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The Business Side | Translating and the Computer

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Keynote presentation at the Translating and the Computer Conference. London, UK. November 2015.
#TC37

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The Business Side | Translating and the Computer

  1. 1. GAJAH ANNUAL REPORT 2015 | 1 The Business Side #TC37 Richard Brooks K International 10:00 - 10:50am Thursday, 26 November 2015 Translating and the Computer 2015 Westminster, London Translating and the Computer
  2. 2. GAJAH ANNUAL REPORT 2015 | 2 DOWNLOAD THIS SLIDEDECK http://tinyurl.com/TC35Brooks
  3. 3. GAJAH ANNUAL REPORT 2015 | 3
  4. 4. GAJAH ANNUAL REPORT 2015 | 4
  5. 5. GAJAH ANNUAL REPORT 2015 | 5
  6. 6. GAJAH ANNUAL REPORT 2015 | 6 “If you need a friend, get a dog.”
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  8. 8. GAJAH ANNUAL REPORT 2015 | 8 “Let’s get a consultant in” More management nonsense at http://dilbert.com/
  9. 9. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 9 Strengths Opportunities Weaknesses Threats Located in UK From outside the UK Not be located in UK Located in UKDiverse portfolio Diverse portfolio Diverse portfolio Diverse portfolio More nonsense More nonsense More nonsense More nonsense Stupid Waste Of Time
  10. 10. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 10 • PEST(LE) Analysis • Porter’s Five Forces • Resourced Based View • Business Model Canvas • Strategy Canvas Tools to Actually Help you Analyse
  11. 11. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 11
  12. 12. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 12 Environmental Analysis PESTLE Framework Political Environmental Social Technology Legislation Economic • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. • Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud. • Exerci tation ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. • Duis autem vel eum iriure dolor in hendrerit in vulputate. • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. • Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud. • Exerci tation ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. • Duis autem vel eum iriure dolor in hendrerit in vulputate. • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. • Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud. • Exerci tation ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. • Duis autem vel eum iriure dolor in hendrerit in vulputate • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. • Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud. • Exerci tation ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. • Duis autem vel eum iriure dolor in hendrerit in vulputate. • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. • Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud. • Exerci tation ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. • Duis autem vel eum iriure dolor in hendrerit in vulputate. • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. • Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud. • Exerci tation ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. • Duis autem vel eum iriure dolor in hendrerit in vulputate.
  13. 13. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 13 Industry Analysis Porter's five forces of competitive position Threat of New Market Entrants Threat of Substitute Products Rivalry within the Industry Bargaining Power of Buyers Power of Suppliers More Reading > http://www.exed.hbs.edu/assets/documents/hbr-shape-strategy.pdf
  14. 14. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 14 Bargaining Power of Suppliers Suppliers are POWERFUL if... • There is a credible forward integration threat by suppliers. • Suppliers are concentrated. • There is a significant cost to switch suppliers. • The customers are powerful. Suppliers are WEAK if... • The product is standardized. • There are many competitive suppliers. • They are supplying commodity products. • There is a credible backward integration threat by purchasers. • There are concentrated purchasers. • The customers are weak. What does the bargaining power of suppliers in our industry look like?
  15. 15. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 15 Bargaining Power of Customers Customers are POWERFUL if... • There are a few buyers with significant market share. • Buyers purchase a significant proportion of the output. • Buyers possess a credible backward integration threat. Customers are WEAK if... • Producers can threaten forward integration, taking over customers’ position. • There are significant buyer switching costs. • There are many customers – significant influence on a particular product or price is small. • Producers supply critical portions of the customers’ input What does the bargaining power of customers in our industry look like?
  16. 16. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 16 Resource Based View • Looks internally at a firm’s Resources (and Capabilities and Competences) and how these can be arranged to deliver sustainable competitive advantage. • Often used as a response to the Environment (PESTLE) and Industry (5 Forces) Analysis. • Resources that are simultaneously Valuable, Rare, Imperfectly Imitable and Non-Sustitutable deliver sustainable competitive advantage. • Look for these in your competitors businesses… Look for resources you have that are rare and try and add value to them. More Reading > http://business.illinois.edu/josephm/BA545_Fall%202011/S10/Barney%20(1991).pdf
  17. 17. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 17 Use these tools to help your customers develop their strategy. To add value…
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  19. 19. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 19 Customer Segments Who is your customer? What market segments are you providing a service/product for?
  20. 20. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 20 What value do we deliver to your clients? or To your client’s supply chain? Is it based on > performance, brand, value, convenience, price… Value Propositions
  21. 21. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 21 Channels to Market How are you going to get your product/service to your clients? Is it virtual? Or is it a physical product? Are our channels integrated into our client’s supply chain?
  22. 22. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 22 Customer Relationships For each segment… what's the relationship like? Transactional, self-service, account/relationship managers, community.
  23. 23. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 23 Revenue Streams For what value are our customers willing to pay for? Per unit charge, hourly, subscription, licenses, leasing. Price discrimination or fixed price.
  24. 24. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 24 Key Resources What key resources do we need for the right hand side? Are they human, intellectual, financial or physical.
  25. 25. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 25 Key Activities The most important actions needed to make you business model work. e.g. problem solving (for consultants).
  26. 26. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 26 Key Partnerships Who do you need as your key partners. Used to optimise your business model, reduce risk or acquire resources.
  27. 27. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 27 Cost Structure Describes all costs involved in operating a business model. Is this business… cost driven, value driven, % of fixed and variable costs and are there economies of scale/scope?
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  34. 34. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 34 Differentiate – Don’t Discount “The truth is that if you are in an overcrowded market where you don’t stand out, all lowering prices will achieve is to erode your margins. Unless your business has lower costs than EVERYONE else’s, discounting is a losing game. There is an alternative – successful differentiation. If you can’t come up with something genuinely different and superior, nothing else will save you” - Alastair Dryburgh. Management Today. December 2012, P16.
  35. 35. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 35 Commodity Good? from Investopedia.com
  36. 36. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 36 Is translation a commodity?
  37. 37. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 37 No it bloody isn’t. But some of us sell it on price, so it feels like price is the only differentiator (a bit like a commodity).
  38. 38. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 38 Your ProductPotential Customer Awesome person who can do amazing things. + = This isn’t what you sell This is
  39. 39. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 39 Nurture Client Expand Business Seek New Opportunities Core Nuisance Give Low Attention Lose Without Pain Exploitable Drive Premium Price Seek Short Term Adv. Risk Losing Customer VALUE OF BUSINESS A T T R A C T I V E N E S S Development Cosset Client Defend Vigorously High Level of Service High Responsiveness Only 1% of suppliers are here, bad news. When you’re here you can charge 15% more, good news. Used by the vast majority of buying directors. Supplier preferencing matrix | Kraljic 1983 HBR
  40. 40. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 40 Pretium = Price Pretium = Value The thinking in 10 B.C. Price = Value The problem in 2015 A.D. Price ≠ Value Pretium
  41. 41. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 41 … 4G is “the communications equivalent of the change the jet engine made over steam” >>> Inability to monetise value creation Olaf Swantee, CEO EE 3G 1GB £31 4G 1GB £26 When Value > Price
  42. 42. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 42 Becky Williams M&S Apology When Price > Value >>> lack of understanding of an emotive reaction to a small price change
  43. 43. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 43 • The last time you met an Accoutant? • The last time you met someone from procurement (or vendor management? • The last time you met someone from the pricing department? Rich ponders…
  44. 44. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 44 Of all the 7 Ps Price has the single most immediate effect on the bottom line. (hint hint… would make a nice tweet)
  45. 45. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 45 “the single most important decision in evaluating a business is pricing power” “if you’ve got the power to raise prices without losing business to a competitor, you’ve got a good business. And if you have a prayer session before raising the price by 10% you have a terrible business” - Warren Buffet/MIT 2011
  46. 46. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 46 What does a 2% rise in price do to your profits?
  47. 47. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 47 P&L #1 Income £100 000 Cost of Sales -£50 000 Gross Profit £50 000 Overheads -£40 000 PBIT £10 000 Interest -£5 000 Tax -£1 000 Profit £4 000 P&L #2 (2% increase in price) Income £102 000 Cost of Sales -£50 000 Gross Profit £52 000 Overheads -£40 000 PBIT £12 000 Interest -£5 000 Tax -£1 400 Profit £5 600
  48. 48. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 48 2% rise in price = 40% Increase in profits All other things being equal (tax calculated at 20%)
  49. 49. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 49 Cost Plus. Amounts to a mark-up on costs… is widely used but rarely the most profitable. Competition driven. Amounts to using price within a game theoretic framework for strategic advantage. Customer Driven. Amounts to using price to achieve short-term sales objectives rather than profits. Value Based. Amounts to understanding the value created and then maximising its capture. Pricing Strategies
  50. 50. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 50 The butter costs more than the corn and the paper bag/cup it comes in costs more than both together.
  51. 51. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 51 Created shareholder value by forecasting revenue streams. Move from providing a product to a bespoke service.
  52. 52. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 52 “… a unique mix of attributes that companies provide through their products, interactions, ethos and pricing to create loyalty and satisfaction in targeted customer segments. It is the unique set of benefits a business offers its target customers.” - P Kotler Value Proposition
  53. 53. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 53 Value = Benefits - Cost
  54. 54. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 54 Add Value… Think how the impact, capability and cost change as you increase the complexity of your product/service to have a larger impact on your customer. Increasing (and demonstrating) value as you go. … and extract some of it
  55. 55. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 55 The Total Share of Wallet Made up of • What you do for the client • What your competitors do for the client • What the client does themselves • What the client doesn’t do but should
  56. 56. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 56 Therefore Different Strategies Or Marketing Approaches… • To retain our key clients • To take business from competitors • To convince the client to outsource • To educate the client
  57. 57. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 57 P&G paid $57 Billion for Gillette (in 2005) but they only acquired $6 Billion of tangible assets*. *David Haigh, Brand Finance, Marketing Magazine, 1st April 2005
  58. 58. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 60 • Better price • Higher sales • Lower prices • Better terms • Higher Search Engine Results • More partners • Better retention • Lower salary expectations • Better qualified candidates • Higher PE ratio • Lower volatility • Lower borrowing costs What does a Brand give you? Its way more than your logo…
  59. 59. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 61 If you put lipstick on a gorilla you’ve still have to kiss it.
  60. 60. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 62Bennis, Warren, 1989. On Becoming a Leader. New York: Addison Wesley. Bennis’ list of differences • The manager administers; the leader innovates. • The manager is a copy; the leader is an original. • The manager maintains; the leader develops. • The manager focuses on systems and structure; the leader focuses on people. • The manager relies on control; the leader inspires trust. • The manager has a short-range view; the leader has a long-range perspective. • The manager asks how and when; the leader asks what and why. • The manager has his or her eye always on the bottom line; the leader’s eye is on the horizon. • The manager imitates; the leader originates. • The manager accepts the status quo; the leader challenges it. • The manager is the classic good soldier; the leader is his or her own person. • The manager does things right; the leader does the right thing.
  61. 61. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 63 http://hackthesystem.com/blog/why-i-hired-a-girl-on-craigslist-to-slap-me-in-the-face-and-why-it-quadrupled-my-productivity/
  62. 62. @RichardMBrooks #TC37 | 64
  63. 63. Richard Brooks uk.linkedin.com/in/richardbrooks twitter.com/@RichardMBrooks plus.google.com/+RichardBrooks_L10N 0044 1908 557900 Richard.Brooks@k-international.com www.k-international.com Look after yourselves. All the best for 2016.

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