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Revised njask 3 5 part 1

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Revised njask 3 5 part 1

  1. 1. NJ ASK LAL GRADES 3-5<br />11<br />1<br />
  2. 2. 2<br />2<br />
  3. 3. 3<br />3<br />
  4. 4. 4<br />4<br />
  5. 5. Patricia Hutton<br />CMSCE<br />pjhutton@aol.com<br />tikap@aol.com<br />5<br />5<br />
  6. 6. Overview of the New Jersey Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (NJ ASK)<br />Assesses skills in 4 content clusters:<br />• Writing<br />• Reading<br />• Working with Text [Interpreting Text]<br />• Analyzing/Critiquing Text<br />ASSESSMENT CLUSTER TASK TIME<br />1. Writing: persuasive 25 minutes<br />2. Reading: narrative MC, OE1 questions 50 minutes<br />3. Listening/reading: poem<br />4. Writing: explain (poem-linked prompt) composition 25 minutes<br />5. Reading: everyday text MC, OE questions 25 minutes<br />6<br />6<br />
  7. 7. two text types: narrative and everyday<br />followed by multiple-choice and open-ended questions based on skills readers use to understand, analyze, and evaluate texts for content, meaning, and organization<br />Students will:<br />• recognize a theme or central idea.<br />• recognize details that develop or support the main idea.<br />• extrapolate information and/or follow directions.<br />• paraphrase, retell, or interpret words, phrases, or sentences from the text.<br />• recognize the organizational structure of the text.<br />• recognize a purpose for reading.<br />• use reading strategies (e.g., questioning, clarifying, predicting).<br />• make tentative predictions of meaning.<br />• make judgments, form opinions, and draw conclusions from the text.<br />• interpret textual conventions and literary elements.<br />7<br />7<br />
  8. 8. questions target skills in two clusters:<br />Working with Text and Analyzing/Critiquing Text( NJ ASK3 emphasizes Working with Text )<br />PASSAGE TYPE Grade 3 Questions /Grade 4 Questions TIME<br />Reading: narrative or story 6 MC, 1 OE 5 MC, 2 OE 50minutes<br />Reading: everyday text 6 MC, 1 OE 25 minutes<br />8<br />8<br />
  9. 9. Working with Text Questions<br />Recognizing a central idea or theme - stated or implied- clues in text <br />Examples :<br />Imagination helps us to solve problems.<br />Ordinary objects can be used to create unusual art.<br />Recognizing supporting details- contribute to the development of a character or plot, or that develop essential ideas<br />Extrapolating information - ideas and information implied by, but not explicit in text<br />Students use clues from the text to identify how a character feels.<br />9<br />
  10. 10. Paraphrasing, Vocabulary- the meaning of words and students’ strategies to determine ,always in context<br /> page numbers provided to encourage students to turn back to the text<br />Recognizing text organization- narratives-questions on setting, character, and plot<br />everyday texts-questions on subtopics, charts, and illustrations and text organization (sequence, comparison-contrast, or cause-effect)<br />Recognizing a purpose for reading- the reader’s purpose<br />10<br />10<br />
  11. 11. Analyzing/Critiquing Text (NJ ASK) <br /><ul><li>predict meanings
  12. 12. draw conclusions
  13. 13. form opinions about the text
  14. 14. author's techniques.
  15. 15. textual conventions and literary elements </li></ul>11<br />11<br />
  16. 16. Analyzing Text Questions<br />Questioning, Clarifying, Predicting- <br />use of reading strategies to construct meaning <br />provide a focus and a context for responding (e.g., asking a question of the author or a character)<br />analyze ideas and information from text to develop a response<br />almost always open-ended items<br />Predicting tentative meaning-<br />ambiguity<br />ideas are not fully explained or language has multiple interpretations<br />use language and contextto analyze the meaning of a statement.<br />Forming opinions-<br /> students respond to the text<br />a focus (e.g., whether the main character would make a good friend)<br />use ideas and information from text to develop response<br />always open-ended items<br />12<br />12<br />
  17. 17. Analyzing Text Questions<br />Making judgments, Drawing conclusions- based on knowledge fromideas and information in the text. For example, students might be asked to analyze how the setting (e.g., the season of the year) affects the sequence of events within a story, or to analyze the effect of skipping a step in a certain procedure.<br />Literary elements and textual conventions- focus on devices used by the author. Students might be asked what a specific metaphor conveys about a character in the story, or why an author uses italics for certain phrases.<br />13<br />13<br />
  18. 18. Making judgments, Drawing conclusions-<br />based ideas and information in text <br />analyze how the setting (e.g., the season of the year) affects the sequence of events within a story, or to analyze the effect of skipping a step in a certain procedure.<br />Literary elements and textual conventions-<br />devices used by the author<br />what a specific metaphor conveys about a character in the story<br />why an author uses italics for certain phrases.<br />14<br />14<br />
  19. 19. Narrative Text<br /> written totell a story <br />establishes or develops a conflict<br /> addresses themes of human existence <br />between 900 and1300 words for grade 3 <br />1400 and 2000 words for grade 4 <br />strong thematic focus<br />traditional narrative structure containing:<br />• age- and grade-level appropriate themes<br />• a clearly identifiable problem/conflict and resolution<br />• a well-organized plot with clearly developed events<br />• well-developed characters<br />• settings essential to the plot<br />• literary elements i.e. imagery and foreshadowing<br />• a range of vocabulary in adequate context<br />15<br />15<br />
  20. 20. Sample Questions Released by NJ<br />Literary <br />MC (3.1.G.13) (AT: Prediction of Tentative Meanings) <br /> “Joseph leaned against his new locker and crossed his arms over his chest, feeling very much like a fish out of water” means Joseph felt __________<br />A. nervous. <br />B. surprised. <br />C. respectful. <br />D. uncomfortable. * <br />16<br />16<br />
  21. 21. How would you model analyzing these questions for your students?<br />1. What is the theme of “Brave as a Mountain Lion”?<br />Hard work can lead to good ideas.<br />Nature teaches us about ourselves.<br />We can do hard things with help from others.<br />Everything we know we learn in school.<br />2. At the beginning of the story, why doesn’t Spider feel like eating dinner?<br />He is too worried to eat.<br />He does not like deer meat.<br />He is waiting for his father.<br />He has to study for a spelling bee.<br />17<br />17<br />
  22. 22. Which question is answered in paragraph 2?<br />A Where did Arthur grow up?<br />B Why did Arthur like tennis best?<br />C When was Arthur born?<br />D What did Arthur like to do at school?<br />In the article, the park offered all of these EXCEPT —<br />F tennis<br />G football<br />H baseball<br />J swimming<br /> Who is the hero in this story?<br /> A Patrick's mother <br /> B Uncle Jack <br /> C Patrick's father <br /> D Duffy <br />  <br /> Which word means about the same as hesitant in paragraph 7?<br /> A Excited<br /> B Careless <br /> C Brave <br /> D unsure<br />18<br />18<br />
  23. 23. In the story, what causes Milton to wake up?<br />A He hears a loud noise outside.<br />B He smells his breakfast cooking.<br />C He remembers he has to go to school.<br />D He feels cold because of the storm outside.<br />Read the sentence from paragraph 4 in the box below.<br />“There’s a wall of snow blocking the front door.” The description “wall of snow” shows________________<br />A how wet the snow is.<br />B how cold the snow is.<br />C how deep the snow is.<br />D how white the snow is. <br />19<br />19<br />
  24. 24. In paragraph 20, what does Ida mean when she says, “I left that classroom and went into the story”?<br />A. She went to the library and found another book to read.<br />B. She forgot she was nervous and started to enjoy the story.<br />C. She became tired of the story, so she made one up instead.<br />D. She felt the room was too loud, so she went someplace quiet. <br />What lesson does Ida learn in the chapter?<br />A. Always help adults when they are feeling ill.<br />B. Try new things, even when they are challenging.<br />C. Always practice reading to yourself before you read to others.<br />D. Keep trying to get things right, even when people laugh at you.<br />20<br />20<br />
  25. 25. What does the last sentence of the story mean?<br />A. The boy and the pups were rescued by a hunter and his grown hounds.<br />B. The boy and his pups made the lion think they were a grown man and experienced hunting dogs.<br />C. The boy fell asleep and dreamed that he and the pups were grown up and experienced hunters.<br />D. By morning, the lion was finally scared off by another mountain lion.<br /> With which of these opinions does the writer of the article most likely agree? <br />A. Female patriots should be recognized.<br />B. The events at Danbury were unimportant.<br />C. The British should have won the American Revolution.<br />D. George Washington is more important than most people think.<br />21<br />21<br />
  26. 26. Which best describes how Inez feels about her father’s work after their trip to the salt mine?<br /> She has a greater respect for his work.<br /> She hopes to have the same kind of experience again.<br /> She thinks he should not keep his job.<br /> She decides it is not as appealing as she imagined. <br /> Which sentence best supports the idea that Inez is excited about her father’s surprise?<br /> She didn’t know what to expect, but she knew she would love being with her father.<br /> When she had agreed to go with her father on his newspaper assignment, she had pictured an adventure, not hard labor.<br /> She could taste the salt in her mouth, smell it in the air, and feel it on her skin.<br /> Apparently her father’s experience in the salt mine was different from hers.<br />22<br />22<br />
  27. 27. Open Ended Questions<br />23<br />23<br />
  28. 28. NJ Samples<br />OE (3.1.G.4) (AT: Drawing Conclusions) <br />In this story, Kia does not agree with her mother’s decision to let the bird go free. <br />• Tell two reasons Kia’s mother gives for letting the bird go. <br />• Do you agree with Kia’s mother’s decision? Explain why or why not. <br />Use information from the story to support your response. <br />OE (3.1.G.9) (WT: Recognition of Supporting Details) <br />In the article the author compares watching a movie at home to watching a movie in a theater. <br />• Describe what it is like to watch a movie at home. <br />• Describe what it is like to watch a movie in a theater. <br />• Explain two things they have in common. <br />Use information from the story to support your response.<br />24<br />24<br />
  29. 29. When Spider thinks about the spelling bee, he thinks about a<br /> mountain lion, a coyote, and a spider.<br />• Explain how each one helps Spider.<br />• Decide which one is most helpful and explain why.<br />Use information from the story to support your response.<br /> Based on the story, explain how the storm makes it difficult for Milton to get milk for his family. Support your answer with important details from the story. <br />Use details from the story.<br />What other ways could Milton have try to solve the problem? Explain why you think these answers would work.<br />25<br />How would you teach students to approach these questions?<br />25<br />
  30. 30. Supporting Comprehension<br />After reading a story, students make a collage or draw a particular character based on the author’s description. They then share their artwork with the class and explain key features of their art on the basis of the text.<br />(E) Students prepare to read Ezra Jack Keats’ The Snowy Day by first sharing their experiences with snowy weather. Then they read the story and compare how the main character’s experiences are similar to or different from experiences they have had.<br />(E) After reading Eve Bunting’s book Wednesday’s Surprise to a second-grade class, the teacher discusses the value of literacy with the children. They share any knowledge they have on this topic and talk about feelings they would have in a situation like the one depicted in the book. The lesson might end with a discussion of the question, “Why is literacy important to most people?”<br />26<br />26<br />
  31. 31. (E) In a discussion following a read-aloud, students comment on the adequacy of a character’s response to a problem. They are asked to identify the part of the text that directly supports their comments.<br />(E) Students research the question, “What kind of pet is best for a city dweller to own?” They know they will be required to defend their point of view by citing examples from stories they have read as well as information they have heard on television shows and from nonfiction materials they have consulted, such as children’s encyclopedias and magazines. Each child has an opportunity to present his or her point of view and to cite evidence that supports it.<br />(E) As part of an illustrator study, the teacher invites the children to select their favorite illustrator of children’s books. Each child selects a favorite illustrator and defends the selection by sharing one illustration with the class and explaining how it conveys the related information or feelings in the book.<br />27<br />27<br />
  32. 32. (E) After reading Ezra Jack Keats’ Peter’s Chair, students identify Peter’s situation (a new baby in the family). The teacher writes the situation in the middle of chart paper and puts herringbone organization around it. The class dictates the causes and effects that occur throughout the story.<br />(E) Students adopt pupae and house them in a glass terrarium with appropriate plants. They chart the development of the pupae into caterpillars and butterflies in their learning logs. Then they read Carle’s The Very Hungry Caterpillar and create a Venn diagram to show the similarities and differences between the ideas found in their factual logs and Carle’s fictional account of the butterfly’s development.<br />( E ) Students read Hansel and Gretel and chart the plot as a sequence of problems and solutions <br />( E ) After completing a unit on folktales, the teacher asks students to draw a picture of one setting that was important in their favorite folktale and to include the character and action that occurred in that setting. Students share their pictures and explain why they selected the settings.<br />( E ) Students listen to a read-aloud of a story, such as Little Red Riding Hood. They then retell the story but omit mention of an important character, such as the hunter or woodsman. Afterwards, students talk about the effect this omission has on the events in the story.<br />(E) Students rewrite a tale, such as Snow White, using a contemporary setting.<br />28<br />28<br />
  33. 33. Resources<br />The Department of Education offers four sources of informtionabout the NJ ASK.<br />• Web site: http://www.state.nj.us/education<br />• Web site: http://www.ets.org/njask<br />• Web site: http://www.njpep.org/assessment<br />• Office of State Assessments<br />609-341-3456<br />Mailing address:<br />New Jersey Department of Education<br />P.O. Box 500<br />Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0500<br />http://www.neaq.org/scilearn/kids/babypeng.html <br />http://www.doe.mass.edu/mcas/2009/release/<br />http://www.doe.virginia.gov/VDOE/Assessment/Release2008/index.html<br />http://www.nj.gov/education/njpep/assessment/3_4/grade3_4.html<br />http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/resources/online/2009/taks_g04_read/4reading.htm<br />29<br />29<br />
  34. 34. Patricia Hutton<br />CMSCE<br />pjhutton@aol.com<br />tikap@aol.com<br />30<br />30<br />
  35. 35. 31<br />31<br />

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