O slideshow foi denunciado.
Seu SlideShare está sendo baixado. ×

Everything You Wanted to Know About Making Moz (And Some Stuff You Didn't)

Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio

Confira estes a seguir

1 de 137 Anúncio

Everything You Wanted to Know About Making Moz (And Some Stuff You Didn't)

Baixar para ler offline

When you’re a first-time everything, you don’t know how to do anything.

Sarah Bird, CEO of $30-million-dollar-a-year software company Moz, spills her guts about the challenges of her first time making a successful startup. From spontaneous bacon parties to arduous product launches, Sarah takes you through the highs and lows of working towards an audacious mission.

Learn about failure, friendship and building something bigger than yourself.

When you’re a first-time everything, you don’t know how to do anything.

Sarah Bird, CEO of $30-million-dollar-a-year software company Moz, spills her guts about the challenges of her first time making a successful startup. From spontaneous bacon parties to arduous product launches, Sarah takes you through the highs and lows of working towards an audacious mission.

Learn about failure, friendship and building something bigger than yourself.

Anúncio
Anúncio

Mais Conteúdo rRelacionado

Diapositivos para si (20)

Quem viu também gostou (20)

Anúncio

Semelhante a Everything You Wanted to Know About Making Moz (And Some Stuff You Didn't) (20)

Mais de Seattle Interactive Conference (20)

Anúncio

Mais recentes (20)

Everything You Wanted to Know About Making Moz (And Some Stuff You Didn't)

  1. 1. Making Everything You Ever Wanted To Know (And Some Stuff You Probably Didn’t) by Sarah Bird, CEO | @SarahBird | moz.com
  2. 2. Topics in this Presentation: What exactly is “Moz?” Sarah Bird: 1st Time… Everything Highs & Lows of Making Moz The Company’s Future Slides 6-20 Slides 21-32 Slide 33-120 Slides 121-136 These are so you can skip ahead when you’re browsing on your own or showing your friends ;-)
  3. 3. Transparent Authentic Generous Fun Empathetic Exceptional Hold me to it!
  4. 4. Moz Basics
  5. 5. On Advice
  6. 6. What is Moz exactly?
  7. 7. Moz Basics $30 million/year in total revenue
  8. 8. MMoozz BBaassicicss 140 talented team members
  9. 9. Moz Basics Over 25,000 paying customers From all over the globe.
  10. 10. History of Fast Growth
  11. 11. Lots of Awards N Shit Best Places to Work
  12. 12. Moz makes software that helps marketers understand and improve their SEO, social media, links and brand mentions.
  13. 13. It looks a little like this…
  14. 14. It looks a little like this… This is our flagship product, “Moz Analytics”
  15. 15. Confession: I hate marketing.
  16. 16. Confession: I hate marketing.
  17. 17. Marketing Obscures the truth Stops me from doing what I want to do Floods my inboxes without my permission Tries tell sell me on products I’ll never, ever need Doesn’t teach me anything Interrupts me during dinner Pollutes the scenery Asks first
  18. 18. The best marketing is… Transparent Authentic Generous Fun Empathetic Exceptional
  19. 19. The best marketing Educates me Is tailored to my interests Gives before It gets Is so good, I want to see it again and share it with friends Is the Scenery (rather than pollutes it) Appears when I’m looking for it Entertains me Is clear about what it can and cannot do for me
  20. 20. It’s not about the software. Moz empowers businesses to succeed by creating their best, most TAGFEE, marketing. …Making the world better for ourselves and everyone.
  21. 21. I’m a First Time Everything
  22. 22. How Most People See Me
  23. 23. How I Used to Feel Most of the Time
  24. 24. I used to be a cleaning lady.
  25. 25. Chains!
  26. 26. College Librarian
  27. 27. Studied Literature & Philosophy
  28. 28. So… Law school then!
  29. 29. Met Rand and Geraldine at a party!
  30. 30. On Your First Day Lawyering You Have To Lawyer!!!
  31. 31. Usually, I Make Decisions Like This..
  32. 32. This time, I Followed My Dreams… (literally)
  33. 33. Joined SEOmoz in 2007 To Work With Rand and Gillian
  34. 34. First Weeks At Moz Were Amazing.
  35. 35. Shit Got Real
  36. 36. No Effing Idea What We Were Doing.
  37. 37. First Board Meeting
  38. 38. Those Were the Droids I Was Looking For…
  39. 39. Second Board Meeting
  40. 40. Dear God…
  41. 41. Have I convinced you we had no idea what we were doing yet?
  42. 42. Don’t worry. We figured it out eventually.
  43. 43. Lots of great stuff happened in the early days too…
  44. 44. Who Am I
  45. 45. 2008: First Attempt At SEO Analytics What if we could track all of your SEO metrics over time? And graph them for you?
  46. 46. Why “SEO Analytics” Failed We used poorly understood third party data to make the product.
  47. 47. Why “SEO Analytics” Failed We used poorly understood third party data to make the product.
  48. 48. We decided to kill “SEO Analytics” 9 months after launch.
  49. 49. Dreaming Big in 2008 “Why is my competitor ranking there?”
  50. 50. I can see the keywords my competitors care about
  51. 51. I can see how bot friendly their site is.
  52. 52. But who is linking to them?
  53. 53. What if we could answer that?
  54. 54. Mission Accomplished: Linkscape Launched in 2008
  55. 55. You’ve got to be kidding me.
  56. 56. Today, we index 837+ billion links.
  57. 57. If you love data, set it free.
  58. 58. The Rise of APIs We can build faster We succeed when our competitors succeed Our metrics are the standard Make Money
  59. 59. Linkscape was the start of our product framework.
  60. 60. Product Success Pyramid™
  61. 61. Profit Product Success Pyramid™
  62. 62. Profit ??? Product Success Pyramid™
  63. 63. Profit ??? Product Success Collect Pyramid™ Underpants
  64. 64. Data Product Success Pyramid We need lots of high quality data to help marketers. Moz gets you ungettable data.
  65. 65. Insights Data Product Success Pyramid Insights point out next actions and save time.
  66. 66. Insights Data Product Success Pyramid Data, without insights, induces anxiety & creates an exclusive club of data gurus and subject matter experts.
  67. 67. Packaging Insights Data Product Success Pyramid Our customers are not all the same. Our technologies can be repackaged to deliver the best experience and value for each persona.
  68. 68. Moz is and always was a community first.
  69. 69. Rand blogged about learning SEO. It was a community, not a business.
  70. 70. Ever wondered... SEO = Search Engine Optimization Moz = Sharing/Open Source [dmoz, Mozilla]
  71. 71. From 15,000 visits/month in 2007 to 2,000,000/month today
  72. 72. Content is Co-Created and Curated
  73. 73. Practicing What We Preach
  74. 74. 800k marketers come to Moz to support each other, and try to become their best professional selves.
  75. 75. Come for the content. Stay for the Software.
  76. 76. The natives are digital.
  77. 77. We don’t have sales people. We have community managers.
  78. 78. Their job isn’t to sell.
  79. 79. It’s to foster an inclusive and generous environment to learn about marketing.
  80. 80. How Moz Makes Money
  81. 81. I hate asking for money.
  82. 82. I hate answering the phone.
  83. 83. Customers find our community through Google and social shares.
  84. 84. Customers find our community through Google and social shares.
  85. 85. They enjoy our free content. (Add screen cap of the DA learn SEO page)
  86. 86. And hopefully sign up for a free trial.
  87. 87. 85% of Moz free trials are from organic sources
  88. 88. The Moz subscription defaults to monthly, and starts at $99.
  89. 89. Signing up is easy!
  90. 90. Customer Lifetime Value (CLTV) is on the low end
  91. 91. Much Lower Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC)
  92. 92. Highest CLTV/CAC Ratio
  93. 93. We break even in 1.6 months
  94. 94. 1 - 2 Innovation Punch
  95. 95. 1 - 2 Innovation Punch Float like a butterfly.
  96. 96. Sting like a bee. 1 - 2 Innovation Punch
  97. 97. 1 - 2 Innovation Punch Technology innovation!
  98. 98. Business model 1 - 2 Innovation Punch innovation!
  99. 99. The First Time I Thought About Quitting.
  100. 100. Role Transitions
  101. 101. Lawsuit Episode
  102. 102. Even the leliattrlnein sg tSuEffO w. as hard.
  103. 103. TAGFEE saves the day!
  104. 104. The Second Time I Thought About Quitting
  105. 105. I can’t go on.
  106. 106. Fuck it.
  107. 107. That’s my job, yo.
  108. 108. Picard Wisdom
  109. 109. Dreaming Big in 2012-2013
  110. 110. We should build an SEO Analytics product!
  111. 111. Ugh. We biffed it.
  112. 112. Triple Face Palm For when the fail is so strong, reality starts acting up.
  113. 113. It’s not all bad! There’s a lot going right too
  114. 114. The brand is strong.
  115. 115. Better results for less money
  116. 116. Launching New Products
  117. 117. There is a lot more to do.
  118. 118. Moz is on this crazy journey.
  119. 119. It’s kinda like Star Trek.
  120. 120. “…To explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no one has gone before.”
  121. 121. “ …To empower businesses to succeed by creating their best, most TAGFEE, marketing.
  122. 122. Marketing is not getting any easier.
  123. 123. The web continues to fragment.
  124. 124. This is still Day One.
  125. 125. Realities of New Marketing Risks And about the Reality of SEO’s New Risks Penalty? Cannibalization? Drop in Demand? Technical Issue? Competition? New SERP Types?
  126. 126. Realities of SEO’s New Risks
  127. 127. “I learn by going where I have to go.” - Theodore Roethke, The Waking
  128. 128. There is a lot of work left to do. But hey, there’s a first time for everything.

Notas do Editor

  • Lots of people have helped make moz.

    I would be said if any of you left with the impression that this was something I did alone, or if you thought I was representing the ‘truth.’ This is my truth of what happened. Certainly others would have a different perspective.

    There are a lot of diferent perspectives, and all of them valuable.
  • Lots of people have helped make moz.

    I would be said if any of you left with the impression that this was something I did alone, or if you thought I was representing the ‘truth.’ This is my truth of what happened. Certainly others would have a different perspective.

    There are a lot of diferent perspectives, and all of them valuable.
  • Millions visit the website each month.
    800k people in our community from all over the world.
  • Millions visit the website each month.
    800k people in our community from all over the world.
  • Millions visit the website each month.
    800k people in our community from all over the world.
  • Millions visit the website each month.
    800k people in our community from all over the world.
  • Deloitte Fast 500
    Inc. 5000
    PS Business Journal to 50 Fastest Growing Companies
    Best Places to Work (PS Business Journal and Seattle Met)
    Geekwire: Startup Of the Year
    WTIA Award: Marketing Innovation
    WTIA Award: Commercial Product of the Year
    Geekwire: Perk of the Year
  • I believe the best marketing is

    Transparent

    Authentic

    Generous

    Empathetic

    Exceptional
  • We are working to build something important, something that matters to our customers, something that we can all tell our grandchildren about. Such things aren’t meant to be easy. We are incredibly fortunate to have this group of dedicated employees whose sacrifices and passion build Moz.
  • I’m a serendipitous entrepreneur. If you had told me 10 years ago, I’d be working in Tech. I would have said you’re crazy. If you had told me five years ago that I would be the CEO of a tech company, I would have said you’re crazy.

    I started as general counsel—then coo—then president—then CEO.

    I’ve made lots of mistakes.
    I’ve also not had the baggage of the past to hold me back.
  • I can't go on, I'll go on.
  • Education
  • Education
  • Mutual friend Kim Cozzetto.
  • Talk about my first day on the job.
  • You do NOT want to be with me when I have to pick out shampoo!
  • First Moz Hliday Party in 2007
  • We used to hug every time we came into the office. I was blogging. Everyone is great. And Smart. And Young. Kinda the opposite of law.
  • It was HARD. We didn’t know what we were doing. We just knew we hated bad marketing, we liked each other, and we wanted to be a heart-centered business. We didn’t want to be ass holes.
  • Rand and I would make decisions by roshambo if we couldn’t agree.
  • Used our mentors. Created mentors. Googled everything. Read a bunch of books on product development and on subscription businesses.
  • Family and Personal
  • Brand Data
    Google Brand Mentions - How many times your brand appears in Google's index
    Google Blog Mentions - How many times your brand appears in Google's Blogsearch
    Google News Mentions - How many times your brand appears in Google's News Service
    Google Web Mentions - How many times your domain name is mentioned across the web
    Link Data
    Yahoo! Site Explorer - Yahoo! Site Explorer's count of inbound links.
    Yahoo! Websearch  Links - Yahoo! Websearch's count of inbound links. We use both statistics from Site Explorer and Yahoo! Websearch, as the two can provide very different counts at times
    Technorati Links - The count of links from blogs tracked by Technorat
    Google Blogsearch Links - Number of links according to Google's Blogsearch
    Indexing Data
    Index count according to Google
    Index count according to Yahoo! Site Explorer
    Index count according Yahoo!
    Index count according to Live / MSN
    Index count according to Ask.com
  • If we had tested and validated the data ahead of time, we could have discovered these problems. And done a better job of curated and presenting the data.
  • And then we never spoke of it.
  • SEOs were asking: “Why is my competitor ranking there?”
    You could see for yourself what keywords they were targeting by looking at each page and source code. But you couldn’t see ‘off page’ factors like links.
  • I can figure out what keywords they are targeting.
  • I can figure out what keywords they are targeting.
  • But how do I know who is linking to them?
  • What if we found out for ourselves who was linking to who? And what if we could figure out which links were helping or hurting you?

    But we’d have to crawl the whole web to do that. And we don’t have Google’s infrastructure. (Thank you Amazon!)
  • We succeeded in launching our big data base of Links in 2008– 30 billion URLs. 1/4 Google scale for 1/100th the cost.

    We couldn’t have done this without AWS and some brilliant engineers.
  • October 6, 2008: The Dow closes below 10,000 for the first time since 2004.

    Highs and lows. This was both the same day!
  • We knew that in order for people to adopt this model, they’d have to use it in their work.

    If you love something set it free—We created a free and paid version of the API.
  • We knew that in order for people to adopt this model, they’d have to use it in their work.

    If you love something set it free—We created a free and paid version of the API.

    Ubiquity in our metrics
    Great relationships with “competitors” in our space.
    We can build faster
    More APIs and more coming…
  • You want to make profit.
  • Hands up
  • So you need a solid base of under pants
  • Garbage In, Garbage Out.

    Competitive data is a strategic piece of our offering and key competitive advantage. We don’t just tell you what’s happening on your site or with your content. What is your competitor doing? And should you care?
  • “Analytics is not reporting. It's not a static thing. It's an activity. It should point out next actions.” (stolen from portent )

    Data should point out next actions.

    Data without insight induces anxiety and creates an exclusive club of data gurus and subject matter expertise.

    Insights help everyone succeed by telling what is meaningful in the data.

    Time is money.
  • “Analytics is not reporting. It's not a static thing. It's an activity. It should point out next actions.” (stolen from portent )

    Data should point out next actions.

    Data without insight induces anxiety and creates an exclusive club of data gurus and subject matter expertise.

    Insights help everyone succeed by telling what is meaningful in the data.

    Time is money.
  • Customers are not all the same.

    They have different primary roles, purchasing power, and team dynamics.

    Our technologies can be repackaged to deliver the best experience and value for these different primary roles.
  • Think Dmoz.
    Mozilla
    Chefmoz

    Had a blog and added more community features
    --YouMoz
    --Q&A
    --Events Board
    -- Private Messaging
  • SEO requires quality content
  • They help create great content for their peers in the form of blog posts, comments (worth reading!), speaking events, and answering each others questions in our Q&A forum.
  • More digital natives Owning businesses, making purchasing decisions. They like to buy online. They have many online identities.
  • Their job isn’t to sell.
    It’s to foster an inclusive and generous environment to learn about marketing
  • Their job isn’t to sell.
    It’s to foster an inclusive and generous environment to learn about marketing
  • 1000 week.
  • 1000 week.
    We don’t buy email lists.
    We don’t have a single sales person on the team.
    We’re very careful with how we market to the community.
  • Because we can process a lot of data cheaply and acquire customers for very little cost, our business model is very rare.
  • Because we can process a lot of data cheaply and acquire customers for very little cost, our business model is very rare.
  • Because we can process a lot of data cheaply and acquire customers for very little cost, our business model is very rare.
  • Because we can process a lot of data cheaply and acquire customers for very little cost, our business model is very rare.
  • The 1-2 punch is simple:
    Punch 1: Technology Innovation
    Punch 2: Business Model Innovation
  • The 1-2 punch is simple:
    Punch 1: Technology Innovation
    Punch 2: Business Model Innovation
  • The 1-2 punch is simple:
    Punch 1: Technology Innovation
    Punch 2: Business Model Innovation
  • The 1-2 punch is simple:
    Punch 1: Technology Innovation
    Punch 2: Business Model Innovation
  • The 1-2 punch is simple:
    Punch 1: Technology Innovation
    Punch 2: Business Model Innovation
  • WHAT?! I never ever thought about firing you here. Not even for a second. I had your back so hard on this!!!
  • Even the little stuff was getting at us: The Commute Episode
  • Creation of TAGFEE
  • I can't go on, I'll go on.
  • I can't go on, I'll go on.
  • We still have challenges but I
    No longer even think about quitting!

    I’m excited by them!

    Why? Because I understand our Mission. And I know what I value. Those things are not at risk.

  • Launch was delayed.
    Launch took 9 months.
    It was unstable.
    Spent millions of dollars on contractors to help get us back on track—probably largely wasted.
    We blew the new user experience. Totally blew it.
    We focused too much on data, and not enough on insights. What do I do next?
    Dug into it way to late. We built in this very old skooly waterfall way that hid the problems.
    We did reviews, but we did them with our fan club.
  • Build agile. This will reveal the problems—you’ll still have them! But you’ll find them more quickly.
    Get feedback from people who are not friends and family.
  • The re-brand went amazing!
  • Cheaper COGs because of a move to build our own datacenters.
    And fewer people, working better together.
    Very few contractors.
  • It’s the wild west.

    Marketers still need help understanding the top of the funnel. It’s not getting easier. There is tremendous opportunity (both from marketing technology innovation and business model innovation) to create value for our customers and ourselves. Hat tip Bezos.

    Marketers still need help understanding the top of the funnel.

    The web is fragmenting.

    Mobile Technology.

    New screens.

  • http://www.adminreseau.fr/social-media-landscape-2013/
  • http://www.slideshare.net/randfish/the-seo-revolution-will-not-be-televised
  • Although the mission is clear, We don’t know the path it’s going to take. We’re discovering it as we go.
  • The mission is clear. We don’t know the path it’s going to take. We’re discovering it as we go.

    Motto of the Serendipitous Entrepreneur: “I learn by going where I have to go.” The Waking BY THEODORE ROETHKE
  • We’ve got new data sources to tackle. New scale. International markets. And someday, maybe being a public company.
  • http://www.adminreseau.fr/social-media-landscape-2013/

×