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Wielkopolska activities with potential to cluster to cluster collaboration EU-India in Agri-food sector

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Wielkopolska activities with potential to cluster to cluster collaboration EU-India in Agri-food sector

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We introduce the experiences and lessons learned towards the development of a smart agriculture infrastructure in Wielkopolska region, and comment on potential gaps and opportunities for clustering collaborations

We introduce the experiences and lessons learned towards the development of a smart agriculture infrastructure in Wielkopolska region, and comment on potential gaps and opportunities for clustering collaborations

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Wielkopolska activities with potential to cluster to cluster collaboration EU-India in Agri-food sector

  1. 1. Poznań Supercomputing and Networking Center Raul Palma Semantic Technologies Coordinator Network Services Division 18/12/2015, New Delhi, India
  2. 2. PoznanSupercomputing and Networking Center • Established in 1993 by the State Committee for Scientific Research • Affiliated to the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry PAS • Leading operator of Polish e-Infrastructure • Large HPC infrastructure • Multiple R&D groups organized in 4 divisions • Supercomputing, Network Technologies, Network Services, Applications • Digital libraries, semantic tech, research data services, future internet tech, telemedicine, and others • Over 100 International R&D projects • Over 300 people BriefIntroduction Mission: Integration and implementation of scientific research results via the deployment of services for public administration, healthcare, education, agri-food and the social sectors in polish e-infrastructure
  3. 3. • 21 Academic Optical Based MAN • Poznan MAN operated by PSNC • 5 HPC Centers • One in Poznan (PSNC) • Polish NREN – PIONIER • Fiber infrastructure owned by PSNC • Science Services Platform – PLATON • HD Videoconference services • Deployment of eduroam services • Applications on Demand for campuses • Archiving on Demand • Science HDTV services • Digital Libraries Federation • Developed and operated by PSNC • National Data Storage Driving force for ICT Innovation Ecosystems Polish e-Infrastructure
  4. 4. HPC infrastructure at PSNC Provision of computing power, archive systems, Internet and network services, cloud infrastructure • Computing power: 350+ TFlops -> towards PFlops • Over 15.000 cores • Internal memory (RAM): 27.3 TB • Disk space: 1.5 PB (fast access, disk arrays, fast SSD cache) • Mass storage: 3.5 PB Production QA environment
  5. 5. Towards the development of smart agriculture infrastructure in Wielkopolska region
  6. 6. How to build a smart infrastructurein theregion ? • Identifying andengaging stakeholders • Establishing collaboration and defining goals and scenarios • Setting up the base infrastructure • Building and/ordeploying smart servicesand applications • Testing and usertrialing • Disseminating activities and results Experiencesand lessons learned
  7. 7. Identifying and engaging stakeholders Coveringtheoverallecosystem R&D • PoznanUniversityofLifeSciences (PULS) • InstituteofPlantGeneticsPAS (IGR) • InstituteofPlantProtection(IOR) • InstituteofMeteorologyandWaterManagement(IMGW) • InstituteofSoilScience andPlant Cultivation(IUNG) • ResearchInstituteofHorticulture Public bodies • WielkopolskaAgriculturalAdvisoryCentre(WODR) • WielkopolskaChamberofAgriculture(WIR) • InstituteofGeodesyandCartography(WODGiK) • RegionalAdvisoryCentres Business • ALMA SA • NetICTechSA • WielkopolskaICTCluster • GrupaAzotyZakładyAzotowePuławySA • Grześkowiak Reaching individual farmer is hard!
  8. 8. Identifying and engaging stakeholders Examples Wielkpolska Agricultural Advisory Center (WODR)  Tasks  Implementation of innovative solutions  Promoting good results in the region  training, presentations and demonstrations in farms  Network of demonstration farms ~ 100  Participate in the implementation of innovative solutions  Help to promote good results in the region  Different profiles  Animal Production Profiles  Plant Production Profiles  Open to students carrying out practices
  9. 9. Establishing collaboration and defining goals and scenarios Findingopportunitiesand developingprojectconcepts  PSNC established initial collaboration with WODR within FOODIE project  FOODIE (2014-2017) aims at building an open and interoperable agricultural specialized cloud- based platform for  The management, discovery and large-scale integration of data relevant for farming production, leveraging existing and valuable European open datasets  The publication and linking of data (following linked data principles) with external agriculture data sources contributed by different public and private stakeholders  The provision of specific and high-value applications and services supporting the planning and decision- making processes of different stakeholders related to the agricultural and environmental domains.
  10. 10. • FOODIE is developing threemain pilots – Pilot1: PrecisionViticulture(Spain –TerrasGauda) – Pilot2: OpenDataforStrategicandTacticalplanning (CzechRepublic –MGM) – Pilot3: Technologybasedintegrationoflogisticsviaserviceprovidersandfarmmanagementincluding traceability(Germany - machine cooperatives) • InPoland, PSNC subcontracted WODR to provide requirements from theregion and develop complementaryscenarios – Goal: • todevelopanagro-meteorologicalforecastsDSS • relatedtotheobligationofapplyingprinciplesofintegratedpestmanagementbyprofessionalusers ofplantprotectionproducts – Scenarios: • ScenarioA – Dataoncropandweatherdata. • ScenarioB – Modelingdiseasesandpests. • ScenarioC – Presentationofdataandcalculationresults. • ScenarioD –Notifications – Maindriverof requirementsforapplicationsdevelopedinPSNC Identifying regionalneeds Establishing collaboration and defining goals and scenarios
  11. 11. • PSNC has established collaboration with the University of Life Sciences in Poznan, Faculty of Agriculture and Bioengineering (PULS) – Ongoing collaboration within SmartAgriFood2 (SAF2) project serving both as proxy with regional farmers • SAF2 is a phase 3 FI-PPP project supporting SMEs in the development of smart services and applications for the agri-food sector with high end user take-up – based on FIWARE technologies, including Generic Enablers and FISPACE platform, and other results from previous FI-PPP projects – through an open call (4M€) for application development jointly coordinated with ICT-AGRI ERA-NET project – particularly for the arable, livestock and horticulture farming subsectors – Two phase programme • Phase 1 – 50 SMEs (Prototype development) – From over 150 applications • Phase 2 (Testbesd+Business Development) – 15 incubators, 3 high flyers More examples Establishing collaboration and defining goals and scenarios
  12. 12. • Wielkopolska Chamber of Agriculture (WIR) – Established communication – Requirements for farmers in the region • Consultants and former members of the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management (IMGW) Poznan branch – Established communication – Draft scenarios on water management: • Scenario A – Small water retention in delimited area. • Scenario B – Proper water conditions advise. • Scenario C – Maintenance of reclamation facilities and slow-flowing water streams in protection of environment • Scenario D – Impact of climate changes in the production over time • Industry partners in projects conceptualization and proposals preparation More examples Establishing collaboration and defining goals and scenarios
  13. 13. Setting up the base infrastructure • Foundations – Leveraging Polish e-Infrastructure • Providing high-speed communication links • Providing access to large scale national infrastructure, including virtualized resources – Exploiting HPC infrastructure at PSNC • Providing local computing power, network services, archiving systems • Providing operation of services • Some deployments at PSNC – Cloud infrastructure provider • FOODIE (and other projects) – FIWARE-lab node • SAF2 (and others) – IoT platforms and laboratory – Storage and computing power towards development of polish Elixir node
  14. 14. Setting up the infrastructure Example:FOODIEcloud infrastructure • Service model – Developers cloud: IaaS+ • Iaas – Openstack-based – 10 VM • DbaaS – Postgres-XL – Virtuoso – End-users cloud: SaaS • Include components developed in FOODIE alongwith any base technologies andextension modules • Deploymentmodel – Private cloud • PSNC HPC – Community/Mixed in the future Architecture
  15. 15. Setting up the infrastructure Example:FIWARE-labnode Architecture PSNCnode
  16. 16. • IoT platforms andservices development – KIWIPlatform – Hardware resources – Customization of3rdpartyplatforms Setting up the infrastructure Example:IoT platformandlaboratoryPSNC KIWI Platform • control and manage scientific equipment or sensors like cameras, weather, air pollution and water flows sensors and other • remotely control equipment • store gathered data • standard interfaces • based on OGC© standards • based on 52°North’s: SOS server and OX- Framework client adapters for SPS and SOS IoT Laboratory (hardware) • Sensors, microcontrollers, communication systems • Drones – multicopters and multispectral mapping flying wing (e.g. NDVI maps) • Horticulture sensors • Weather stations
  17. 17. Building, deploying and integrating datasets, servicesand applications • FOODIE Marketplace developed by PSNC – virtual space that connects consumers and producers of agricultural data and applications – for offering/selling resources – for enabling their collaboration – main driver: WODR • FOODIE geoportal developed by Czech partners – Inspire compliant registry of datasets – Visualization of data layer in maps – Main driver: Czech farmers • Smart apps developed by SMEs in SAF2 project – Deployed in FIWARE-lab (e.g., SmartSilo, Grocircle) – Supported by PSNC (technical & trailing in the region) • BII tools deployed at PSNC for – storage of phenotypic data in ISA-TAB format – main driver: IPG – PAS (pilot project) – Vision: creation of polish Elixir node Examples
  18. 18. Building, deploying and integrating datasets, servicesand applications • KiWI apps deployments – Animal road crossing monitoring – Measurement of the greenhouse gases – Phenological observations – Cold room monitoring • Resources at the region/national level to integrate – DSS on treatment of late potato blight (WODR) – DSS in protection against rust brown (IOR) – Meteo stations network (WODR/IOR/others) – Regional Knowledge base in agriculture (WODR) – Farmers statistics (Advisory centers) – Epidemic Disease Forecasting System (Plant Genetics) … Examples
  19. 19. Usertrialing and dissemination activities • Identification of potential trial sites in theregion – WODR’s network ofdemo farms – Farms varyon size (6-3200 ha), production type, andconditions – Enabling the communication between farmers andapplication developers • E.g.,SmartAgriFood project funds development of smart farmapps, now working on trials • Identification of relevant events in theregion – ~15 per yearwith participation of multiple farmers andother stakeholders – According toWODR the best wayto disseminate services/applications is at such events • Includetraining – On site • practical trainings, presentations and demonstrations in collaboration with the advisory centers – On events • conferences, seminars, workshops, etc. Initialsteps andexamples
  20. 20. Gaps and clustering opportunities ideas for discussion
  21. 21. Perspectivesof Agri-food chain • Conventional perspective of agri-foodchains is mostly market oriented andincludes all intermediaries who add value tothe farm output orthe transactions involving the output as it moves along the chain, through transport,processing and/or marketing. • The emerging perspectives of agri-foodchains can be considered in twostages – firststagethatisnowemergingfocuseson enablingbettermarket participationalongwithgreatersustainabilityofagriculture.Thisis thegoal forEuropeunderthecommon agriculturalpolicyand isbeing consideredall overtheworld. – thesecondstagewillevolveintoamore complex agri-foodchain whereinadditiontotheoutputslistedabove,qualitywater,energy andhigherqualityoflifein ruralareasandforthosein urbanareasare alsoconsideredasoutputsoftheseagri-foodchains Motivations
  22. 22. New information flow needs • Open data and technologies • Data andinformation repositories along with trust centers for managing, sharing and using it • Institutional, legislative and regulatorymechanisms fordata sharing, property rightsand fairuse • Increased democratization ofscience, learning andsupport toexponential innovation • Inclusive governance offlow ofdata,information, knowledge, skills and technology • Inclusive development ofstandards • Interoperable applications • Enabling capacities in communities touse information effectively • New formsofadvisory andsupport systems for knowledge, skills and technology using ICTs • New business-models that integrate governments, farmers,banks, insurance co., market intermediaries, cooperatives etc. for participation in markets • Public clouds infrastructures along with lower costs of connectivity andhardware Whatarewemissing (non-exhaustive list)
  23. 23. ICT directions with impact inAgri-Food sector • Technological – Dataanalyticsforagricultureandfarmingatplot/field,farm,farmclusters/village/watershed,national,regional levels – Visualizationofinformationfordecisionsupport – InternetofThingsenabledfarmequipment – New formoflabellingincludingprintable,organic/edible/degradableRFIDs – Wearablecomputingforfarmersandlivestock – MOOCsforlearninginfarmingandagriculturalcommunities – Abilitytolinkanduseunstructureddata • Institutional – Buildnew formsof informationandknowledgeservicescooperatives – Dataandinformationsharingtreatieswithregulatorymechanismsandappropriatelegislature – Opengovernment(Governance,Health,Education, Infrastructureetc.) – Communityparticipation – Social media – Participatorymovementssuchasformappingresourcesand servicesofa community,Foodquality, reducedwastage,sustainabilityandsafety relatedepidemiology – Communitybasedcontentgeneration How to fill gaps withparticipationofmultipleactors(non-exhaustivelist) Smart-farming + smart village = Smart rural area + Smart city = Smart country
  24. 24. PoznańSupercomputingandNetworkingCenter ul. Noskowskiego 12/14, 61-704 Poznań, POLAND, Office: phone center: (+48 61) 858-20-00, fax: (+48 61) 852-59-54, e-mail: office@man.poznan.pl, http://www.psnc.pl affiliatedto theInstituteof BioorganicChemistryof the PolishAcademyof Sciences,

Notas do Editor

  • regarding the agri-food sector, PSNC has focussed part of its efforts during the last years towards the development of a smart agriculture infrastructure in Wielkopolska region
  • the agri-food sector can be characterized as a rather complex ecosystem involving multiple stakeholders and activities that need to have access and manage many different and heterogeneous sources of information, typically through multiple applications and devices. For instance, typical farm activities include the monitoring of field operations, managing the farm finances, budget and staff, and communicating with the local/regional governmental bodies to apply for subsidies, to pay taxes, and to get information about regulations at the regional/national/EU level. Similarly, farmers typically interact with advisory bodies to receive counseling and recommendations, or with research and academic entities that would like to conduct trials and bring new innovative ideas into the field. They also need to interact with different suppliers (fertilizers, chemicals, machinery, combustible, etc.), with their neighbors, and with the buyers of their products that move them along the agri-food chain, through transport, processing and/or marketing to the final consumption. Hence, it is important to identify and involve key relevant stakeholders in the region covering the overall ecosystem. However, it is important to note that in our experience reaching individual farmer is a difficult task (e.g., lack of trust) and rather not efficient (e.g., not scalable); thus the most effective way to reach them is through the entities that they trust (e.g., advisory bodies)
  • Once identified key stakeholders, we need to start concrete collaborations with them. This usually involves finding funding opportunities and building some project concept, usually involving multiple actors. As part of this work, its important to define the goals of the collaboration. In our experience, based on these goals, a set of scenarios (use cases) are then defined to clarify the issues to be addressed in small and measurable tasks.
  • The key to enable a faster development of applications is to have in place a good infrastructure. This includes fast communication links and scalable infrastructure with high-availability policies enabling developers to focus on the development and integration tasks, and providing a good experience to the end users. In PSNC, having a strategic position in Poland, we can leverage the polish e-Infrastructure where we play a central role, including high-speed communication links and access to large scale national infrastructure involving archiving systems, network services, virtualized resources and others; and in particular we can exploit PSNC’s own HPC facilities that can be used for providing cloud solutions, virtualized resources and operation of services, especially at the regional level. PSNC acts as infrastructure provider in multiple projects and initiatives, like FOODIE (Farm oriented open data in Europe) project and FIWARE-lab where each node provides virtualized resources to end-users (typically SMEs) for deploying FIWARE technologies (particularly Generic Enablers) in order to build FIWARE-enabled applications and services quickly and without worrying on setting up the environment and having enough resources.
  • Service model
    Developers cloud
    Iaas+
    End-users cloud
    SaaS
    Deployment model
    Private cloud
    HPC at PSNC
    Community/Mixed in the future
    Currently: 10 VMs
  • With the right infrastructure in place, we can now work on the implementation of services and applications, and/or on the deployment of existing tools, which will be needed to provide smart solutions to the farmers. An important aspect here is to involve the end-users and stakeholders during this process to provide requirements and to provide feedback.

    Features
    Search and find datasets, services and applications
    Publish datasets, services and applications
    Support different access methods (free, paid, vouchers, etc.)
    Integration with billing services
    Social features
    User management
    Integration with Semantic Annotation Service

    WODR driving user requirements

    BII-Manager: application that validates ISA-Tab formatted reports and persist encoded information to database backend
    BII Web application: database front-end


  • Features
    Search and find datasets, services and applications
    Publish datasets, services and applications
    Support different access methods (free, paid, vouchers, etc.)
    Integration with billing services
    Social features
    User management
    Integration with Semantic Annotation Service

    WODR driving user requirements

    BII-Manager: application that validates ISA-Tab formatted reports and persist encoded information to database backend
    BII Web application: database front-end


  • the purpose of this activity is to test and refine it in a test bed environment. Usually this would be an iterative process, where the the prototype is increasingly improved. In our experience, one of the best approaches for this is to follow an agile development methodology, where prototypes are built iteratively and incrementally through the continuous evolution of requirements and solutions, stimulating the collaboration between the development team, researchers and end-users. In order to conduct the trials, its important to identify potential sites (farms) in the region, willing to participate in the implementation of innovative solutions. In our case, we aim at leveraging the network of demo farms built by the regional advisory body.
    to promote the activities and results in the region to create awareness and reach a significant number of end-users and other relevant stakeholders. This would require the identification of relevant events in the region, and to include training activities
  • As it has been analysed within FOODIE project, emerging perspectives of agri-food chains will require more complex commodity and financial flows to comply with increasing regulatory requirements for food safety, energy, waste management, recycling and the environment. This will also lead to increased information collection and flow complexity and needs for using ICTs

    Conventional:
    While the commodity and financial flows are mostly linear from farm through market to consumption, but flowing in opposite direction, information flows are more complex

    Stage 1
    Under such perspective the outputs from the chain now include more availability, access, affordability of nutritious, healthy food and cheaper industrial feedstock/commodities with lesser degradation and more rejuvenation of the environment and conservation of socio-cultural rural heritage.
    Commodity and financial flows become more complex so as to adhere to increased regulatory requirements for food safety, energy, waste management and the environment. There is greater enforcement for reduction of wastage and for recycling. Information flows also become more complex and integrated especially for assuring safety of food especially bringing greater traceability and identity preservation through labelling and in sync with commodity and financial flows
    Stage 2
    More complex commodity and financial flows in European agri-food chains will thus have to comply with in-creasing regulatory requirements for food safety, energy, waste management, recycling and the environment. This may lead to increased information collection and flow and in the needs to use ICTs. There will be calls for greater integration of information flows that include data and information on biomass, water and other natural resources across the agri-food chains to achieve whole systems efficiencies. Current technologies indicate how the new ICTs and information flows would emerge in this perspective around use of sensors, sensor networks, big data at plot, field, farm, village, region levels on large data clouds, advanced analytics, the Internet of Things etc.

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