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Education portal newsletter #36 May 2017

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Future Transport Competition: a teacher talks about the approach with his students + tips for getting entries completed. Design thinking: an interview with university students who design and build electric cars. Safety around trucks is the theme of new curriculum resources.

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Education portal newsletter #36 May 2017

  1. 1. Some students working on competition entries are looking at past and present transport in their suburb before imagining the years ahead. Decades ago there was a tram line out to the Auckland suburb of Pt Chevalier. Nowadays, the local school and residents are being consulted on proposed cycleways. Past and present transport ideas are stirring the imaginations of year 5-6 students at Pt Chevalier School. They are creating entries for the Future Transport Competition as part of a gifted and talented programme run by teachers Sarah Boddy and Nathan Crocker. Nathan says cycling is growing in the city. The cycleway proposals were a good springboard for students to start thinking about their own ideas. ‘So we’re taking them into that thinking, looking at the past, leading into the now, and what will happen in the future,’ says Nathan. ‘Sarah and I expect to be kept on our toes, and to be learners too. Our role will be to question the students’ choices and thinking, so they produce entries they’re really proud of.’ He says the competition will help students put thinking skills into action. ‘I could see that it was suitable for a human-centred design thinking approach. The students will really have to look at what our transport needs will be in the future. With the way technology is growing exponentially, I don’t think that we can predict all our future transport needs, but it will be interesting to see what they come up with.’ ‘I’m a big believer in learning through the struggle. Let them get immersed in the work and intervene when necessary. Our job as teachers is to fill their tool box with knowledge and skills so they can influence the world if they choose to.’ He says this group of students are animated when immersed in their learning. ‘There’s a real buzz and robust discussion – they challenge each other. And as a teacher, you might pose a curly question and give them that thinking time, see how they react to it.’ education.nzta.govt.nz ISSUE 36 | MAY 2017 The Future Transport Competition challenges student teams in years 1–13 to enter games or narratives about transforming transport. Entries must be by teams of three or more students. The deadline is Friday 30 June. education.nzta.govt.nz/ competition COMPETITION #FUTURETRANSPORT17
  2. 2. THE FUTURE IS NOW FOR STUDENT DESIGNERS Young people can be innovative when it comes to design thinking. For inspiration, look at the university students who design and build electric cars. Willy Dunlop and Jeremy Evans turn to show the race car up on its stand in a University of Canterbury Motorsport (UCM) workshop. Each wheel assembly includes a compact electric motor and a planetary gearbox. This is not your usual car. In fact, the machine – designed, built and tested by students in 2016 – was the first electric vehicle to win a dynamic event at the Formula SAE Australasia competition, which challenges university teams to design and build prototype race cars. ‘Our aim was to put all of our resources into building a complete high performance machine that could win the competition.’ The team designs a new electric car every year. Any enrolled UoC student can join. Final year engineering students lead design work, earning course credits. Commerce students work on the business plan. And it all happens to a strict schedule, says Willy. ‘By January we lock in the concept. Then we have design reviews. In April is the design freeze. Then we start manufacture. That timeframe is all about creating direction for the team.’ Willy says a huge focus is on reliability, with the car ready for testing from mid-July. This takes lots of work says lead electrical engineer Jeremy Evans. ‘It’s a fairly aggressive timeline, but it gives us time to iron out all the bugs and make sure we get the best performance out of it,’ says Jeremy. He’s a master’s student, aged 22, who has poured hours into design and testing of the electrics. Tasks in 2016 included tuning the electric motors and spot welding hundreds of battery cells. Jeremy says he has learned a lot. ‘I’ve gained a phenomenal amount from this project. I’m designing and implementing systems on the car and then getting feedback from the drivers. It’s an amazing test bench for design.’ Follow the team: www.facebook.com/UCMFSAE Design principles The UCM team works to these principles: Professionalism – in team structure, the design process and safe workshop practices. Validation – ‘We have to justify our design decisions through calculations and real life testing,’ says Willy. Integration – All the subsystems are optimised to work together – for example, the team ensures all parts will fit elegantly in the carbon fibre one- piece chassis (monocoque) with weight and ease of maintenance in mind. Why go electric? Electric cars have performance advantages, plus they prepare students for future careers. ‘If you look at where the motoring industry is heading, it is towards electric vehicles. So, it helps us a lot to get this experience,’ says Jeremy.
  3. 3. Advice and support for getting the Future Transport Competition entries in. To help, the competition’s student guide includes suggested project stages, inspired by design thinking. education.nzta.govt.nz/competition/student-guide Students needing a dose of inspiration can watch the Future Competition videos or take another look at the ideas bank. education.nzta.govt.nz/competition/videos education.nzta.govt.nz/competition/ideas-bank Quick help Check there’s only positive travel safety messages. Games or narratives should model safe, responsible use of roads and other transport systems. Help students to think in terms of how citizens can share the transport network with one another. Check all files and links in your entry can be viewed by the judges. Online documents must have privacy settings which allow anyone with the link to open them. Digital games or presentations must be able to be played or viewed directly. Avoid project files that require specialist software to open. Check entries against the judging criteria. • INVESTIGATION: The quality of your research. Evidence about how you looked into the future of transport. • PRESENTATION: How well your game or narrative was developed. • IDEAS: Evidence of deep thinking and innovative ideas. • SHARING: Evidence of how you shared your ideas in your school community. • OVERALL IMPRESSION: The ‘wow factor’ of your entry. JUNE 30 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES Meet two of our judges Competition winners will be picked by a panel of judges. Two are profiled here: Daniel Faitaua Daniel is a familiar face on TV as the newsreader for TVNZ Breakfast and 1News Midday. Before that he developed extensive experience as a broadcast reporter for One News and Close Up, an evening current affairs programme. ‘Don’t let the lights and camera fool you, the job of a TV reporter is far from glamorous. Journalists must use dogged determination and persistence to investigate and research stories to keep people informed, facilitate change and hold those in power accountable.’ Dr Bron Stuckey Bron is a Global Consultant Specialist in game play, game inspired learning, communities of practice and learning communities. Bron cut her teeth in games for learning through her 10 years with the highly successful Arizona State University Quest Atlantis program. She coined the term ‘lived curriculum’ through her work on digital citizenship in online games and virtual worlds. She also explores, curates and supports teachers using Minecraft in their classrooms. She works both in school with kids and teachers and online. The full judging panel is online: education.nzta.govt.nz/competition/judges
  4. 4. www.twitter.com/nztaeducationpinterest.com/nzta#futuretransport17facebook.com/TransportAgency/events April 2017. New curriculum resources use safety around trucks as a context for concepts in science, mathematics, social studies and health and PE. Science is one of four learning areas covered by a new set of curriculum resources – Keeping Safe Around Trucks. The resources can be freely downloaded from the NZ Transport Agency Education Portal and modified by teachers to meet student needs. Other learning areas are Mathematics with Statistics, Social Studies and Health and PE. Activities are arranged to help students: • identify prior knowledge • bring in ideas • connect ideas • extend ideas. The resources are mapped against level 1-4 achievement objectives of the New Zealand Curriculum. They are suitable for students in primary school, middle years and early secondary school. NZ Transport Agency Freight Strategy Manager Marinus La Rooij says ‘trucks provide a critical service to the New Zealand economy, moving goods to market.’ ‘But while trucks have an important function, those of us not in trucks need to be more aware of some of the safety risks of being around trucks on the road and how to keep ourselves safe,’ he says. ‘Around two thirds of crashes involving trucks and another vehicle are caused by a mistake by someone not in the truck. So there is a big opportunity to give people a better idea of what the safety risks are and how to keep themselves safe around trucks.’ education.nzta.govt.nz/resources/ primary/trucks SAFETY AROUND TRUCKS IS FOCUS FOR CURRICULUM RESOURCES P a g e | 7 www.education.nzta.govt.nz TRUCK SAFETY FACT 3. FACT: Large trucks take more time to accelerate and more time to slow down than smaller vehicles. EXPLANATION: FUTURE THINKING: TRUCK SAFETY FACT 4. FACT: Large trucks have bigger blind spots than smaller vehicles. A blind spot is an area around the vehicle that the driver cannot see. Truck blind spots are found: • immediately in front of the truck – the driver cannot see pedestrians crossing in front of the truck • beside the truck driver’s door • on the passenger side – this is bigger than the driver’s side blind spot, stretching the length of the truck and extending out the width of three lanes • directly behind the truck – the cab has no rear vision mirror because the trailer behind a truck is so high, a rear vision mirror would only show the truck driver their own trailer. EXPLANATION: FUTURE THINKING: P a g e | 7 www.education.nzta.govt.nz TRUCK SAFETY FACT 3. FACT: Large trucks take more time to accelerate and more time to slow down than smaller vehicles. EXPLANATION: FUTURE THINKING: TRUCK SAFETY FACT 4. FACT: Large trucks have bigger blind spots than smaller vehicles. A blind spot is an area around the vehicle that the driver cannot see. Truck blind spots are found: • immediately in front of the truck – the driver cannot see pedestrians crossing in front of the truck • beside the truck driver’s door • on the passenger side – this is bigger than the driver’s side blind spot, stretching the length of the truck and extending out the width of three lanes• directly behind the truck – the cab has no rear vision mirror because the trailer behind a truck is so high, a rear vision mirror would only show the truck driver their own trailer. EXPLANATION: FUTURE THINKING: P a g e | 9 www.education.nzta.govt.nz TRUCK SAFETY FACT 7. FACT: Large trucks throw out more water during wet weather thansmaller vehicles. EXPLANATION: FUTURE THINKING: TRUCK SAFETY FACT 8. FACT: Large trucks create more air turbulence than smallervehicles, which can affect oncoming vehicles. EXPLANATION: FUTURE THINKING: P a g e | 9 www.education.nzta.govt.nz TRUCK SAFETY FACT 7. FACT: Large trucks throw out more water during wet weather than smaller vehicles. EXPLANATION: FUTURE THINKING: TRUCK SAFETY FACT 8. FACT: Large trucks create more air turbulence than smaller vehicles, which can affect oncoming vehicles. EXPLANATION: FUTURE THINKING: Prompt for future thinking The resource includes Fact – Explanation – Future Thinking cards. These contains 15 cards on truck safety and 3 cards on energy use. Exemplars are included for teacher reference. These can be the basis for student explanations, wonderings and presentations.

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