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The role of educational developers in supporting open educational practices

While open educational resources (OER) increase in availability, sophistication, quality and adoption around the world there remains a gap in the utilization and contribution to open educational practices, amongst faculty. While an official definition for open educational practices is still emerging, we align ourselves with the following articulation which suggests nascent practices enabled by the affordances of OER and open technology infrastructure allowing for the transformation of learning (Camilleri & Ehlers, 2011) which invites students contribution, engagement, and ownership of knowledge resources thereby flattening the balance of power in student/teacher relationships (McGill, Falconer, Dempster, Littlejohn, & Beetham, 2013).

Arguments have been made at various levels to engage and support faculty in using open educational practices – at the institutional level to support strategic advantage through lower cost access to OER textbooks and educational materials (Mulder, 2011; Carey, Davis, Ferreras, & Porter, 2015); through incentives which support faculty engagement with instructional designers in the co-creation of reusable high-impact courseware (Conole & Weller, 2008; DeVries & Harrison, 2016); through the experimentation and adoption of the practice of teaching-in-the-open (Veletsianos, 2013); and in the forming of learning communities across institutions (Petrides, Jimes, Middleton‐Detzner, Walling, & Weiss, 2011).

This session will focus on the stakeholder role of the educational developer, often situated within teaching and learning centres, whose responsibility may include support of more open practices in higher education, to meet various institutional goals and objectives. Teaching and learning centres are well positioned to support change, review program and course objectives and quality, support professional development in the context of “open”, and support teaching and learning at the departmental, program, and course level. Open educational practices can be situated as a tool to support these change initiatives and provide new conceptualizations of teaching and learning (Bossu, & Fountain, 2015).

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The role of educational developers in supporting open educational practices

  1. 1. The role of educational developers in supporting open educational practices Michael Paskevicius Vivian Forssman http://bit.ly/EdDevOpen
  2. 2. Our intended session outcomes At the end of the workshop participants will: • Develop perspective on the unique position and potential value of educational developers in supporting open practices • Develop a set of strategies for supporting and promoting open educational practices around learning outcomes, teaching strategies, and assessment • Consider the educational developers role of change agent in advancing openness
  3. 3. Your experience advocating for open education On your own: Take 2 minutes and jot down a few notes about your experience explaining, advocating for, or engaging others with the concept or practice of open education 1. Identify the most significant barrier you have heard in response to the idea 2. Identify the most significant benefit you have heard in response to the idea 3. Identify a single strategy you might use to promote openness?
  4. 4. (Van Note Chism, 2011)
  5. 5. What do educational developers do? • Create and facilitate faculty development opportunities (e.g., instructional, curricular, and technological) • design and produce educational resources (e.g., print and media-based) • collaborate and consult on special projects and policy development initiatives • advocate for, lead, and facilitate institutional change • broker relationships and opportunities for partnership • contribute directly or indirectly to the scholarship of teaching and learning and educational development (McDonald et al., 2016)
  6. 6. How can educational developers infuse and inspire open educational practices while supporting and consulting with educators and students?
  7. 7. Teaching & Learning Activities Learning Outcomes Assessment & Evaluation Adapted from Biggs & Tang, 2011 Teaching & Learning Resources
  8. 8. Teaching & Learning Activities Teaching & Learning Resources Learning Outcomes Assessment & Evaluation Accessible, clear, transparent, expansive, and student-centred learning outcomes Accessible, adaptable, shared, and collaborative resources Student as producer, peer- reviewer, collaborator, and digitally literate contributor to OEP Exposed, collaborative, and collectively improved teaching and learning activities
  9. 9. A working definition for OEP in the context of educational development Teaching and learning practices where openness is enacted within all aspects of instructional practice; including the design of learning outcomes, teaching resources, activities, and assessment. OEP engage both faculty and students with the use and creation of OER, draw attention to the potential afforded by open licences, facilitate open peer-review, and support student-directed projects.
  10. 10. Come up with an open practice for each of the instructional elements (learning outcomes, teaching and learning activities, and assessment and evaluation) • Describe the practice • What tools do you need? • Who are the stakeholders? http://bit.ly/EdDevOpen
  11. 11. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 Follow me: http://twitter.com/mpaskevi Portfolio: http://michaelpaskevicius.com/
  12. 12. Benefits of increased open teaching practice • lower cost access to OER textbooks and educational materials (Mulder, 2011; Carey, Davis, Ferreras, & Porter, 2015); • support faculty engagement with instructional designers in the co-creation of reusable high-impact courseware (Conole & Weller, 2008; DeVries & Harrison, 2016); • experimentation and adoption of the practice of teaching-in-the-open (Veletsianos, 2013); • forming of learning communities across institutions (Petrides, Jimes, Middleton‐Detzner, Walling, & Weiss, 2011)
  13. 13. Business as usual Shares resources among colleagues Engages in interinstitutional resource sharing Licensing and permissions often unclear Engages students in contributing or remixing open access, openly licensed and public domain resources Creates and shares T&L resources that are open access, openly license and/or public domain Shares practice at teaching conferences and events Uses open access, open licenses and public domain resources in T&L Adopts and prescribes an open textbook Engages students in using open access, open licenses and public domain resources Understanding of licensing usage rights Understanding and adoption of open licensing Uses open resources found online Often under fair use Spectrum of open educational practices Most common practices Emerging practices Bleeding edge practices
  14. 14. Weller’s Open Practice Paradoxes Democratises space - Increases marginalisation Success of Open - Anti-open culture Power of Open - Anti-knowledge climate Formalised - Experimental Friendly/Supportive - Dangerous/unpleasant Powerful dissemination - Reduction of discourse (Weller, 2016)
  15. 15. Pathways to Adopting OEP http://bit.ly/OEPPathways
  16. 16. Open Educational Practices: A Conundrum for Educational Developers A reimagining and refocusing of high-impact teaching and learning practices peppered with open Often considered an ‘extra step’ towards the design of teaching and learning Sensitivity to student privacy and comfort with operating in the open Raise disciplinary particularities each with their own resources, strategies, norms, and values Parallels (murkiness) in relation to networked learning, student engagement strategies, SOTL, experiential learning, existing closed learning technologies
  17. 17. We are all educational developers
  18. 18. Open Pedagogy: Biology 325 • All students built and maintained their own open access Wordpress site tasked with creating two research articles on a local bird species of their choice • Posts were aggregated into a parent site • Comments emerged as students reviewed one another's work • This work is now archived and accessible on the web http://wordpress.viu.ca/biol325
  19. 19. The Compass Rose open access online journal for undergraduate research in liberal arts Edited and curated by students Agreed to Creative Commons licensing for the journal in principle http://wordpress.viu.ca/compassrose/ Open Pedagogy: The Compass Rose
  20. 20. The ChemWiki is a collaborative approach toward chemistry education where an Open Access textbook environment is constantly being written and re-written by students and faculty members resulting in a free Chemistry textbook to supplant conventional paper-based books. http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/
  21. 21. OEP and Networked Learning
  22. 22. Prepared by: Michael Paskevicius Learning Technologies Application Developer Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning michael.paskevicus@viu.ca Follow me: http://twitter.com/mpaskevi Portfolio: http://michaelpaskevicius.com/ Presentations: http://www.slideshare.net/mpaskevi This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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