—I can see brilliantly col- ored sea stars and anemones clinging to long-fallen beams and boards below. Back out in the bay, we loop behind a docked barge to investigate moored vessels. Huge, gentle waves from the ferries, water taxis, and ships roll underneath us as we head toward Harbor Island and the mouth of the Duwamish for a peek at the heavy-duty industry afoot here. As we turn back toward the beach, giant egg-yolk jellyfish pass harmless and grace- ful beneath us. “Every time I come out to the water, I feel so lucky to live here,” Heidi says. Savoring the setting sun over the moun- tains ahead and the salt water below me—recalling my delight surfing the waves out in Westport and riding the white water in the Cascades—I couldn’t agree more. From left: stand-up paddling on Lake Union; kayaking at Hanford Reach National Monument time our burgers are finished, the tub is warm, so we soak under the stars before finding our cozy berths. In the morning we plug in the coffee maker, watch the news on the satellite TV, and scramble eggs on the gas range, reveling in the strangeness (and awesomeness) of floating-amenity abundance. After breakfast, it’s out to our kayaks to paddle up the arm of Hawk Creek, where the beaches give way to steep basalt walls and, beneath us, pretty, leafy stalks reach up through the crystalline water. A 30-minute paddle ends with an impressive waterfall tucked into a little cove—“Jurassic Park,” Dakota Columbia owner Lyle calls it. Over the course of the day, we figure out what houseboating is all about. It’s not about covering ground, seeing as the max speed is a whopping eight miles per hour; it’s about finding the perfect place to park it and play. We score a pretty spot to beach ourselves, then run up to the houseboat roof to zing off the slide, splashing in the aqua- marine water. Our trip is over after another day, but most folks come for at least a week—packing the boat full of people and provisions for a unique exploration of this corner of the state. BACK IN SEATTLE on one of the last sweet, sunny days of the season, I’m gearing up for an afternoon of stand-up paddleboarding. There are a number of places in Puget Sound where I can test my balance on the water—Lake Union in Seattle and Thea Foss Waterway in Tacoma, for example—but West Seattle is where I’m headed for a SUP lesson with Heidi, a guide with Alki Kayak Tours. She helps me choose a big, wide board that should keep me steady, and we set off from the beach to a chorus of sea lions, barking from EVERY TIME I COME OUT TO THE WATER, I FEEL SO LUCKY TO LIVE HERE. BOOK YOUR TRIP Alki Kayak Tours kayakalki.com, Columbia River Journeys columbiariverjourneys.com, Dakota Columbia Houseboat Adventures dakotacolumbia. com, Osprey Rafting ospreyrafting.com, San Juan Classic Day Sailing sanjuanclassicdaysailing.com, Steepwater Surf Shop steepwatersurfshop.com
  33. 33. Romance, Culture, Entertainment, and Recreation Experience this waterfront jewel of the Kitsap Peninsula situated on the shores of scenic Hood Canal. portgamble.com 360-297-8074 AmericasBestValueInn.com 888-315-2378 *Offers & discounts are subject to availability and may be cancelled at any time. Details at AmericasBestValueInn.com or visit an Americas BestValue Inn. © 2014Vantage Hospitality Group Inc. Download our free App Free Value Club* Instant Rewards Save 15% on Future Stays, Room Upgrade, Late Check-Out & More! Free Internet, Continental Breakfast & HBO at most of our 1,000 Inns, Hotels & Suites in North America We’ve Got You Covered® The Best Value on the Road • Edmonds • Lakewood • Seatac • Tukwila • Walla Walla With 105 beautiful hotel rooms and suites, a luxury spa, headline entertainment, 9 diverse dining options and exciting gaming, why go anywhere else? EXPERIENCE IT ALL UNDER ONE ROOF N BC, CANADA WA, USAPEACE ARCH Ferndale EXIT 260 Bellingham Seattle EXPERIENCEEVERYTHING Events subject to change without notice. Must be 21 or over to play. Management reserves all rights. ©2014 Silver Reef Casino I-5 Exit 260 • 4 Min. West • Haxton Way at Slater Road • Ferndale, WA 24/7 ACTION SilverReefCasino.com (866) 383-0777
  34. 34. SASQUATCH! MUSIC FESTIVAL 2013 AT THE GORGE AMPHITHEATRE IN GEORGE, WA 38 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM PHOTOGRAPHBYMATTHEWTHOMPSON/COURTESYKEXP
  35. 35. WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 39 FEST BY NORTH WEST Catch a set by the next Nirvana or Jimi Hendrix in a seriously jaw-dropping setting. By LAURA D. REDMAN
  36. 36. 40 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM The circumstances vary—be it a cold beer with your favorite drummer after a par- ticularly thrashing set or a jam session with Miles Davis, back from the dead— but the dream is the same, and seemingly unattainable for us mere mortals. We resign ourselves to following our favorite bands on Twitter. But you cross the border into Washing- ton state, and all of a sudden musicians are real people. Dave Matthews lives and grocery-shops in a quiet Seattle neigh- borhood. Mike McCready, lead guitarist for Pearl Jam, makes appearances at fund-raisers and plays backup for fledg- ling rockers. Hip-hop star Macklemore shoots music videos at Value Village and Dick’s Drive-In—but here, he goes by Ben. Just Ben. Even before an Aberdeen boy named Kurt Cobain started playing raucous concerts at Evergreen State College, Washington’s music scene was uniquely accessible. Far from the spotlight of New York or Los Angeles, people stay humble, honor their roots, and make music that’s both authentic and inspired. The native sound has morphed over the years. Jackson Street jazz of the 1940s and ’50s gave way to Northwest garage rock, with the Kingsmen’s “Louie Louie” as the unofficial anthem. (In fact, the song is still played during the seventh-inning stretch at Seattle Mari- ners games.) Jimi Hendrix shredded into the early ’70s, before things got funkier (Kenny G) and punkier (Heart). The ’90s brought a little thing called grunge and riot grrrl; a new century delivered a new genre, indie rock, and its Bellingham- bred ambassadors Death Cab for Cutie; and today, hip-hop and indie-folk rule the region. The best part? Washington boasts so many kinds of concert venues—from natural open-air amphitheaters to his- toric sites—musicians want to play here. They want to explore the Columbia River Valley just as badly as the rest of us do. That’s why it’s possible to go for a run along a dusty riverside trail at the Gorge and happen upon a few gentlemen out MANY OF US, AT ONE POINT OR ANOTHER, HAVE ASPIRED TO PARTY WITH A ROCK STAR. for a walk. You may strike up a conver- sation; they may invite you back to their bus to hang out. They might, just might, be Mumford and Sons, the world’s big- gest indie-folk band. (True story.) So: How to make your own rock-star dream a reality? Begin by exploring Washington’s best music festivals, held in some of the most varied and visually stunning destinations in the state—where even the musicians come out to play.
  37. 37. WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 41 KING GORGE Sasquatch! Music Festival May 23–25, July 4–6; the Gorge Amphithe- atre, George; sasquatchfestival.com Carved into basalt cliffs high above the Columbia River in central Washington, a natural amphitheater—is the sort of venue that draws music pilgrims from around the world. The sun sets behind the stage, spreading its hazy late-day glow over the valley, the campgrounds, and desert landscape beyond. For more than a decade, Sasquatch! Music Festival has been the high point of the Gorge’s annual lineup: a Memorial Day weekend celebration featuring some of the hippest acts in indie rock, hip- hop, pop, comedy, electronic, and more. Everyone from Coldplay to the Pixies has done a tour at the Gorge, and 2013’s headliners—Mumford and Sons, Sigur Rós, the Postal Service, and Macklemore and Ryan Lewis—reflected both the fes- tival’s diversity and its commitment to Northwest artists. (Mack and Lewis and the Postal Service are homegrown.) One might say that, like its namesake, Sasquatch has grown too big. Since its inception in 2002, the fest has gone from a single day to four, and tickets have con- sistently sold out within hours of release. This year festival organizers expanded the series to two separate three-day events—over Memorial Day and the Fourth of July weekends—with entirely different lineups. Outkast, Queens of the Stone Age, M.I.A., Neko Case, and the Violent Femmes are featured in May. Soundgarden, New Order, Shelby Earl, and Spoon are among those headlining July. Let it be known: everything’s bigger at the Gorge. INSIDER TIP General camping, which is included with a festival pass, can turn into a frat party. Find alternatives at tourgrantcounty.com. STREET BEATS Capitol Hill Block Party July 25–27; Union to Pine Streets between Broadway and 12th Avenues, Seattle; capitolhillblockparty.com We get older, but Capitol Hill Block Party stays the same age. One of Seattle’s urban music festivals consumes Pike and Pine streets—known to locals as the Pike- Pine corridor—for a weekend every July, with twentysomethings in fluorescent tank tops (and thirtysomethings look- ing pleasantly bewildered) rocking out to hip-hop, rock, and electronic music. It’s an all-afternoon, late-night event packing multiple venues in the city’s oh-so-hipster neighborhood. With a wristband, it’s easy to pop inside Neu- mos nightclub for a dance party, stumble back into the sunshine to catch a rising Seattle band at the Vera stage, grab a cold beverage at a beer garden, and claim ter- ritory for the nighttime headliner, be it Fitz and the Tantrums, the Flaming Lips, or Girl Talk (some of past years’ main attractions). Relive the days when you, too, could rock and roll all night. INSIDER TIP Some of the biggest names play a session in Caffé Vita or Barboza, Neumos’s basement bar, capacity 200. ROCKING PANORAMAS Left: Macklemore and Ryan Lewis and Elvis Costello play at Sasquatch! Music Festival 2013. Right: Confetti falls on the crowd, and Purity Ring takes the stage at Capitol Hill Block Party 2013. PHOTOGRAPHSCLOCKWISEFROMTOP:DAVIDCONGER,SUZIPRATT, DAVIDLICHTERMAN/COURTESYKEXP,MORGANSCHULER/COURTESYKEXP
  38. 38. 42 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM door Music Festival (July 24–26) launched last summer, drawing bands and singer- songwriters from all over the country to a park in Carnation. Bikes and beards were prominent, as were outdoor activities like astronomy talks, giving the whole experi- ence an “adult summer camp” vibe, per event organizer Kevin Sur. ISLAND VIBES Doe Bay Fest Aug 7–11; Doe Bay Resort, Olga, Orcas Island; doebayfest.com Even as Sasquatch expands to two week- ends and Capitol Hill Block Party picks up more corporate beer sponsors, one Northwest festival refuses to grow big- ger than its hiking boots: Doe Bay Fest. Every summer for the past six years, fans of Northwest music—be it indie rock and soul or hip-hop and Americana—have been sneaking off to Orcas Island in the San Juan Islands for a weekend stay at a 38-acre waterfront resort. Ticket hold- ers and musicians alike pitch tents, hike, walk the beach, and strum guitars around a campfire. Yes, there is an actual stage and schedule, but impromptu con- certs may also happen along a trail in the woods. Barriers between audience and artist are completely down—it’s like everyone’s on vacation. Recent documentary Welcome to Doe Bay bore the tagline “the best festival you’ve never heard of.” Not any lon- ger. The weekend consistently sells out months in advance. But rather than add tickets or days to the festival, talent orga- nizers Artist Home have decided to create a new fest in the same spirit. Timber! Out- INSIDER TIP Artist Home launched a winter music festival—Timbrrr!—in Leaven- worth this January that pairs skiing, snowboarding, and live music from the likes of Hey Marseilles, Telekinesis, and Radiation City. DOE BAY FEST TIMBER! OUTDOOR MUSIC FESTIVAL PHOTOGRAPHSBYJASONNEUERBURG
  39. 39. 44 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM Brandi Carlile. Look, don’t touch. June–Aug; Woodland Park Zoo, 5500 Phinney Ave N, Seattle; zoo.org/zootunes OLYMPIC MUSIC FESTIVAL In the summer, the best place to hear classical music isn’t a symphony hall; it’s a century-old dairy farm barn on the Olympic Peninsula. Members of the Philadelphia String Quartet launched the chamber music series in 1984, and 30 years on wafts of Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet or Beethoven’s violin sonatas drift out to people seated on hay bales. Weekends, June 28–Sept 7; 7360 Center Rd, Quilcene; olympicmusicfestival.org MARYHILL WINERY CONCERTS Winery concerts are all the rage here, but Maryhill has some of the best views (the carved bluffs of the Columbia River Gorge) and concert lineups (Bob Dylan, Hall and Oates, and Willie Nelson for the nostalgia seekers out there) in the state. Plus, there’s wine. June–Sept; Maryhill Winery, 9774 Hwy 14, Goldendale; maryhillwinery.com JUNE ELKFEST Now in its 10th year, this outdoor indie-rock festival is the pride of Spokane. It draws more than 10,000 people to the streets of Browne’s Addition, the home of the city’s late- 1800s elite. Don’t let the ’hood’s tony past fool you. Elkfest is a down-to-earth, all-ages party with top talent from Seattle to Spokane (and sometimes beyond). June 6–8; The Elk Public House, 1931 W Pacific Ave, Spokane; wedonthaveone. com/the-elk/elkfest MUSIC ON THE MOUNTAIN A concert series at 4,314 feet would be cool enough, but this one overlooks the ashy (and active) Mount St. Helens volcano, whose crater turns shades of pink and purple as the sun dips down below the horizon. MAY JUAN DE FUCA FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS Named for the strait sepa- rating the state from Canada, this international music and arts festival includes a multistage, multi- day concert series. Past acts include the bhangra-meets- Celtic rock of Delhi 2 Dublin and Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars. May 22–26; Vern Burton Memorial Commu- nity Center, 308 E Fourth St, Port Angeles; jffa.org JUNE–SEPTEMBER CHATEAU STE. MICHELLE SUMMER CONCERTS Start the evening inside a French-style chateau at the state’s oldest winery, pick up a bottle of Ethos Reserve cabernet sauvignon or Ries- ling (or both), then take your liquid picnic to the sloping lawn, where a chilled-out crowd reclines on the grass as artists—be it Allen Stone or Sarah McLachlan—play on. June–Sept; Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, 14111 NE 145th St, Woodinville; ste-michelle.com ZOOTUNES Concerts at a zoo? Sounds exotic. It’s not like you’re elbowing camels for a seat, but the outdoor shows on the lawn at Woodland Park Zoo are a great place to bring the kids to see Huey Lewis and the News or June 28, July 26, August 30; Johnston Ridge Observatory Amphitheater, 24000 Spirit Memorial Lake Hwy, Toutle; facebook.com/musicon themnt JULY BELLINGHAM FESTIVAL OF MUSIC Cruise ships idle in the back- ground as chamber players entertain on two days of this 15-day virtuoso orchestra festival. Among this year’s lineup are violinist Stefan Jackiw, the Calidore String Quartet, and internationally acclaimed soprano Joanna Mongiardo. July 5–20; West- ern Washington University, 516 High St, Bellingham; bellinghamfestival.org WINTHROP RHYTHM AND BLUES FESTIVAL It’s hard to believe anyone actually has the blues at this annual festival, nestled in the North Cascades on the banks of the Methow River. Kids play in streams, parents make camp with peace flags flying, and national artists— even Bo Diddley in the past— get down to the serious business of jamming. July 18–20; The Blues Ranch, 19190 Hwy 20, Winthrop; winthropbluesfestival.com JAZZ PORT TOWNSEND One of the nation’s oldest jazz workshops culminates with a series of live perfor- mances in a state park (Fort Worden) perched above the Strait of Juan de Fuca—and later at night in intimate venues throughout town. July 20–27; centrum.org/ programs/jazz AUGUST SUMMER MELTDOWN Nestled between a lazy river and glacier-capped moun- tains, Whitehorse Mountain Amphitheater is home to the Darrington Bluegrass Festi- val (July 18–20) and, more recently, Summer Meltdown, a three-day camping-and- music festival with more than 30 bands—think everyone from Bobby Fearon to the Shook Twins. Aug 7–10; Whitehorse Mountain Amphitheater, 42501 SR 530 NE, Darrington; summermeltdownfest.com BUMBERSHOOT The granddaddy of Seattle music and arts festivals returns every Labor Day weekend to Seattle Center, with three straight days of concerts (Death Cab for Cutie, fun., and Heart headlined last summer), comedy, theater, lectures on fan fiction, art exhibits, short films, and “spectacles.” Aug 30–Sept 1; Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St, Seattle; bumbershoot.org SEPTEMBER DECIBEL FESTIVAL Now in its 11th year, the electronic music festival draws artists from around the globe, many whose names don’t have vowels (like XXYYXX and MNDR). It also boasts big-deal DJs such as Amon Tobin and eye-popping stage shows that double as the art of illumination. Sept 24–28; various concert venues, Seattle; dbfestival.com MORE MUSIC, MORE VIEWS BUMBERSHOOT DAVID BYRNE AND ST. VINCENT AT CHATEAU STE. MICHELLE PHOTOGRAPHSFROMTOP:CHRISTOPHERNELSON,KIRKSTAUFFER
  40. 40. Must See-Must Do Washington Tours & Attractions CANOPY TOURS NORTHWEST Our tour features 6 ziplines, two beautiful trails, a log bridge, and a dramatic 54-foot final rappel! Zip through the trees viewing the forest from a whole new perspective. Camano Island, 360-387-5807 canopytoursnw.com FREE BOAT RIDES every Sunday at THE CENTER FOR WOODEN BOATS in Seattle, where maritime history comes alive and admission is free. 10% off all row boat rentals with the code: WOODBOAT. 1010 Valley St. Seattle, 206-382-2628, cwb.org NORTH CASCADES INSTITUTE offers programs that share the natural and cultural history of the region, including guided tours, family getaways, art retreats and backcountry adventures. 360-854-2599 ncascades.org History abounds at the NORTHWEST CARRIAGE MUSEUM. Visit one of the finest collections of 19th century carriages, buggies, wagons and historic artifacts in the country. Interactive exhibits for all ages. Group tours available. 314 Alder St, Raymond WA 360-942-4150, nwcarriagemuseum.org Open all year round, the VETERANS MEMORIAL MUSEUM has over 85 dis- play cases of artifacts from the Revolution- ary War to modern day. 2014 July 12-13 is our huge Civil War Battle and July 31-Aug 3 hosting the Vietnam Traveling Wall. Come visit us on I-5 at Exit 77. Chehalis, 360-740-8875, veteransmuseum.org GLIDER-RIDES.COM. Soar like a bird in our Grob motorized glider. See Snoqualmie Falls from above. Shoot pictures from an open window. Take the controls and experience flight in all its glory. Book now for an experience of a life- time. FAA-certified pilot. In Renton near SeaTac, 800-734-3588, glider-rides.com TOURUSA MOTORCYCLE RENTALS AND TOURS Experience the Pacific Northwest by riding though it! Choose a street, touring or adventure motorcycle. For a weekend or a full tour, enjoy the time spent between destinations. Guided and Self-Guided tour assistance avail- able. 888-627-3682, TourUSA.us MYSTIC SEA CHARTERS Come aboard the classic 100 ft. Mystic Sea for our guar- anteed whale watch and wildlife cruise and enjoy a fun and relaxing day on the water. Gray whale watching—Langley, WA: March 8–May 18. Orca whale watching— Anacortes, WA: May 23–Oct 4. 800-308-9387, mysticseacharters.com WING LUKE MUSEUM OF THE ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN EXPERIENCE Discover Seattle through the stories, history and art of the Asian Pacific Ameri- can experience in the heart of Seattle’s Chinatown-International District. Guided neighborhood & historic hotel tours. Seattle, 206-623-5124, wingluke.org NORTHWEST RAILWAY MUSEUM Just 2 miles from Snoqualmie Falls! Historic depot and exhibits daily, 10am– 5pm. Tours of Railway History Center and train excursions weekends, April–Oct and holidays. Experience how the railroad changed everything. Snoqualmie 425-888-3030, trainmuseum.org EDEN VALLEY GUEST RANCH & TRAIL RIDES Relax in Cabins with great views. Wi-Fi, Catering, Trail System for Hiking, Mt Biking & Horseback Trail Rides. Play Area, Child & Pet Friendly, Car Accessible. Many Activities. 10-miles E. of Oroville. Reservations: 509-485-4002, edenvalleyranch.net MOLSON SCHOOLHOUSE MUSEUM Centennial Celebration 2014. Open Daily in Summer 10am–5pm OLD MOLSON GHOST TOWN MUSEUM Full-scale historic buildings on 5-acres. Kids love it. Daylight hours April–Oct. Oroville, 509-485-3292, orovillewashington.com; molsonmuseum.org The 4 million volt Tesla Coil throws 10 foot arcs of lightning and is the star at- traction in the SPARK MUSEUM’S Mega- Zapper Electrical Show, every Saturday & Sunday at 2:30 p.m. 1312 Bay Street, Bellingham, WA, sparkmuseum.org or 360-738-3886 HYDROPLANE & RACEBOAT MUSEUM Feel the Thunder! Mention this ad and get two tickets for the price of one! For hours and directions visit: thunderboats.org Kent, 206-764-9453
  41. 41. visitseattle.org photo:NickHall Come discover what makes Seattle great.
  42. 42. Metro SeattleSEATTLE, TACOMA, AND PUGET SOUND PHOTOGRAPHBYARTAZUMANDIRIANASHIYAN/SHUTTERSTOCK WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 47 ELLIOTT BAY In the metro Seattle area, drift into a dreamy scene where cityscapes meet the wilds. Iconic attractions promise everything from soaring sights to flying fish. Public art and museums deliver stunning views around every corner, Washington State Ferries—the state’s top tourist attraction— ply the waters at several city edges, and eating global is the norm. Plus, outlets are a shop- per’s paradise and drinking local means not only tasting regional sips, but also seeing where they’re made.
  43. 43. GLACIER PEAK 48 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM Everett Mukilteo Marysville North Bend Snoqualmie Issaquah Bremerton Federal Way Fife Shelton Union Grand Mound Port Townsend Tulalip Stanwood Lacey Tumwater Yelm Poulsbo Gig Harbor Bellevue Renton Kent SeaTac Auburn Puyallup Graham Dupont Lakewood Sumner Enumclaw Eatonville Kirkland Redmond Lynnwood Edmonds Woodinville Bothell Snohomish Monroe Gold Bar Tacoma Olympia PUGET SOUND 5 90 5 405 520 16 512 507 510 161 7 3 2 530 167 522 203 410 18 101 CHESTER MORSE LAKE LAKE STEVENS Mt.Rainier National Park Granite Falls Darrington Arlington Skykomish Leavenworth BAINBRIDGE ISLAND VASHON ISLAND Fall City Carnation Newcastle N S EW 20 mi 1 METROSEATTLE MOUNTAIN LOOP HWY 1 2 5 4 3 6 1 EDMONDS This historic community may have roots in lum- ber, but Edmonds circa now is all about quaint, small-town charm. Its strollable downtown brims with vintage street lamps, cafes, and boutiques—plus a water- front featuring fishing off the pier, a 27-acre underwater dive park, and the bustling ferry terminal connecting Edmonds to Kingston. 2 SNOHOMISH Known as the Antique Capital of the North- west—specialty shops, art galleries, and sweet cafes pack downtown— Snohomish takes its history seriously. Homes display the year they were built, and the Sno- homish Historic District in the center of town is on the National Register of Historic Places. 3 GOLD BAR Little Gold Bar cele- brates its mining heyday with July’s Gold Dust Days, which includes a parade, live music, and vendors selling all things that glitter. Just outside of town is Wallace Falls—actually nine falls in all, with the grandest being 265 feet tall and worth the five- mile round-trip hike. 4 CARNATION Situated between the Tolt and Snoqualmie Riv- ers, Carnation is right in the heart of U-pick berry paradise. Miller’s Mer- cantile—part gift shop, part community event space—brings the farm- land vibe into town with giant sunflowers painted across its facade. Tolt- MacDonald Park on the edge of town is another treat. A suspension bridge sways to the other side of the Sno- qualmie, transporting brave crossers to a little bit of paradise. 5 FALL CITY Once a mill town out in farm country, Fall City is now a scenic 2,000- person burg with a mind to preserve its heritage. The historical society has already saved a 130-year-old hop shed, and the lodgelike Last Frontier Saloon proudly pours beers on the spot where Fall City’s trading post was built in 1869. 6 NORTH BEND Made famous by the TV show Twin Peaks, North Bend is a sweet little town at the foot of Mount Si, a popular hiking destination. After conquering the 4,167-foot peak, drop by Twede’s Cafe for a slice of cherry pie and a coffee à la Special Agent Dale Cooper. Two blocks away, the Sno- qualmie Valley Historical Museum showcases the non-Hollywood history of the area. 7 VASHON A 20-minute ferry ride from West Seattle transports travelers to a place far removed from city life, where farms still surround the tiny center of com- merce, bikes wait for their owners unlocked, and everyone knows everyone at the cheery summer farmers mar- ket. The island is ringed with rocky beaches and laced with curvy roads through wooded wonderlands—plenty of room for adventure. —ANNE LARKIN Small Towns 6 7 Stevens Pass WALLACE FALLS Seattle WANDER HERE • Alpental; Summit at Snoqualmie; Stevens Pass (p. 16) • Harmon Brewing; Rachel’s Ginger Beer; Sodo Spirits; Sun Liquor; 3 Howls Distill- ery (p. 17) • Sound to Narrows; Sea- fair Torchlight; Seattle Marathon (p. 17) • Woodinville (p. 17) • Antiques at Pike Place; Seattle Antiques Market (p. 20) • Tillicum Village (p. 22) • Port Susan Snow Goose and Birding Festival; Puget Sound Bird Fest (p. 22) • Bumbershoot; Capitol Hill Block Party (p. 38) EXPLORE
  44. 44. WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 49 ART MEETS NATURE REGIONAL TASTES Art & Craft The South Sound’s “legacy of honest hard work” resonates in every sip from Wing- man Brewers (wingmanbrewers.com), a 2011 start-up that’s already upgraded to a taproom across from Tacoma Dome Station. Its theme salutes the World War II service of head brewer Ken Thoburn’s grandfather, who painted designs on mili- tary fuselages. Today, Wingman’s logo, a pinup girl behind an airplane gauge, keeps alive the area’s can-do spirit. This cleverness is echoed around Wash- ington, which ranks eighth among states in craft breweries per capita and brews up a good chunk of the nation’s $10.2-billion small-batch suds industry. Sample the region’s success in Tacoma’s first craft brewery: Harmon Brewing Co. (harmonbrewingco.com). Or head to Pint Defiance (pintdefiance.com), a new bottle shop that has 50 feet of craft beers, meads, and ciders for sale, as well as tap offer- ings like Test Pilot IPA from Kent’s Airways Brewing Co. (airwaysbrewing.com). Ten miles southeast, connoisseurs can savor Puyallup’s DUO (duobrewing.com) Poles Apart milk stout and Powerhouse (powerhousebrewpub.com) Amperage Amber in an electrical substation that’s one of the West’s top brewpubs. In Graham, lift a glass of Dark Marc ale to the M.T. Head Brewing Company’s (mtheadbrewingco.com) fifth year of turning out boutique barrels under the watchful gaze of Mount Rainier. But the area doesn’t just excel at arti- sanal beer. Vintners have opened shop in Lakewood (Stina’s Cellars, stinas cellars.com) and on Vashon Island (Palouse Winery, palousewinery.com), among others, keeping the South Sound’s spirit of innovation burning bright. —AMANDA CASTLEMAN OLYMPIC SCULPTURE PARK PHOTOGRAPHLEFTBYBENJAMINBENSCHNEIDER,RIGHTCOURTESYWINGMANBREWERS WASHINGTONIANS LOVE TO LIVE and play outdoors, so it’s no surprise that our cities are studded with dazzling sculptures and alfresco art. World-renowned glass sculptor Dale Chihuly—whose pieces have been featured in 200-plus museum collections around the globe—has threaded countless masterpieces into the rugged beauty of the Pacific Northwest. In his hometown of Tacoma, find 2,364 vibrant glass forms suspended overhead, two 40-foot-tall block towers glimmering in blue, and a display case filled with 109 whimsical sculptures on the Chihuly Bridge of Glass, a 500-foot-long pedestrian overpass leading to the Museum of Glass (museumofglass.org). The maestro’s work is also juxtaposed with nature under the towering Space Needle in Seattle at Chihuly Garden and Glass (chihulygardenandglass.com). Wend down paths lined with camellias and daylilies to happen upon works like Reeds on Logs, cobalt-blue glass rods that rise like giant candles out of the ground. Elsewhere in Seattle, public art abounds. In Capitol Hill’s Volunteer Park (seattle. gov/parks), Isamu Noguchi’s circular Black Sun frames views of the distant Space Needle and Olympic Mountains. Other works become an interactive cornerstone of neighborhood culture (Fremont residents often dress up the cast aluminum figures of Richard Beyer’s Waiting for the Interurban), while downtown’s water- front Olympic Sculpture Park (seattleartmuseum.org) features 21 permanent outdoor pieces, ranging from Alexander Calder’s abstract Eagle to Louise Bourgeois’s fountain-engulfed Father and Son. About 42 pieces are on display in downtown Bellevue—includ- ing a life-size bronze statue of Mahatma Gandhi outside the public library—plus additional temporary works during the bien- nial sculpture exhibition Bellwether. In Snohomish County, around 40 murals and sculptures by regional artists are sprinkled throughout downtown Edmonds and along the Puget Sound coastline. Visitors can also admire James Madison’s 15-foot-tall Tulalip People aluminum sculpture, which pays hom- age to the region’s Native culture with its fish-ladder effect, in Stanwood. State capital Olympia boasts some 27 pieces of alfresco art with waterfront park Percival Landing serving as a major hub. Within less than a mile, find 17 sculptures made from cast bronze to mosaic tiles to found objects on this promenade that might as well be considered a museum without walls. —CORINNE WHITING WINGMAN BREWERS TRIP TIP Pick up a free art map at each city’s visitor infor- mation center.
  45. 45. 50 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM LOCAL SIPS Pour Across the Sound The Seattle area may be best known for its coffee—think java titans like Starbucks, with its original Pike Place Market loca- tion, microroasters like Middle Fork (middleforkroasters.com), or Bainbridge Island’s Storyville (storyville.com), now also in Pike Place Market—but beverages are booming beyond the bean. Beer is big here. Standards and sea- sonals from pioneers such as Pike BrewingCompany(pikebrewing.com)and Elysian Brewing (elysianbrewing.com) are mainstays at taphouses like Brouw- er’s Cafe (brouwerscafe.blogspot.com), funeral-parlor-turned-beer-bar Pine Box (pineboxbar.com), and the dog-friendly Beveridge Place Pub (beveridgeplace pub.com). Fremont Brewing Company (fremontbrewing.com) offers an outdoor year-round beer garden, while nearby Odin Brewing (odinbrewing.wordpress. com) focuses on food and beer pairings. Outside Seattle, nanobrewery Foggy Noggin (foggynogginbrewing.com) pro- duces English-style ales in a Bothell garage, Redmond’s Black Raven Brewing (blackravenbrewing.com) is racking up acclaim for its distinct brews and neigh- borhood taproom, and Woodinville’s Triplehorn Brewing (triplehornbrewing. com) recently celebrated a first anniver- sary. Down the hill is Redhook Brewery (redhook.com), home to multiple seasonal ale fests and summer “Moonlight Cinema” on a 55-foot inflatable screen on its lawn. What Woodinville is best known for, however,iswine.Theareaishometotasting rooms for 100 wineries, including Cha- teau Ste. Michelle (ste-michelle.com) and nearby wineries Novelty-Hill and Januik (noveltyhilljanuik.com), both by “master of Merlot” Mike Januik. By the landmark Hollywood Schoolhouse, wineries like Mark Ryan Winery (markryanwinery. com), J. Bookwalter (bookwalterwines. com),andBrian Carter Cellars (briancarter cellars.com) pour distinctly Washington juice. A few miles north is the warehouse district, with more than 50 wineries, including locals Baer Winery (baerwinery. com) and Sparkman Cellars (sparkman cellars.com), and eastern Washington’s Obelisco Estate (obelisco.com) and Kestrel Vintners (kestrelwines.com). Back in Seattle, Seattle Cider Company (seattlecidercompany.com)—the city’s first cidery since Prohibition—recently opened alongside brewery Two Beers (twobeers brewery.com), although Vashon Island’s Dragon’s Head Cider (dragonsheadcider. com) has been around since 2010. With the legalization of liquor pro- duction in Washington, distilleries with tasting rooms have been popping up. Seattle’s SoDo district is home to the enor- mous new Westland Distillery (westland distillery.com) and Glass Distillery (glass distillery.com); Interbay has craft dis- tillers Batch 206 (batch206.com) and Sound Spirits (drinksoundspirits.com); and Fremont Mischief Distillery (fremont mischief.com) makes John Jacob rye whiskey. Woodinville’s Soft Tail Spirits (softtailspirits.com) has been revitalizing grappa since 2008, while Project V Distill- ery (projectvdistillery.com) distills vodka and sells frozen house-made sausages. JANUIK PHOTOGRAPHCOURTESYJANUIK 1 METROSEATTLE The Convergence Zone—Edmonds to Arlington—gets a whip of wind crossing the Puget Sound from the Olympic Moun- tains. It’s also getting a taste of another natural force: beer. Edmonds’sAmericanBrewing(american brewing.com) is proud owner of the Breakaway India pale ale. Mukilteo’s Diamond Knot Craft Brewing (diamond knot.com) has four locations around the Sound, and Skookum Brewery (skookumbrewing.com) recently relin- quished a backwoods brewpub for a bold warehouse and taproom in Arling- ton. Humble Norm’s Market (10027 Lundeen Park Way) in Lake Stevens has more than 50 rotating kegs made for growler fills. Nine miles down Machias Road, Snohomish’s Trails End Taphouse (trailsendcatering.com) tenders 28 beers on draft. Everett’s champion of beer has long been waterfront microbrewery Scuttle- butt (scuttlebuttbrewing.com), but new players are making a mark. Nanobrewery Middleton Brewing (middletonbrewing. net) has a taproom full of proprietary brews as well as rotating suds from the likes of local newbie Justice Brewing (justicebrewing.com). Take one to go at Lynnwood’s Special Brews (special-brews. com), an extensive bottle shop with more than 1,000 bottles and 15 draft picks, or DIY at Gallagher’s Where-U-Brew (whereubrew.com) in Edmonds, with recipes ranging from porters and lagers to semi-sweet cider. Wine gets its due in Bothell at Wild Vine Bistro (wildvinebistro.com), where happy hours feature $5 glass pours. Feeling lucky? Tulalip Resort Casino (tulalipresort casino.com) offers seven different restaurants and award-winning wine lists. Head to Snohomish distilleries Skip Rock (skiprockdistillers.com) for fruit liqueurs and Dark Moon (1830 Bickford Ave) for apple cider vodka, or to Everett’s Bluewater Organic Distilling (bluewater distilling.com) for the Halcyon gin. The next day, Velton’s Coffee (veltons coffee.com) Bonsai Blend espresso wakes upEverett,andVinaccioCofffee’s(vinaccio .com) Sumatran Mandehling roast gets the job done in Marysville. —ERIN JAMES TRIP TIP Map a tour at washington wine.org or washington beer.com.
  46. 46. WE CONNECT ART TO LIFE visitsam.org Photo: Catherine Anstett I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
  47. 47. 52 WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM CHIHULY BRIDGE OF GLASS AND MUSEUM OF GLASS OLD CAPITOL BUILDING PHOTOGRAPHBYMAHESHTHAPA EXPLORE Museum Day Museum of Glass Along with works from glass-art pioneer and Tacoma home- town hero Dale Chihuly, expect sculpted silica from as far as the Czech Republic and Ireland. museumofglass.org Seattle Art Museum Downtown’s big kid on the block offers a consistently stel- lar lineup of classic and modern works, from the colorful abstracts of Miró to dra- matic 17th-century European paintings. seattleartmuseum.org Bellevue Arts Museum Contemporary craft—including whimsical woodcarvings and life-size terra-cotta sculptures—popu- late this Eastside establishment, which highlights Pacific Northwest artists and global stars. bellevuearts.org Bigelow House Museum Though unas- suming, this two-story Carpenter Gothic home in Olympia is actually one of Wash- ington’s oldest remaining wood-frame houses. It’s on the National Register of Historic Places and features original fur- nishings and artifacts from its Oregon Trail–era owners. olympiahistory.org/wp Schack Art Center See and make art at this two-in-one creative hub in Everett, where galleries showcase regional talents and a hot-shop studio lets anyone—who passes orientation—try glassblowing. It also offers classes in everything from jewelry to painting. schack.org Done all these? In Seattle, check out pop culture at EMP Museum, the past at the Museum of History and Industry, Asian-American works at Wing Luke, or interactive exhibits at Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. To any itinerary in Tacoma, add the Tacoma Art Museum or classic autos at LeMay—America’s Car Museum. empmuseum.org; mohai.org; wingluke. org; gatesvc.org; tacomaartmuseum.org; lemaymuseum.org —ANGELA CABOTAJE ◆ 160 beautifully appointed guestrooms and suites ◆ Complimentary Internet Access ◆ Connected to Westlake Center, Seattle Monorail and Seattle’s Light Rail ◆ Specializing in meetings for 10 to 200 ◆ Award-Winning Restaurant Andaluca and Oliver’s Lounge 800-426-5100 mayflowerpark.com National Trust Historic Hotels of America 160 beautifully appointed guestrooms and suites SEATTLE’S PREMIER LOCATION SEE SEATTLE ON A WHOLE NEW LEVEL ENRICH YOUR PERSPECTIVE—WHETHER YOU’VE BEEN HERE FOR AN HOUR OR MORE THAN A DECADE. VIEW THE HIGHEST PUBLIC OBSERVATORY ON THE WEST COAST 360º HEIGHT 902´ FLOOR 73 LOCATED IN COLUMBIA CENTER, 701 FIFTH AVE | OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK* 10AM-8PM | SKYVIEWOBSERVATORY.COM *EXCLUDINGHOLIDAYSANDPRIVATEEVENTS. PHOTO:MIKEREID
  48. 48. Refresh V I S I T B E L L E V U E W A S H I N G T O N . CO M There’s an abundance of refreshing ways to experience Bellevue, Washington. Revive your wardrobe with a luxurious shopping experience. Invigorate your mind in our museums and art galleries. Savor some fine wine and world-class dining while exploring the city’s vibrant nightlife. Revel in the beauty of the Northwest at the area’s parks and premier golf courses.

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