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Managing diversity in workplace mod 4

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module 4
Kerala University mba

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Managing diversity in workplace mod 4

  1. 1. 1 Unit IV: Managing Diversity - Ethical, Legal and Communication issues - Ethics of workplace diversity – Legal aspects of diversity in workplace. Improving communication in today‟s diverse workplace. Managing Diversity Ethical issues in workplace: 1. Misusing company time (Conducting Personal Business on Company Time) Because employees tend to spend so much of their weekday hours on the job, they often are tempted to conduct personal business on company time. This can include setting up doctor's appointments on company phone lines, making vacation reservations using their employer's computers and Internet connections or even making phone calls for a freelance side business while on company time. 2. Abusive behavior Too many workplaces are filled with managers and supervisors who use their position and power to mistreat or disrespect others. Unfortunately, unless the situation you're in involves race, gender or ethnic origin, there is often no legal protection against abusive behavior in the workplace. 3. Employee theft (Stealing on the Job) According to a recent study by Jack L. Hayes International, one out of every 40 employees in 2012 was caught stealing from their employer. We all know embezzling from the company -- taking money and hiding it by altering the records -- is against the law. But what about taking home an occasional box of staples? Just because the supply room is well stocked with boxes of everyone's favorite pens doesn't mean its okay for employees to help themselves to a pack for home. It may seem like a small thing, but when every employee takes something, it does add up against company profits. It is stealing, and an astute office manager will notice things going missing too fast. 4. Lying to employees The fastest way to lose the trust of your employees is to lie to them, yet employers do it all the time. One of out every five employees report that their manager or supervisor has lied to them within the past year. 5. Violating company internet policies Cyber slackers, Cyber loafers. These are terms used to identify people who surf the Web when they should be working. It's a huge, multi-billion-dollar problem for companies. 6. Taking Credit for Others' Work
  2. 2. 2 7. Harassing Behavior Employees often don't know what to do if they see one of their co-workers harassing another employee, either mentally, sexually or physically. Employees may worry for their jobs if they attempt to report a superior for harassment. They may fret that they'll be labeled a troublemaker if they report co-workers who display inappropriate behavior toward other employees. 9. Proactive Employers Many unethical workplace behaviors can be stopped early on or before they start by employers letting the staff knows what the company considers to be unethical. Someone who takes home a few pens may not think of that as stealing until it's pointed out to them. Many people don't realize their attempts at humor could be offensive to others, or that hopping on the internet is an abuse of company time because "everyone does it." 10. Unethical leadership 11. Toxic workplace culture 12. Discrimination and harassment How to Handle Ethical Issues in the Workplace Ethics starts with the basic assumptions all employees live according to basic moral guidelines and conduct themselves in the work environment accordingly. !o matter the size of a company, unethical behavior can cripple the company‟s ability to attract customers, be approved for creditor maintain business partnerships. 1ifferent organizations and 2obs may have different ethical issues arise and require a set standard of ethics. Morality and values-based dilemmas in the workplace are, at best, difficult to handle when employees have to choose between what‟s right and what‟s wrong according to their own principles. Forward-thinking employers who implement workplace ethics policies are usually well-prepared for the potential conflicts of interest that arise due to the diversity of opinion, values and culture in the workforce. However, handling ethical issues in the workplace requires a steady and cautious approach to matters which can potentially be dangerous or illegal. 1. Know the Law Research the federal, state and municipal labor and employment laws pertaining to whistle blowing. Refrain from making employment decisions, such as termination or suspension, in connection with whistle blowing or an employee‟s right to protected activity under whistle blowing laws or public policy. Seek legal advice for employee reports of workplace ethics issues that increase your organization‟s liability under federal, state or municipal employment law. 2. Set Expectations Develop a workplace policy based on your company‟s philosophy, mission statement and code of conduct. Incorporate the policy into your performance management program to hold employees accountable for their actions and alert them to their responsibilities to uphold professional standards throughout their job performance and interaction with peers and supervisors. Revise your employee handbook to include the policy and provide copies of the revised handbook to employees. Obtain signed
  3. 3. 3 acknowledgement forms from employees that indicate they received and understand the workplace ethics policy. 3. Train Your Employees Provide workplace ethics training to employees. Utilize varied instruction methods to engage employees in learning how to address and resolve ethical dilemmas. Experiential learning, or role-play, is an effective way to facilitate workplace ethics training. Examples of workplace ethics simulations involve scenarios about the misappropriation of company funds, personal values related to improper workplace relationships and the organization‟s compliance with regulatory controls. 4. Put Someone in Charge Designate an ombudsperson in charge of handling employees‟ informal concerns pertaining to workplace ethics. Consider whether your organization also needs an ethics hotline, which is a confidential service employees may contact whenever they encounter workplace dilemmas that put them into uncomfortable or threatening positions. Confidential hotlines are an effective way to assure employees‟ anonymity, which is a concern for employees whose alerts are considered “whistle blowing” actions. 5. Be Fair Apply your workplace policy consistently when addressing workplace issues and employee concerns about workplace ethics. Use the same business principles in every circumstance, regardless of the perceived seriousness or the level of employees involved. Communicate the same expectations for all employees – whether they are in executive positions or front-line production roles – and approach every issue with equal interpretation of the company policy. 6. Integrate ethics in your corporate culture. Pay more attention to the values statement when reviewing your company's mission statement. Adopt a corporate code of conduct. Less formally, talk about ethical issues and how they were handled, for good or bad, at staff meetings, corporate events and training sessions. Sometimes, owning up to lapses can be one of the best ways to drive home the point.  Develop a workplace policy based on your company‟s philosophy, mission statement and code of conduct. Incorporate the policy into your performance evaluation program to hold employees accountable for their actions and alert them to their responsibilities to uphold professional standards throughout their job performance and interaction with peers and supervisors. Revise your employee handbook to include the policy and provide copies of the revised handbook to employees. Obtain signed acknowledgement forms from employees that indicate they received and understand the workplace ethics policy.  Provide workplace ethics training to employees. Utilize varied instruction methods to engage employees in learning how to address and resolve ethical dilemmas. Experiential learning, or role-play, is an effective way to facilitate workplace ethics training. Examples of workplace ethics simulations involve scenarios about the misappropriation of company funds, personal
  4. 4. 4 values related to improper workplace relationships and the organization‟s compliance with regulatory controls.  Designate an ombudsperson in charge of handling employees‟ informal concerns pertaining to workplace ethics. Consider whether your organization also needs an ethics hotline, which is a confidential service employees may contact whenever they encounter workplace dilemmas that put them into uncomfortable or threatening positions. Confidential hotlines are an effective way to assure employees‟ anonymity, which is a concern for employees whose alerts are considered “whistle blowing” actions.  Apply your workplace policy consistently when addressing workplace issues and employee concerns about workplace ethics. Use the same business principles in every circumstance, regardless of the perceived seriousness or the level of employees involved. Communicate the same expectations for all employees – whether they are in executive positions or front-line production roles – and approach every issue with equal interpretation of the company policy. An ethical organization environment is essential in today‟s workplace culture where pressure exists to meet financial goals and conflicts occur more frequently including those fueled by the use of social media. Without a commitment by top management to „walk the talk of ethics,” an organization can morph into ethical relativism where my ethics are my ethics and your ethics are your ethics and never the two shall meet.  Benefits of Managing Ethics in the Workplace Many people are used to reading or hearing of the moral benefits of attention to business ethics. However, there are other types of benefits, as well. The following list describes various types of benefits from managing ethics in the workplace. 1. Attention to business ethics has substantially improved society. A matter of decades ago, people worked 16-hour days. Workers‟ limbs were torn off and disabled workers were condemned to poverty and often to starvation. Trusts controlled some markets to the extent that prices were fixed and small businesses choked out. Price fixing crippled normal market forces. Employees were terminated based on personalities. Influence was applied through intimidation and harassment. Then society reacted and demanded that businesses place high value on fairness and equal rights. Anti-trust laws were instituted. Government agencies were established. Unions were organized. Laws and regulations were established. 2. Ethics programs help maintain a moral course in turbulent times. During times of change, there is often no clear moral compass to guide leaders through complex conflicts about what is right or wrong. Continuing attention to ethics in the workplace sensitizes leaders and staff to how they want to act -- consistently. 3. Ethics programs cultivate strong teamwork and productivity. Ethics programs align employee behaviors with those top priority ethical values preferred by leaders of the organization. Usually, an organization finds surprising disparity between its
  5. 5. 5 preferred values and the values actually reflected by behaviors in the workplace. Ongoing attention and dialogue regarding values in the workplace builds openness, integrity and community -- critical ingredients of strong teams in the workplace. Employees feel strong alignment between their values and those of the organization. They react with strong motivation and performance. 4. Ethics programs support employee growth and meaning. Attention to ethics in the workplace helps employees face reality, both good and bad -- in the organization and themselves. Employees feel full confidence they can admit and deal with whatever comes their way. 5. Ethics programs are an insurance policy -- they help ensure that policies are legal. There are an increasing number of lawsuits in regard to personnel matters and to effects of an organization‟s services or products on stakeholders. Ethical principles are often state-of-the-art legal matters. These principles are often applied to current, major ethical issues to become legislation. Attention to ethics ensures highly ethical policies and procedures in the workplace. 6. Ethics programs help avoid criminal acts “of omission” and can lower fines. Ethics programs tend to detect ethical issues and violations early on so they can be reported or addressed. In some cases, when an organization is aware of an actual or potential violation and does not report it to the appropriate authorities, this can be considered a criminal act, e.g., in business dealings with certain government agencies, such as the Defense Department.. 7. Ethics programs help manage values associated with quality management, strategic planning and diversity management -- this benefit needs far more attention. Ethics programs identify preferred values and ensuring organizational behaviors are aligned with those values. This effort includes recording the values, developing policies and procedures to align behaviors with preferred values, and then training all personnel about the policies and procedures. This overall effort is very useful for several other programs in the workplace that require behaviors to be aligned with values, including quality management, strategic planning and diversity management. Total Quality Management includes high priority on certain operating values, e.g., trust among stakeholders, performance, reliability, measurement, and feedback. 8. Ethics programs promote a strong public image. Attention to ethics is also strong public relations -- admittedly, managing ethics should not be done primarily for reasons of public relations. But, frankly, the fact that an organization regularly gives attention to its ethics can portray a strong positive to the public. People see those organizations as valuing people more than profit, as striving to operate with the utmost of integrity and honor. Aligning behavior with values is critical to effective marketing and public relations programs.
  6. 6. 6 9. Overall benefits of ethics programs: Managing ethical values in the workplace legitimizes managerial actions, strengthens the coherence and balance of the organization‟s culture, improves trust in relationships between individuals and groups, supports greater consistency in standards and qualities of products, and cultivates greater sensitivity to the impact of the enterprise‟s values and messages.  Guidelines for Managing Ethics in the Workplace The following guidelines ensure the ethics management program is operated in a meaningful fashion: 1. Recognize that managing ethics is a process. Ethics is a matter of values and associated behaviors. Values are discerned through the process of ongoing reflection. Therefore, ethics programs may seem more process-oriented than most management practices. Managers tend to be skeptical of process-oriented activities, and instead prefer processes focused on deliverables with measurements. However, experienced managers realize that the deliverables of standard management practices (planning, organizing, motivating, controlling) are only tangible representations of very process-oriented practices. For example, the process of strategic planning is much more important than the plan produced by the process. The same is true for ethics management. Ethics programs do produce deliverables, e.g., codes, policies and procedures, budget items, meeting minutes, authorization forms, newsletters, etc. However, the most important aspect from an ethics management program is the process of reflection and dialogue that produces these deliverables. 2. The bottom line of an ethics program is accomplishing preferred behaviors in the workplace. As with any management practice, the most important outcome is behaviors preferred by the organization. The best of ethical values and intentions are relatively meaningless unless they generate fair and just behaviors in the workplace. That's why practices that generate lists of ethical values, or codes of ethics, must also generate policies, procedures and training that translate those values to appropriate behaviors. 3. The best way to handle ethical dilemmas is to avoid their occurrence in the first place. That's why practices such as developing codes of ethics and codes of conduct are so important. Their developments sensitize employees to ethical considerations and minimize the chances of unethical behavior occurring in the first place. 4. Make ethics decisions in groups, and make decisions public, as appropriate. This usually produces better quality decisions by including diverse interests and perspectives, and increases the credibility of the decision process and outcome by reducing suspicion of unfair bias.
  7. 7. 7 5. Integrate ethics management with other management practices. When developing the values statement during strategic planning, include ethical values preferred in the workplace. When developing personnel policies, reflect on what ethical values you'd like to be most prominent in the organization's culture and then design policies to produce these behaviors. 6. Use cross-functional teams when developing and implementing the ethics management program. It‟s vital that the organization‟s employees feel a sense of participation and ownership in the program if they are to adhere to its ethical values. Therefore, include employees in developing and operating the program. 7. Value forgiveness. This may sound rather religious or preachy to some, but it‟s probably the most important component of any management practice. An ethics management program may at first actually increase the number of ethical issues to be dealt with because people are more sensitive to their occurrence. Consequently, there may be more occasions to address people‟s unethical behavior. The most important ingredient for remaining ethical is trying to be ethical. Therefore, help people recognize and address their mistakes and then support them to continue to try operate ethically. Legal issues  Employment Discrimination Discrimination is a broad term that applies to many different possible interactions and is one of the most common legal issues in the workplace. Discrimination differs from domestic violence in the work place; hence you should know what to look for. When employers hire unfairly based on race, gender, religion, age or national origin, they open themselves up to liability and potential lawsuits. Additionally, harassment resulting from discrimination based on these traits can induce complicated legal headaches and result in a negative public image.  Worker’s Compensation When employees become injured on the job, businesses are often responsible and find themselves dealing with the cost of supporting an injured and out of work employee while tip-toeing around the legal intricacies involved. The potential for lawsuits based on negligence is also high.  Copyright and Intellectual Property Issues Copyright law is complex and rigorously detailed, making it a common place for potential legal issues in the workplace. Many cutting-edge technology companies fall into this trap when developing new products simply out of ignorance. Doing the requisite research should prevent businesses from falling prey to this legal workplace issue.  Product Defects If a defect is discovered in a product after distribution, businesses may be liable for negligence and other complications, often finding them defending class action lawsuits from their disgruntled customers.
  8. 8. 8 These legal battles can damage a company financially, but most importantly the reputation lost from negative exposure can be lethal.  Immigration Audits When a business fails to verify that all of its employees are able to legally work in the U.S., it opens itself up to myriad legal issues in the workplace. By thoroughly and regularly checking the legality of each employee‟s documentation, businesses safeguard themselves against surprise immigration checks. If illegal workers are discovered at a company, the resulting fines and legal headaches can cripple a business.  Dissatisfied Customers Customers who are dissatisfied can file class action lawsuits against your company, in which they gather in large consumer groups and attack your company over faulty products, services or promises. With enough dissatisfied customers, class action lawsuits can do more damage than any individual or corporation and irreparably tarnish your brand's image.  Legal aspects in workplace Diversity in the Workplace is a people issue, which focuses on the similarities and differences between people in an organization. Diversity in the workplace is typically defined largely to include different aspects beyond those legally specified in affirmative action non-discrimination statutes and equal opportunity. Because of many pieces of legislation on the federal and state level, discrimination is illegal in workplaces equal opportunity laws make discrimination in workplaces illegal. These laws discuss the rights along with the responsibilities of both employers as well as employees in the workplace, making both of them accountable. Diversity in the workplace is most often explained to include different aspects that influence an individual‟s identity and point of view, such as education, parental status, profession, and geographic location. It also includes cultural diversity that creates a unique identity, which includes race, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, and ethnicity. Legislation that Promotes Diversity in the Workplace 1. Title VII Civil Rights Act (1964) 2. Pregnancy Discrimination Act 3. Americans with Disabilities Act (1990) 4. ADA Amendments Act 5. Age Discrimination in Employment Act (1969) 6. Equal Pay Act (1963) 7. Employment and Reemployment Rights Act 8. Civil Rights Act (1991) 9. Rehabilitation Act (1973) 10. Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (2008)
  9. 9. 9  Equal Pay Act of 1963 The Equal Pay Act requires that women who do the same job as men, in the same organization, must receive the same pay. It defines equal in terms of “equal skill, effort, and responsibility, and . . . performed under similar working conditions.”6 However, if pay differences are the result of differences in seniority, merit, quantity or quality of production, or any factor other than sex (e.g., shift differentials and training programs), then pay differences are legally allowable  Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA) The ADEA prohibits discrimination against employees age 40 or older, so it added the “protected class” of age. In this case, it applies if the organization has 20 or more workers instead of 15  Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 (PDA) The Pregnancy Discrimination Act prohibits discrimination against women affected by pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions as unlawful sex discrimination  Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) Amended in 2008 .The ADA is one of the most significant employment laws passed in the United States. It prohibits discrimination based on disability in all employment practices, such as job application procedures, hiring, firing, promotions, compensation, and training. It applies to virtually all employers with 15 or more employees.  Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (CRA) This act changed the way that virtually every organization in the country did business, and it also helped change employers‟ attitudes about discrimination. The 1964 CRA states that it is illegal for an employer (1) to fail or refuse to hire or to discharge any individual, or otherwise to discriminate against any individual with respect to his compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment, because of such individual‟s race, color, religion, sex, or national origin; or (2) to limit, segregate, or classify his employees or applicants for employment in any way which would deprive or tend to deprive any individual of employment opportunities or otherwise adversely affect his status as an employee, because of such individual‟s race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.”8 The act applies to organizations with 15 or more employees who are working 20 or more weeks a year and who are involved in interstate commerce. The law also generally applies to state and local governments; educational institutions, public or private; all employment agencies; and all labor associations of any type.  Types of Discrimination. The 1964 CRA identified three types of discrimination. The three types: disparate treatment; disparate impact; and pattern or practice. Disparate (Adverse) Treatment Disparate treatment exists when individuals in similar situations are intentionally treated differently and the different treatment is based on an individual’s membership in a protected class. Disparate (Adverse) Impact
  10. 10. 10 Disparate impact occurs when an officially neutral employment practice disproportionately excludes the members of a protected group; it is generally considered to be unintentional, but intent is irrelevant. Pattern or Practice Pattern or practice discrimination occurs when a person or group engages in a sequence of actions over a significant period of time that is intended to deny the rights provided by Title VII of the 1964 CRA to a member of a protected class.  Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) “prohibits the use of genetic information in employment, prohibits the intentional acquisition of genetic information about applicants and employees, and imposes strict confidentiality requirements.”  Rehabilitation Act 1973 The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination based on a person‟s disability in any program or activity that receives federal funding. It also covers disability discrimination in employment with federal agencies, in programs that are conducted by federal agencies, and with federal contractors.  Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) of 1994 Ensures the civilian reemployment rights of military members who were called away from their regular (nonmilitary) jobs by US government orders‟  Civil Rights Act of 1991 Strengthened civil rights by providing for possible compensatory and punitive damages for discrimination  Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin in all areas of the employment relationship Many state and local governments have also enacted different equal employment measures, for example those that forbid discrimination due to on sexual orientation. Furthermore, employers cannot fire, harass, demote, or otherwise retaliate against an employee for a discrimination charge, opposing discrimination, or acting in a discrimination proceeding. This is to cover victims and those who take action against discrimination Communication issues Language and culture challenges need to be conquered and diversity cannot succeed without resolving the feelings that surround these issues. Ineffective team communication consumes precious productivity timelines and compromises project management deadlines, which ultimately fosters low team morale. Facilitating trustworthy communication from leadership across diverse employees helps the team grow closer as they strive for success in their work efforts.
  11. 11. 11 It‟s better to invest in sensitivity training as a prevention strategy than to wait until after acts of discrimination have occurred. Teaching others how to appreciate different views, know what is or is not offensive, communicate with respect regardless of who they are speaking to, and mend rifts in employee relationships affected by discrimination will be invaluable to maintaining a diverse culture within your organization. Make sure that sensitivity training is mandatory for all existing employees and new hires regardless of their reporting level. Problem One: Lack of Standards When communication problems in the workplace lower standards, it's usually because you lack consistency on how and when employees communicate. It's a good idea to establish a communication policy to standardize the methods used for communicating with both colleagues and customers. Avoid relying too heavily on one type of communication. For example, using only verbal communication makes tracking conversations and information difficult. Problem Two: Communication Barriers Differences in background or experience cause barriers between some employees. Without some common ground, employees may find relating to or understand what other staff members are talking about difficult. Cultural differences may also cause difficulties in non-verbal communications, causing mixed messages. Problem Three: Mixing Work and Personal Communications Some employees tend to mix personal lives into the workplace communications. Personal communications detract from the professionalism in the office, which sometimes leads to gossip in the workplace, leading to decreased morale or even accusations of harassment. Problem Four: Misinterpretations and Assumptions Communication is open to interpretation and is sometimes interpreted incorrectly. People often make assumptions based on the information they hear or read, whether or not they hear or read it correctly. Nonverbal cues also lead people to make assumptions that can impede communication. For example, an employee who avoids eye contact may cause others to assume she is hiding something when she may simply feel inferior or shy. Problem Five: Poor Listening Skills Sharing information is only part of the communication process. Strong listening skills are essential to effectively communicating and understanding the message being shared. Employees who fail to listen or who don't know how to actively listen to their colleagues are likely to miss information or not know what is going on. Problem Six: Lack of Factual Communication Factually-based communication is essential to effective communication in the workplace. If employees communicate false information or share information they aren't sure about, they are likely to cause
  12. 12. 12 delays in task completion. Managers who share false information or share information without verifying it first are likely to upset the employees. Problem Seven: Failure to Disperse Communications Dispersing workplace communications often relies on a chain of employees sharing the information with others. In some cases, the relay of information is interrupted, leaving certain employees out of the loop. The breakdown in communication may lead to wasted time, missed meetings, duplication of work, or other disruptions of the workflow. Problem Eight: Privacy Concerns Very little communication is actually private, especially in a workplace environment. Verbal communication is easily overheard by others in the office. Email messages and instant messaging on the computer are susceptible to hacking. Other employees may read over your shoulder and see confidential communications. Leaked confidential information creates a liability issue and may hurt business. Problem Nine: Negative Attitudes Negative attitudes interfere with the communication process in the workplace. In some cases, two employees may dislike one another or distrust each other, creating a wall between the two when they try to communicate. Other employees simply take an indifferent attitude toward work in general, causing them to not care about what is said during normal workplace communication. Problem Ten: Lack of Follow Through Once information is dispersed in the office environment, specific actions take place based on the communications. For example, after a meeting to discuss the direction of a project, the attendees likely need to complete tasks based on what you discussed in the meeting. If the communication doesn't leave employees with a clear sense of how to follow through with actions, you are likely to see a breakdown and unfinished work. Improving communication in today’s diverse workplace. (Tools for Managers to Overcome Communication Barriers) The key to bridging communication gaps begins with awareness and understanding. Once identifiable patterns emerge, specific tactics can be used to mitigate conflict and reinforce effective communication. Some of the following tools are familiar, but certainly merit repeating. a. Use Simplified Language. b. Use Repetition for a Theme. c. Avoid Using Gender-Specific Metaphors. Typically, men prefer analogies of sports or war to convey emotion into meaning that ultimately may be lost by some female colleagues. Therefore, try to use traditionally gender-neutral examples whenever possible. d. Employ the Most Effective Technologies Available. Consider whether using the phone will have more impact than an email. Message boards and web-based posting options allow more reserved team members equal opportunity to contribute to discussions. Also, web-based video conferencing or Pod Casts are a cheaper alternative to travel and can facilitate non-verbal communication, greatly
  13. 13. 13 contributing to impact and meaning. Select the right communication tool for the right task, and not necessarily the most efficient one best suited to your work habits. e. Seek Outside Training. Engage consulting experts who specialize in diversity training based on region, nationalities, or gender. Provide a documented policy for employees to review, discuss, and adhere to. f. Be specific about timelines and due dates for deliverables. Concepts of time vary between cultures. Outline a clear set of deliverables with milestone information so that all stakeholders are aware of your expectations. g. Establish ground rules for your team to collaborate. Clearly outline what is and is not acceptable. Is everyone expected to contribute? What tools will be used to do so and how are team members permitted to challenge each other? Restate the goals and continue driving the discussion to that goal. As time becomes increasingly scarce in a deadline-driven world, effective communication can mean the difference behind success or certain disaster. Below are four simple tips to keep in mind when interacting and communicating with others in your organization.  Keep an open mind  Have at least some knowledge of people‟s cultural backgrounds  Practice active listening  Watch your nonverbal communication  Maintain a personal touch In order to have effective employee communication in the workplace, we must become better listeners and always put ourselves in their position in order to have good internal communication in the workplace. With a basic understanding of what we do wrong while communicating, one will be able to improve communication skills and recognize communication problems that arise during employee communication in the workplace.

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