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Visual Frameworks and Models

Presented to VizThink Dallas in February 2012. Offered as a deep dive into ways that we can organize ideas into more powerful messages that can sell or persuade others.

Big idea: "String together frameworks or models to sell a big idea... or simply persuade others to open up."

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Visual Frameworks and Models

  1. 1. Visual Frameworks and Models Paul Goode#VizThink VizThink Dallas
  2. 2. String together frameworks or models to sell a bigidea... or simply persuade others to open up.
  3. 3. James MacanufoVisual Frameworkshttp://www.viznotes.com/ 45 Examples
  4. 4. Visual frameworks are for exploring,organizing and communicatinginformation.Processes, progressions, sequencesNodes connected in flows of varying complexity.Meaning is derived from order.
  5. 5. GroupingsAffinities, categories, comparisonsNodes and other nodes - Nodes without explicit connections, order or sequence. Meaning derived fromtheir individual properties and spatial relationship to each other.StructuresNetworks, hierarchies, systems.Nodes with explicit connections and relationships, where flow is absent, secondary or implied. Meaning isderived from connections.FlowsProcesses, progressions, sequencesNodes connected in flows of varying complexity. Meaning is derived from order.MetaphorsCommon visual archetypes
  6. 6. Random. Nodes with no discernible affinity or relationship. The starting point and ending point.Homogenous; white noise. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  7. 7. "Toy soliders." Nodes that are identical save one attribute. Demonstrates variation on a theme;diversity of function. Examples: UI Buttons, tokens Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  8. 8. Clusters. Nodes grouped by affinity. The first step in emerging forms and patterns. These smallcenters of gravity will attract other nodes and become something larger. Example: Animal, Vegetable,or Mineral Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  9. 9. "Venn Diagram." Nodes that share a set of attributes and retain unique properties. Demonstrates amerging of interests, activities or responsibilities. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  10. 10. Collective action. Nodes that combine in function or direction. Elements retain individual identitywhile demonstrating integrated, aligned activities. Examples: Gears, Flock of Birds, Rowing the Boat Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  11. 11. A system with no center, where nodes can freely relate to each other. May be partially connected orfully meshed. Decisions and influence are dispersed. Any one node of the network may fail withoutsubstantial impact to the system. Example: the Internet Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  12. 12. "Puzzle pieces." Nodes that combine to a whole without an explicit hierarchy or relationship.Demonstrates unity but not function. Emphasis is on whole; the parts are secondary. Examples:bricks, puzzle Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  13. 13. A hierarchical network in which all nodes relate to each other only through the center. Any outer nodemay fail without impacting the network, but the central node must remain intact. Example: Spider Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  14. 14. Butcher view. An abstract representation of parts of the whole. Emphasis is on area and neighbors. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  15. 15. Missing Piece. Metaphor of structure or grouping with focus on one piece. Demonstrates need forcompletion; there is something that we forgot, or need to complete the whole. Example: keystone Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  16. 16. Exploded view. Nested grouping of nodes of the whole. The engineers blueprint; parts broken apartfor examination. Emphasis is on parts; the whole is not easily discernible. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  17. 17. Matrix. Compare meaning of nodes. Demonstrates need for analytical and planning work. Example:2x2 Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  18. 18. "Links in the chain." Failure of any one node may cause the failure of the entire network, unless it"heals" itself. Likewise, each node reinforces the strength of all others. Examples: Starfish, cellmembrane, token ring Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  19. 19. A simple network of sequential connections with a terminus at both ends. Nodes relate to each otherthrough this linear chain of connections. Any break in the chain may cause the entire system to fail, orto create two smaller networks. Examples: earthworm Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  20. 20. "Metro map." An abstract, simplified representation of a network in sequential nodes and links.Emphasis on routing, not location. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  21. 21. "Onion Skin." Hierarchy of expanding attributes. Answers: What is core, and what is peripheral?Examples: Dart board Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  22. 22. X-Ray view. Realistic or metaphorical view of the internal workings of system. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  23. 23. "Route map." An abstract representation of a network of nodes and links in a circular arrangement.Emphasis on connections, not location. Example: Enneagram Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  24. 24. "Vision." "Wedding cake." Loose hierarchy of construction. Demonstrates building toward anendpoint. Examples: pyramid org chart, vision structure. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  25. 25. "Layer cake." also "Core Sample." Loose hierarchy of construction. Demonstrates adjacent areas offunction or order. Often answers: Whats the foundation? Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  26. 26. "Fishbone diagram." Hierarchy of problems linking up to the root cause. The fish "stinks from thehead." Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  27. 27. All points may freely associate with each other, agnostic of geography. Compare to mesh network. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  28. 28. "Natures ladder." Hierarchy of order. Each node in the system has a parent, except for the root.Example: Tree Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  29. 29. Iceberg. Metaphor. Most important issues are unseen beneath the surface. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  30. 30. "Nesting dolls." Hierarchy of containers. Often identical outside of size, each retains the properties ofthe set. Demonstrates growth or reduction through duplication. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  31. 31. "Timeline." Nodes ordered along a single continuum, usually by time. Emphasis is on order, planning,but also story and sequence. Demonstrates simplicity of action, known events; transactions. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  32. 32. "Swim lanes." Multiple timelines ordered along a continuum; may emphasize dependencies betweenthem. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  33. 33. Sequence. Linear story, interpreted in framed events. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  34. 34. Spectrum. Define two extremes to frame the matter at hand. Choices made within a spectrum are notbinary, but fall along the continuum. Example: Forcefield Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  35. 35. Steps. Incremental improvement or progress. Laborious but well defined effort. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  36. 36. Infinite loop. Variation of iteration, with implied inflection point at the meeting of the two loops. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  37. 37. Broadcast. Pushing out from a center. May involve breaking up parts of the original form. Sharingwith the outside, radiate. Examples: Colonize, Transmit, Message. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  38. 38. "Uroboros." Repeating sequence of nodes. The last node in the sequence triggers the restart of theflow. Demonstrates unity, sustainability of action, repetition. Examples: Clock face, "cradle to cradle" Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  39. 39. Spiral. Logarithmic growth out from or winding down into a center of mass. The "seed" or "blackhole" at the center shapes the flow of the line, which is always accelerating. See also: death spiral. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  40. 40. Sankey. Demonstrates quantity of flow in a system. Branches may converge and diverge freely.Example: River Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  41. 41. "Uroboros." Repeating sequence of nodes. The last node in the sequence triggers the restart of theflow. Demonstrates unity, sustainability of action, repetition. Examples: Clock face, "cradle to cradle" Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  42. 42. "Pitfall." The way ahead is fraught with dangers and obstacles. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  43. 43. "Six million dollar man." The blueprint for idealized success or failure. See also: X-Ray Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  44. 44. Bridge. Metaphorical steps to the future. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  45. 45. "Pipeline." An unordered flow is slowed to a regular pace as nodes are ordered and directed. Inreality, all will eventually move through a funnel. Compare to Filter. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  46. 46. Branching path. One to many. A singular flow splits into multiple; demonstrates choices, division offorces, plan of attack or progress. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  47. 47. "Links in the chain." Failure of any one node may cause the failure of the entire network, unless it"heals" itself. Likewise, each node reinforces the strength of all others. Examples: Starfish, cellmembrane, token ring Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  48. 48. Also "Donkey Kong." Metaphor. Two steps forward and one step back. Progress is slowed by errorsand bad luck. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  49. 49. Transformation. Create a new form by changing or destroying the old. May imply change in shape,function, purpose. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  50. 50. Converge. Pushing into a center. May involve creating a new form. Centralizing, solidifying, emerging.Examples: Merger, Pressurize. Key: G=Group S=Structure F=Flow M=Metaphor
  51. 51. In the most general sense, a model isanything used in any way to representanything else.Some models are physical objects, for instance, a toymodel which may be assembled, and may even bemade to work like the object it represents. They areused to help us know and understand the subjectmatter they represent.
  52. 52. Sorry. Don’t know the source, but grabbed from Google Images.Modeling a building.
  53. 53. Experience Business Technology Bill Buxton Principle Researcher, MicrosoftBill Buxton talks about a concept of Business, Experience and Technology (BXT) working togetherto realize an innovative design. http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/jul2009/id20090713_332802.htm
  54. 54. Interior designers model with sketches.
  55. 55. Brainstorming can model/map out ideas.
  56. 56. Modeling user-centric features in an application.
  57. 57. Comic - three frames to tell a small story.
  58. 58. Dave GrayConnected Companyhttp://connectedco.com/
  59. 59. Dave Gray recently presented a series of frameworks and models during a Connected Companypresentation. Big idea: strung together, with knowledge and stories, these simple drawings becomepowerful and persuasive. http://new.livestream.com/smwnybiz/DGrayTheConnectedCompany
  60. 60. String together frameworks or models to sell a bigidea... or simply persuade others to open up.
  61. 61. ReferencesJames MacanufoVisual FrameworksDave GrayConnected CompanyEverything politely stolen from these fellows. Go check out their work.

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