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Program outcomes and learning outcomes

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Program outcomes and learning outcomes

  1. 1. PROGRAM OUTCOMES AND LEARNING OUTCOMES BY: ROMMEL LUIS C. ISRAEL III
  2. 2. PROGRAM OUTCOMES AND STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
  3. 3. As a teacher, are you a content-centered? Or An outcomes-centered?
  4. 4. CONTENT-CENTERED TEACHING Teachers are more concerned to finish their subject matter before the end of the term. Factors: 1. Number of students vs. allocated time for teaching 2. Failure to clarify the desired learning outcomes
  5. 5. The new educational perspective requires teachers to: visualize the ideal graduate 3 or more years after graduation and right after completion of the program (graduation time)
  6. 6. CHED MEMO ORDER NO. 20, S 2014 PROGRAM OUTCOMES FOR ALL HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS The ability to: 1. Articulate and discuss the latest development in the specific field of practice. 2. Effectively communicate orally and in writing using English and Filipino.
  7. 7. CHED MEMO ORDER NO. 20, S 2014 PROGRAM OUTCOMES FOR ALL HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS The ability to: 3. Work effectively and independently in multidisciplinary and multicultural teams 4. Act in recognition of professional, social, and ethical responsibility.
  8. 8. CHED MEMO ORDER NO. 20, S 2014 PROGRAM OUTCOMES FOR ALL HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS The ability to: 5. Preserve and promote “Filipino historical and cultural heritage.”
  9. 9. HEI TYPE PROGRAM OUTCOMES • Graduates of professional institutions demonstrate a service orientation in one’s profession. • Graduates of colleges participate in various types of employment, development activities, and public discourses, particularly in response to the needs of the communities one serves.
  10. 10. HEI TYPE PROGRAM OUTCOMES • Graduates of universities participate in the generation of new knowledge or in research and development projects. • Graduates of State Universities and Colleges must, in addition, have the competencies to support “national, regional, and local development plans.
  11. 11. PROGRAM OUTCOMES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION
  12. 12. PROGRAM OUTCOMES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION 1. Articulate the rootedness of education in philosophical, socio-cultural, historical, psychological and political contexts. 2. Demonstrate mastery of subject matter/discipline 3. Facilitate learning using a wide range of teaching methodologies and delivery modes appropriate to specific learners and their environments.
  13. 13. PROGRAM OUTCOMES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION 4. Develop innovative curricula, instructional plans, teaching approaches, and resources for diverse learners. 5. Apply skills in the developmental and utilization of ICT to promote quality, relevant and sustainable educational practices.
  14. 14. PROGRAM OUTCOMES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION 6. Demonstrate a variety of thinking skills in planning, monitoring, assessing, and reporting learning processes and outcomes. 7. Practice professional and ethical teaching standards sensitive to the local, national, and global realities.
  15. 15. PROGRAM OUTCOMES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION 8. Pursue lifelong learning for personal and professional growth through varied experiential and field-based opportunities.
  16. 16. THE 3 TYPES OF LEARNING
  17. 17. 3 DOMAINS (TYPES) OF LEARNING 1. Cognitive – referring to mental skills 2. Affective – referring to growth in feeling or emotion 3. Psychomotor – referring to manual or physical skills Note: Above are translated simply into KSA (Knowledge, Skills, and Attitude)
  18. 18. DIAGRAM OF BLOOM’s TAXONOMY Image from: Draper, Steve (Composer). (2016, February 8). Bloom’s Taxonomy [Web Photo]. Retrieved February 5, 2020, from http://www.psy.gla.ac.uk/~steve/best /bloom.html.
  19. 19. DIAGRAM OF BLOOM’s TAXONOMY Image From: https://www.krausanderson .com/wp- content/uploads/2016/09/B loom.jpg
  20. 20. COGNITIVE KNOWLEDGE LEARNING OUTCOME STATEMENT 1.REMEMBERING Recite the multiplication tables Match tahe word with the parts of the picture of a sewing machine
  21. 21. COGNITIVE KNOWLEDGE LEARNING OUTCOME STATEMENT 2. Understanding Explain in own words the stages in the life cycle of a butterfly Distinguish the different geometric figures
  22. 22. COGNITIVE KNOWLEDGE LEARNING OUTCOME STATEMENT 3. Applying Use a mathematical formula to solve an algebra problem Prepare daily menus for 1 week for a family of 6
  23. 23. COGNITIVE KNOWLEDGE LEARNING OUTCOME STATEMENT 4. Analyzing Observe a classroom and list down the things to be improved Differentiate the parts of a tree
  24. 24. COGNITIVE KNOWLEDGE LEARNING OUTCOME STATEMENT 5. Evaluating Defend a research proposal Select the most effective solution Critique a class demonstration
  25. 25. COGNITIVE KNOWLEDGE LEARNING OUTCOME STATEMENT 6. Creating Compile personal records and documents into a portfolio Write a syllabus for a school subject
  26. 26. DIAGRAM OF PSYCHO- MOTOR DOMAIN Image from: Clark, Donald (Composer). (2015, January 12). The Psychomotor Domain [Web Photo]. Retrieved February 5, 2020, from http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/Bloom/ psychomotor_domain.html.
  27. 27. PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN: 7 CATEGORIES BY SIMPSON (1972) Perception (awareness): The ability to use sensory cues to guide motor activity. This ranges from sensory stimulation, through cue selection, to translation. Examples: Detects non-verbal communication cues. Estimate where a ball will land after it is thrown and then moving to the correct location to catch the ball. Adjusts heat of stove to correct temperature by smell and taste of food. Adjusts the height of the forks on a forklift by comparing where the forks are in relation to the pallet. Key Words: chooses, describes, detects, differentiates, distinguishes, identifies, isolates, relates, selects.
  28. 28. PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN: 7 CATEGORIES BY SIMPSON Set: Readiness to act. It includes mental, physical, and emotional sets. These three sets are dispositions that predetermine a person's response to different situations (sometimes called mindsets). Examples: Knows and acts upon a sequence of steps in a manufacturing process. Recognize one's abilities and limitations. Shows desire to learn a new process (motivation). NOTE: This subdivision of Psychomotor is closely related with the “Responding to phenomena” subdivision of the Affective domain. Key Words: begins, displays, explains, moves, proceeds, reacts, shows, states, volunteers.
  29. 29. PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN: 7 CATEGORIES BY SIMPSON Guided Response: The early stages in learning a complex skill that includes imitation and trial and error. Adequacy of performance is achieved by practicing. Examples: Performs a mathematical equation as demonstrated. Follows instructions to build a model. Responds hand-signals of instructor while learning to operate a forklift. Key Words: copies, traces, follows, react, reproduce, responds
  30. 30. PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN: 7 CATEGORIES BY SIMPSON Mechanism (basic proficiency): This is the intermediate stage in learning a complex skill. Learned responses have become habitual and the movements can be performed with some confidence and proficiency. Examples: Use a personal computer. Repair a leaking faucet. Drive a car. Key Words: assembles, calibrates, constructs, dismantles, displays, fastens, fixes, grinds, heats, manipulates, measures, mends, mixes, organizes, sketches.
  31. 31. PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN: 7 CATEGORIES BY SIMPSON Complex Overt Response (Expert): The skillful performance of motor acts that involve complex movement patterns. Proficiency is indicated by a quick, accurate, and highly coordinated performance, requiring a minimum of energy. This category includes performing without hesitation, and automatic performance. For example, players are often utter sounds of satisfaction or expletives as soon as they hit a tennis ball or throw a football, because they can tell by the feel of the act what the result will produce. Examples: Maneuvers a car into a tight parallel parking spot. Operates a computer quickly and accurately. Displays competence while playing the piano. The same as Mechanism, but will have adverbs or adjectives that indicate that the performance is quicker, better, more accurate, etc.
  32. 32. Image from: https://i.ytim g.com/vi/L0U SJe44yS4/ma xresdefault.jp g
  33. 33. Image from: https://3.bp.blogs pot.com/- TaK8LlrJCgc/Wszw gi- bJOI/AAAAAAAA WUA/PwLaqraDo 8gw9PSEz7cyrwrO pV5RXNB7ACLcBG As/s1600/Adjectiv es-prepositions-2- 1.jpg
  34. 34. PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN: 7 CATEGORIES BY SIMPSON Adaptation: Skills are well developed and the individual can modify movement patterns to fit special requirements. Examples: Responds effectively to unexpected experiences. Modifies instruction to meet the needs of the learners. Perform a task with a machine that it was not originally intended to do (machine is not damaged and there is no danger in performing the new task). Key Words: adapts, alters, changes, rearranges, reorganizes, revises, varies.
  35. 35. PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN: 7 CATEGORIES BY SIMPSON Origination: Creating new movement patterns to fit a particular situation or specific problem. Learning outcomes emphasize creativity based upon highly developed skills. Examples: Constructs a new theory. Develops a new and comprehensive training programming. Creates a new gymnastic routine. Key Words: arranges, builds, combines, composes, constructs, creates, designs, initiate, makes, originates.
  36. 36. Imitation — Observing and patterning behavior after someone else. Performance may be of low quality. Examples: Copying a work of art. Performing a skill while observing a demonstrator. Key Words: copy, follow, mimic, repeat, replicate, reproduce, trace PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN TAXONOMY BY DAVE (1975)
  37. 37. Manipulation — Being able to perform certain actions by memory or following instructions. Examples: Being able to perform a skill on one's own after taking lessons or reading about it. Follows instructions to build a model. Key Words: act, build, execute, perform PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN TAXONOMY BY DAVE (1975)
  38. 38. Precision — Refining, becoming more exact. Performing a skill within a high degree of precision Examples: Working and reworking something, so it will be “just right.” Perform a skill or task without assistance. Demonstrate a task to a beginner. Key Words: calibrate, demonstrate, master, perfectionism PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN TAXONOMY BY DAVE (1975)
  39. 39. Articulation — Coordinating and adapting a series of actions to achieve harmony and internal consistency. Examples: Combining a series of skills to produce a video that involves music, drama, color, sound, etc. Combining a series of skills or activities to meet a novel requirement. Key Words: adapt, constructs, combine, creates, customize, modifies, formulate PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN TAXONOMY BY DAVE (1975)
  40. 40. Naturalization — Mastering a high level performance until it become second-nature or natural, without needing to think much about it. Examples: Maneuvers a car into a tight parallel parking spot. Operates a computer quickly and accurately. Displays competence while playing the piano. Michael Jordan playing basketball or Nancy Lopez hitting a golf ball. Key Words: create, design, develop, invent, manage, naturally PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN TAXONOMY BY DAVE (1975)
  41. 41. Reflex Movements — Reactions that are not learned, such as a involuntary reaction Examples: instinctive response Key Words: react, respond PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN TAXONOMY BY HARROW (1972)
  42. 42. STIMULUS-RESPONSE PATHWAY From: Bio, Ninja (Composer). (2020, January 24). Overview Of The Stimulus-Response Pathway [Web Photo]. Retrieved January 23, 2020, from https://ib.bioninja.com.au/_Media/stimulus-response_med.jpeg
  43. 43. Fundamental Movements — Basic movements such as walking, or grasping. Examples: perform a simple task Key Words: grasp an object, throw a ball, walk PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN TAXONOMY BY HARROW (1972)
  44. 44. Perceptual Abilities — Response to stimuli such as visual, auditory, kinesthetic, or tactile discrimination. Examples: track a moving object, recognize a pattern Key Words: catch a ball, draw or write PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN TAXONOMY BY HARROW (1972)
  45. 45. Physical Abilities (fitness) — Stamina that must be developed for further development such as strength and agility. Examples: gain strength, run a marathon Key Words: agility, endurance, strength PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN TAXONOMY BY HARROW (1972)
  46. 46. Skilled movements — Advanced learned movements as one would find in sports or acting. Examples: Using an advanced series of integrated movements, perform a role in a stage play or play in a set of series in a sports game. Key Words: adapt, constructs, creates, modifies PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN TAXONOMY BY HARROW (1972)
  47. 47. Nondiscursive communication — Use effective body language, such as gestures and facial expressions. Examples: Express one's self by using movements and gestures Key Words: arrange, compose, interpretation PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN TAXONOMY BY HARROW (1972)
  48. 48. DIAGRAM OF THE AFFECTIVE DOMAIN Image From: Clark, Donald (Composer). (2015, January 12). The Affective Domain [Web Photo]. Retrieved February 5, 2020, from http://www.nwlink.com/~ donclark/hrd/Bloom/Affec tive_Domain.jpg.
  49. 49. Receiving Phenomena: Awareness, willingness to hear, selected attention. Examples: Listen to others with respect. Listen for and remember the name of newly introduced people. Key Words: acknowledge, asks, attentive, courteous, dutiful, follows, gives, listens, understands Example Key Words Reference: Clark, Donald (2015). The Affective Domain. Retrieved February 5, 2020, from http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/Bloom/affective_domain.html.
  50. 50. Responds to Phenomena: Active participation on the part of the learners. Attend and react to a particular phenomenon. Learning outcomes may emphasize compliance in responding, willingness to respond, or satisfaction in responding (motivation). Examples: Participates in class discussions. Gives a presentation. Questions new ideals, concepts, models, etc. in order to fully understand them. Know the safety rules and practice them. Key Words: answers, assists, aids, complies, conforms, discusses, greets, helps, labels, performs, presents, tells Example Key Words Reference: Clark, Donald (2015). The Affective Domain. Retrieved February 5, 2020, from http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/Bloom/affective_domain.html.
  51. 51. Valuing: The worth or value a person attaches to a particular object, phenomenon, or behavior. This ranges from simple acceptance to the more complex state of commitment. Valuing is based on the internalization of a set of specified values, while clues to these values are expressed in the learner's overt behavior and are often identifiable. Examples: Demonstrates belief in the democratic process. Is sensitive towards individual and cultural differences (value diversity). Shows the ability to solve problems. Proposes a plan to social improvement and follows through with commitment. Informs management on matters that one feels strongly about. Key Words: appreciates, cherish, treasure, demonstrates, initiates, invites, joins, justifies, proposes, respect, shares Example Key Words Reference: Clark, Donald (2015). The Affective Domain. Retrieved February 5, 2020, from http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/Bloom/affective_domain.html.
  52. 52. Organization: Organizes values into priorities by contrasting different values, resolving conflicts between them, and creating an unique value system. The emphasis is on comparing, relating, and synthesizing values. Examples: Recognizes the need for balance between freedom and responsible behavior. Explains the role of systematic planning in solving problems. Accepts professional ethical standards. Creates a life plan in harmony with abilities, interests, and beliefs. Prioritizes time effectively to meet the needs of the organization, family, and self. Key Words: compares, relates, synthesizes Example Key Words Reference: Clark, Donald (2015). The Affective Domain. Retrieved February 5, 2020, from http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/Bloom/affective_domain.html.
  53. 53. Internalizes Values (characterization): Has a value system that controls their behavior. The behavior is pervasive, consistent, predictable, and most important characteristic of the learner. Instructional objectives are concerned with the student's general patterns of adjustment (personal, social, emotional). Examples: Shows self-reliance when working independently. Cooperates in group activities (displays teamwork). Uses an objective approach in problem solving. Displays a professional commitment to ethical practice on a daily basis. Revises judgments and changes behavior in light of new evidence. Values people for what they are, not how they look. Key Words: acts, discriminates, displays, influences, modifies, performs, qualifies, questions, revises, serves, solves, verifies Example Key Words Reference: Clark, Donald (2015). The Affective Domain. Retrieved February 5, 2020, from http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/Bloom/affective_domain.html.
  54. 54. SIMPLIFIED/REORGANIZED LEVELS OF LEARNING IN THE PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN CATEGORIES/ LEVELS Outcome Verbs Learning Outcomes Statement 1. OBSERVING Active mental attention to physical activity Watch, detect, distinguish, differentiate, describe, relate, select Detect non-verbal communication cues; watch a more experienced person; observe and read directions
  55. 55. SIMPLIFIED/REORGANIZED LEVELS OF LEARNING IN THE PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN CATEGORIES/ LEVELS Outcome Verbs Learning Outcomes Statement 2. IMITATING Attempt to copy a physical behavior Begin, explain, move, display, proceed, react, show, state, volunteer Show understanding and do sequence of steps with assistance; Recognize one’s limitations
  56. 56. SIMPLIFIED/REORGANIZED LEVELS OF LEARNING IN THE PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN CATEGORIES/ LEVELS Outcome Verbs Learning Outcomes Statement 3. PRACTISING performing a specific activity repeatedly Bend, calibrate, Construct, differentiate, dismantle, display, Fasten, fix, grasp, grind, handle, measure, mix, operate, manipulate, mend Operate quickly and accurately; display competence while performing, performance is moving towards becoming automatic and smooth.
  57. 57. SIMPLIFIED/REORGANIZED LEVELS OF LEARNING IN THE PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN CATEGORIES/ LEVELS Outcome Verbs Learning Outcomes Statement 4. ADAPTING Fine tuning the skill and making minor adjustments to attain perfection Organize, relax, Shorten, sketch, Write, re-arrange, Compose, create, Design, originate Perform automatically; construct a new scheme/sequence; apply skill in new situation, create a new routine, develop a new program
  58. 58. KENDALL AND MARZANO’S • They reframe the 3 domains of Bloom’s knowledge (information, mental procedures, and psychomotor procedures) By describing 6 levels of processing knowledge
  59. 59. DIAGRAM OF KENDALL’S AND MARZANO’S NEW TAXONOMY OF EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES Image From: http://richarddsolomonsblog.blog spot.com/2013/04/benjamin- blooms-taxonomy-of- educational.html
  60. 60. NEXT SLIDES PRESENTS THE NEW TAXONOMY BY MARZANO AND KENDALL AS FOLLOWS: - LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY - PROCESS - USEFUL VERBS, PHRASES, DEFINITIONS
  61. 61. 1. RETRIEVAL
  62. 62. 2. COMPREHENSION
  63. 63. 3. ANALYSIS
  64. 64. 4. KNOWLEDGE UTILIZATION
  65. 65. 5. METACOGNITION
  66. 66. 6. SELF SYSTEM THINKING
  67. 67. REFERENCE: Navarro, Rosita L., Santos, Rosita G., & Corpuz, Brenda B. (2017). Assessment Of Learning 1 (3rd ed.). Metro Manila: Lori Mar Publishing. Clark, Donald (2015). The Affective Domain. Retrieved February 5, 2020, from http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/Bloom/affective_domain.html.

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