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Data Privacy: Implications for market researchers

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Data Privacy: Implications for market researchers

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How concerned is the public about the privacy of their personal information? Has their concern changed over the past two years in light of recent privacy breaches? Previous research by J.D. Power and SSI in 2012 revealed cohort differences in personal data sharing, with older generations engaging in less online behavior and having more serious concerns about consumer privacy. Overall in the US, 68% of people agreed or strongly agreed that existing laws and organizational practices provided a reasonable level of protection for consumer privacy, however 81% of respondents also felt that consumers had lost control over their personal information and its collection/use by companies.

As privacy issues continue to be at the forefront of consumer’s minds, does this translate into higher percentages of respondents in 2014 that believe current laws are not sufficient to protect consumer information and that control over their personal information has continued to degrade? And, perhaps most importantly, how do these perceptions over privacy impact actual consumer behavior (if at all)? This presentation will focus on changes over time in privacy perceptions, differences among markets, and the relationship between consumers with higher levels of privacy concern and their attitudes and behaviors (e.g. providing false information, setting profile to private). Most importantly, the presentation addresses how this may directly impact market researchers- such as a consumer’s willingness to participate in surveys due to privacy concerns.

How concerned is the public about the privacy of their personal information? Has their concern changed over the past two years in light of recent privacy breaches? Previous research by J.D. Power and SSI in 2012 revealed cohort differences in personal data sharing, with older generations engaging in less online behavior and having more serious concerns about consumer privacy. Overall in the US, 68% of people agreed or strongly agreed that existing laws and organizational practices provided a reasonable level of protection for consumer privacy, however 81% of respondents also felt that consumers had lost control over their personal information and its collection/use by companies.

As privacy issues continue to be at the forefront of consumer’s minds, does this translate into higher percentages of respondents in 2014 that believe current laws are not sufficient to protect consumer information and that control over their personal information has continued to degrade? And, perhaps most importantly, how do these perceptions over privacy impact actual consumer behavior (if at all)? This presentation will focus on changes over time in privacy perceptions, differences among markets, and the relationship between consumers with higher levels of privacy concern and their attitudes and behaviors (e.g. providing false information, setting profile to private). Most importantly, the presentation addresses how this may directly impact market researchers- such as a consumer’s willingness to participate in surveys due to privacy concerns.

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Data Privacy: Implications for market researchers

  1. 1. © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Data Privacy: Implications for market researchers May 8, 2015 Bay Area Research Forum Conference Valerie Lykes │ valerie.lykes@jdpa.com │ J.D. Power Kristin Cavallaro │ Kristin.Cavallaro@SurveySampling.com │ SSI Gina Pingitore │ gina.pingitore@jdpa.com │ J.D. Power
  2. 2. 2 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Situation  Consumer concerns about personal data continue to be of global importance  86% of consumers in 9 countries agree or strongly agree they have lost control over their personal information and its use  Ave. cost to companies for a data breach was $3.5M • Reputation • Lost customer loyalty Source: http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/worlds-biggest-data-breaches-hacks/
  3. 3. 3 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. What We Examined  Re-examined consumers’ attitudes towards privacy • Evaluated whether these attitudes have changed over time • Expanded our across markets assessment  Assessed the degree to which concerns predict behavior ̶ If so, what are implications of increased concern on survey taking?
  4. 4. 4 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. How We Did It  Using SSI’s panels, we surveyed adult consumers (18- 67+) in nine markets: • United States (n ≈ 4,200) • China (n≈2,000) • India (n≈2,000) • Germany (n≈3,000) • Japan (n≈2,500) • Brazil (n≈2,200) • United Kingdom (n≈4,500) • Australia (n≈2,200) • Canada (n≈3,200)  Data weighted to be representative of each country’s age distribution
  5. 5. 5 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. US Consumer’s Opinions About Management of Personal Data Over Time 80% 51% 82% 66% 89% 59% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Consumers have lost control over how personal information is collected and used by companies. Existing laws and organizational practices provide a reasonable level of protection for consumer privacy today 1999 2012 2014 Concerns about how personal data is collected and used has increased among US consumers. Additionally, confidence that existing laws protect consumers has declined since 2012, possibly leading to more restrictions.
  6. 6. 6 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Cohort Differences in US Privacy Concerns 2012-2014 % 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Gen Y Gen X Boomer Pre-Boomer %AgreeStronglyAgree Existing laws and organizational practices provide a reasonable level of protection for consumer privacy today 2012 2014 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Gen Y Gen X Boomer Pre-Boomer %AgreeStronglyAgree Consumers have lost control over how personal information is collected and used by companies. 2012 2014 Older consumers feel they have lost control more than Gen Y. Gen Y strongest agreement that existing laws/org policies are sufficient to protect privacy.
  7. 7. 7 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Are Concerns Also Increasing in Other Countries? Concern over how personal information is being collected/used is up in all 3 countries. Only India reports existing laws and practices to be acceptable to protect privacy. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 2012 2014 %AgreeStronglyAgree Consumers have lost control over how personal information is collected and used by companies. US China India 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 2012 2014 %AgreeStronglyAgree Existing laws and organizational practices provide a reasonable level of protection for consumer privacy today US China India
  8. 8. 8 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Nearly All Other Mature Markets Have Similar Concerns About the Collection and Use of Personal Information Globally, consumers feel they do not control their personal information, though emerging markets are not as concerned 89% 81% 81% 88% 85% 85% 89% 89% 90% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% US China India Australia Brazil Canada Germany Japan UK %Agree/StronglyAgree Consumers have lost control over how personal information is collected and used by companies
  9. 9. 9 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. But Attitudes About Legal and Organization Protection Varies More Widely Loss of control is high for all, but not all consumers are equal in their concern about how the law and companies are protecting their privacy- this depends on the market they operate in 59% 45% 84% 70% 66% 64% 33% 59% 65% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% US China India Australia Brazil Canada Germany Japan UK %Agree/StronglyAgree Existing laws and organizational practices provide a reasonable level of protection for consumer privacy today
  10. 10. 10 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. What we have concluded so far… Privacy concerns are increasing globally Differences by cohort • Gen Y least concerned Differences by country • Emerging Markets least concerned But, do these concerns predict attitudes & behaviors?
  11. 11. 11 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Larger differences between high and low privacy concern are seen when consumers have “no consent” in how their data is being used compared to “indirect consent” Avg. 7.5% Δ Avg. 14% Δ 54% 66% 64% 48% 44% 70% 80% 77% 56% 51% A product you viewed is advertised on other websites Your email provider scans your email to advertise to you better An app you downloaded tracks your location and stores the data Your review is used in a company restaurant report Books are suggested to you based on your book purchase history High Concern Low Concern Privacy Concerns Predicts Attitudes Towards Privacy Scenarios Indirect Consent No Consent
  12. 12. 12 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Online Activity Not Predicted by Concern Those with higher levels of privacy concern do more internet-aided shopping than their counterparts. 3.7 4.0 3.7 4.2 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 # of sites/social networks participated in (0-12) # of Internet Shopping Activities (0-6) High Concern Low Concern
  13. 13. 13 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Concerns Predict Online Behaviors 71% 72% 54% 65% 44% 76% 61% 46% 57% 47% Regretted posting personal info Post personal pics to social media sites Post personal pics to photo sharing sites Write about personal life Give false information % At Least Somewhat Often High Concern Low Concern False information rates about equal – concern doesn’t affect providing false info Trend for remaining is the same- higher privacy concern leads to lower incidence of behavior
  14. 14. 14 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Are There Differences by Countries? Privacy concern does influence frequency of setting one’s profile to private, but still differences between markets 50% 18% 49% 48% 44% 48% 36% 31% 51% 61% 28% 67% 61% 57% 68% 51% 48% 64% UK Japan Germany Canada Brazil Australia India China US %Often/Always Set Profile to Private High Concern Low Concern
  15. 15. 15 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Who Should Have Access to Your Data? 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% US China India Australia Brazil Canada Germany Japan UK Companies Whose Products/Services you purchase Age Cell # Health Information Web Activity Emerging markets less concerned about companies having access to personal information including health information and cell number
  16. 16. 16 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Who Should Have Access to Your Data? 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% US China India Australia Brazil Canada Germany Japan UK Government Age Cell # Health Information Web Activity Emerging markets less concerned about government having cell # and tracking web activity
  17. 17. 17 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Rate of Information Falsifications by Country False information is provided in all countries, but the frequency of false information provided is most concerning in China and Germany. 21% 31% 23% 20% 17% 23% 26% 13% 21% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% U.S. China India Australia Brazil Canada Germany Japan UK %Sometimes/Often
  18. 18. 18 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. What Types of Information Do People Falsify? Consumers’ opinions are one of the least frequently cited types of false information reported. PII most frequently falsified. *Most prevalent “Other” responses include phone/mobile number, work/job, and salary Type of False Information Provided by Country US China India Australia Brazil Canada Germany Japan UK Name 40% 61% 34% 43% 36% 47% 43% 34% 39% Location 49% 54% 42% 45% 60% 54% 47% 31% 44% Age 41% 41% 36% 44% 36% 47% 34% 32% 38% Gender 16% 22% 23% 15% 11% 18% 10% 20% 14% Things you are interested in 21% 18% 32% 20% 28% 20% 21% 29% 22% Your opinions 15% 15% 21% 14% 11% 14% 8% 22% 15% What you read, watch, or listen to 15% 11% 24% 13% 14% 16% 14% 22% 15% Other 16% 3% 13% 16% 9% 12% 18% 7% 21%
  19. 19. 19 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Younger Adults Provide False Information More Often 32% 24% 16% 9% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% Gen Y Gen X Boomers Pre-Boomers %Sometimes/Often How often do you provide false information?
  20. 20. 20 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. And the Pattern is Consistent Across Countries 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 US China India Australia Brazil Canada Germany Japan UK 0=Never,100=Often Frequency of providing false information Gen Y Gen X Boomer Pre-Boomer
  21. 21. 21 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Conclusions  Privacy concerns continue to increase globally • Concern high across 9 markets • Younger generations not as concerned • Younger generations more online participation ̶ Function of age or generation? Concern go down as Gen Y grows up?  Concerns are linked to behaviors and attitudes • False info, profiles set to private, fewer blog and social network posts. • Directly impacts market researchers ̶ Consumers decline to participate for privacy reasons
  22. 22. 22 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Concerns Influence Reason to Decline to Take Surveys 37% 47% 14% 18% 22% 35% 45% 26% 21% 29% Not interested in topic No time Privacy Concerns Inadequate Incentive Had to download software/app Why Panelists Declined to Participate in a Survey High Concern Low Concern
  23. 23. 23 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Concern Impact by Country on Survey Participation 39% 31% 44% 41% 22% 40% 32% 25% 39% 48% 34% 52% 47% 25% 42% 28% 35% 48% UK Japan Germany Canada Brazil Australia India China US Declined to Take a Survey in Last Year High Concern Low Concern
  24. 24. 24 © 2015 J.D. Power and Associates, McGraw Hill Financial. All Rights Reserved. Questions?

Notas do Editor

  • US Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights in 2012 (might explain some of the increase in laws practices OK)
  • Shopping Research: out of 6. Books (Did you use the Internet in ANY way to help you shop (e.g., research products, prices, etc.) for any of the following?)
    Clothing, shoes or jewelry (Did you use the Internet in ANY way to help you shop (e.g., research products, prices, etc.) for any of the following?)
    Electronics or computers (Did you use the Internet in ANY way to help you shop (e.g., research products, prices, etc.) for any of the following?)
    New cars or trucks (Did you use the Internet in ANY way to help you shop (e.g., research products, prices, etc.) for any of the following?)
    Movies, music or games (Did you use the Internet in ANY way to help you shop (e.g., research products, prices, etc.) for any of the following?)
    Travel (e.g., airlines, hotels, etc.) (Did you use the Internet in ANY way to help you shop (e.g., research products, prices, etc.) for any of the following?)
    Books (Did you use any online information (websites and/or apps) on a computer, tablet or smartphone to help you shop (e.g., research products, prices etc.) for any of the following?)
    Clothing, shoes or jewelry (Did you use any online information (websites and/or apps) on a computer, tablet or smartphone to help you shop (e.g., research products, prices etc.) for any of the following?)
    Electronics or computers (Did you use any online information (websites and/or apps) on a computer, tablet or smartphone to help you shop (e.g., research products, prices etc.) for any of the following?)
    New cars or trucks (Did you use any online information (websites and/or apps) on a computer, tablet or smartphone to help you shop (e.g., research products, prices etc.) for any of the following?)
    Movies, music or games (Did you use any online information (websites and/or apps) on a computer, tablet or smartphone to help you shop (e.g., research products, prices etc.) for any of the following?)
    Travel (e.g., airlines, hotels, etc.) (Did you use any online information (websites and/or apps) on a computer, tablet or smartphone to help you shop (e.g., research products, prices etc.) for any of the following? ) Online Participation: out of 12. Sum of Thinking about your online habits, which of the following types of sites or social networks do you currently participate in?) Social Networking Sites (e.g. FB, Google+, Linked In) Blogs, either personal or corporate Photo sharing sites like Flickr Video sharing sites like YouTube Shopping sites like Groupon Locatino sharing like Foursquare Rating/Review sites like Yelp! And Trip Advisor Bookmarking/tagging sites like Delicious Message boards email clients (yahoo, gmail, etc.) messaging apps like WeChat or iMessage
  • Note no real difference between those with high and low concern on giving False Info. Might be a generation influence. Gen Y least concerned, but also most likely to

    False info- Lots of reasons why people might provide it that is why no real difference here. Call out Regret posting- reverse coded.
  • On average people provide 2 types of false information.
  • Likely seeing an interaction by age. Younger Cohorts least concerned about privacy so when look at low and high privacy against false info as a behavior it makes them fairly even.
  • 33% Gen Y, 36% Gen X, 40% Boomer, 46% Pre-Boomer
  • Lot of data- challenges to access b/c of privacy
    If continue to increase, impact survey taking and access to other customer related data
    Where does the insight community fit into this?
    Voice of consumer
    Trust, experience, confidentiality, transparency

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