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Sketching and rendering

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Sketching and rendering

  1. 1. Sketching and rendering
  2. 2. What is sketching?
  3. 3. What is sketching? It’s a medium
  4. 4. What is sketching? It’s a medium for thinking and exploring
  5. 5. What is sketching? It’s a medium for expressing and communicating
  6. 6. Why sketching?
  7. 7. Why sketching? • More effective than words at a glance •
  8. 8. Why sketching? Why is Drawing Important? It More effective than words at a glance • is a (potentially fast) means of communicating an idea • The “Sure Fire” A toy blaster that fires plastic ping-pong balls, stores several at once inside its shell, and automatically resets with each pull of the trigger. Ammo is loaded via the port on the top, several can be loaded at a time. Pulling the trigger once fires a ball out of the front and after the
  9. 9. Why sketching? Why is Drawing Important? It More effective than words at a glance • is a (potentially fast) means of communicating an idea • The “Sure Fire” can carry “Only a picture • A toy blaster that fires plastic ping-pong balls, stores several at once such ashell, and automatically resets with each pull of the trigger. inside its volume of data in such as small space.” Ammo is loaded via the port on the top, several can be loaded at a time. Pulling the trigger once fires a ball out of the front and after the • - Edward Tufte
  10. 10. Why sketching? • Better sketches are more likely to be perceived as creative ideas • • “The Influence of Sketch Quality on Perception of Product-Idea Creativity,” Kudrowitz, et. al
  11. 11. Why sketching? • Better sketches are more likely to be perceived as creative ideas • • “The Influence of Sketch Quality on Perception of Product-Idea Creativity,” Kudrowitz, et. al
  12. 12. Why sketching? • Better sketches are more likely to be perceived as creative ideas • • “The Influence of Sketch Quality on Perception of Product-Idea Creativity,” Kudrowitz, et. al
  13. 13. Why sketching? • Better sketches are more likely to be perceived as creative ideas • • “The Influence of Sketch Quality on Perception of Product-Idea Creativity,” Kudrowitz, et. al
  14. 14. Why sketching? • Better sketches are more likely to be perceived as creative ideas • • “..student drawing should be explicitly recognized alongside writing, reading, and talking as a key element in science education." • -Science magazine • “The Influence of Sketch Quality on Perception of Product-Idea Creativity,” Kudrowitz, et. al
  15. 15. Is this creative?
  16. 16. Is this creative? • Probably.
  17. 17. Is this creative? • Probably. • As a way of thinking and exploring, you should draw however you want to - imperfections can often lead to inspiration.
  18. 18. Is this creative? • Probably. • As a way of thinking and exploring, you should draw however you want to - imperfections can often lead to inspiration. • As a way of communicating, a good sketch can help get the point across.
  19. 19. The building blocks of sketching A visual language
  20. 20. The building blocks of sketching
  21. 21. The building blocks of sketching • A visual language • Mental models • Skills • Rules
  22. 22. The building blocks of sketching • A visual language • Mental models • Skills • Rules • Practice, practice, practice
  23. 23. Tools: what can I use?
  24. 24. Tools: what can I use? • Anything! •
  25. 25. Tools: some “favorites”
  26. 26. Tools: some “favorites” • Pens Commit to your lines!
  27. 27. Tools: some “favorites” • Pens Commit to your lines! • fine tip pen • felt tip pen
  28. 28. Tools: some “favorites” • Pens Commit to your lines! • fine tip pen • felt tip pen • Pencils • soft pencil • white pencil
  29. 29. Tools: some “favorites” • Alcohol-based ink markers Not just your ordinary marker!
  30. 30. Tools: some “favorites” • Alcohol-based ink markers Not just your ordinary marker!
  31. 31. Tools: some “favorites” • Paper It matters! • Tracing paper • Marker paper
  32. 32. Tools: some “favorites” • Paper It matters! • Tracing paper • Marker paper
  33. 33. A visual language Mental models Skills Rules
  34. 34. Mental models
  35. 35. Mental models • Draw a bike.
  36. 36. Mental models • Draw a bike. • Draw a lobster.
  37. 37. Mental models • Visual memory games • Architecture • Proportion • Necessary details
  38. 38. Mental models • Visual memory games • Architecture • Proportion • Necessary details
  39. 39. Mental models • Visual memory games • Architecture • Proportion • Necessary details
  40. 40. Mental models • Visual memory games • Architecture • Proportion • Necessary details
  41. 41. Mental models • Visual memory games • Architecture • Proportion • Necessary details
  42. 42. Mental models • Visual memory games • Architecture • Proportion • Necessary details
  43. 43. Mental models • Visual memory games • Architecture • Proportion • Necessary details
  44. 44. Mental models • Visual memory games • Architecture • Proportion • Necessary details
  45. 45. Mental models • Visual memory games • Architecture • Proportion • Necessary details
  46. 46. Mental models • Visual memory games • Architecture • Proportion • Necessary details
  47. 47. A visual language Mental models Skills Rules
  48. 48. Skills • Draw big. •
  49. 49. Skills • Draw with confidence. Uncertainty is Visible
  50. 50. Skills • Draw with confidence. Uncertainty is Visible Uncertainty is visible!
  51. 51. Skills: Freehand shapes
  52. 52. Skills: Freehand shapes • Lines
  53. 53. Skills: Freehand shapes • Lines • Curves
  54. 54. Skills: Freehand shapes • Lines • Curves • Circles
  55. 55. Skills: Freehand shapes • Lines • Curves • Circles • Ellipses
  56. 56. Skills: Freehand shapes • Lines • Curves • Circles • Ellipses Warm up with these shapes
  57. 57. A visual language Mental models Skills Rules
  58. 58. Exercise! • Orient transparency horizontally (landscape) • Draw a line dividing transparency into left/right halves • Orient foam model with vertical edge facing you, and the cylinder pointing to the right • Sketch the model on the left side of the transparency •
  59. 59. Rules: Before the Renaissance “Excuse me for shouting – I thought you Santa Trinita Maestá, by Cimabue were farther away.” Adapted from Gahan Wilson
  60. 60. Rules: The Renaissance • “Perspective is nothing else than seeing a place behind a plane of glass, quite transparent, on the surface of which the object behind the glass are to be drawn” • - Leonardo Da Vinci
  61. 61. Rules: Perspective • Florentine architect Filippo Brunelleschi • 1413 AD
  62. 62. Exercise! • Tape transparency horizontally onto the viewer • Place the model so that it appears in the right side of the transparency • Orient the model as for sketch #1 • Trace the outline of the model on the right side of the transparency • • tips: close one eye, look straight ahead at the model, and don’t move your head once you start drawing
  63. 63. Rules: Draw what you see, not what you know
  64. 64. Rules: Draw what you see, not what you know est. 9000 BC

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