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Kamapuaʻa

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Kamapuaʻa

  1. 1. Ka Moʻolelo no Kamapuaʻa: HWST 104
  2. 2. KINOLAU • According to the Hawaiian Dictionary, kinolau are “many forms taken by a supernatural body, as Pele, who could at will become a flame of fire, a young girl, or an old hag” • It is believed that when the gods tangibly manifested themselves on earth, they took forms of kinolau, or numerous bodies. • Such manifestations include human, fish, and plant forms, as well as inanimate objects and phenomenon such as lightning, hailstones or rainbows. • In these visibly earthly manifestations, the gods became a part of day to day life for the Hawaiian people.
  3. 3. KINOLAU OF KAMAPUAʻA (As mentioned in this kaʻao) • Kukui – Candlenut tree – It is one of the plant forms of Kamapuaʻa that comes to help him – The nuts are eaten by the pig – It is said that the leaves suggest the outline of the snout and ears of a pig
  4. 4. KINOLAU OF KAMAPUAʻA (As mentioned in this kaʻao) • ʻUhaloa – A small weed with ovate leaves and small, clustered yellow flowers. Leaves and inner bark of root are very bitter and are used for tea or chewed to relieve sore throat. – One of the plant forms of the pig demi-god Kamapuaʻa
  5. 5. KINOLAU OF KAMAPUAʻA (As mentioned in this kaʻao) • Olomea – A native shrub or small tree with ovate, red-veined leaves, and many tiny greenish flowers and red fruits borne in panicles. – The wood is hard and formerly was used with soft hau wood to produce fire by rubbing. – It is one of the plant forms of Kamapuaʻa
  6. 6. KINOLAU OF KAMAPUAʻA (As mentioned in this kaʻao) • Hala – The pandanus, native from southern Asia east to Hawaiʻi, growing at low altitudes, both cultivated and wild. – Manu uses: leaves (lauhala) for mats, basket, hats, etc.; fruit for lei, brushes; male flowers to scent kapa.
  7. 7. KINOLAU OF KAMAPUAʻA (As mentioned in this kaʻao) • ʻAmaʻumaʻu – Young amaʻu ferns; many ʻamaʻu ferns – ʻAmaʻu is a type of fern with fronds that are narrower, smaller, and less divided than those of the hāpuʻu. – ʻAmaʻu ferns are eaten by the pig – One of the forms that Kamapuaʻa could take at will
  8. 8. NONI • The Indian mulberry; a small tree or shrub native to Asia, Australia, and islands of the Pacific. • Many small flowers are borne on round heads, which become pale yellow unpleasant tasting fruits • Used for dye and medicinal purposes; eaten in times of famine
  9. 9. WIND & RAIN • Many wind and rain names are associated with places, and typically represent a characteristic of the wind/rain of that particular area • Many names are widespread, but some are in special areas – ʻĀ paʻa (p. 244): Short for ʻĀ paʻapaʻa, the name of a strong wind associated with Kohala, Hawaiʻi
  10. 10. WIND & RAIN • Many wind and rain names are associated with places, and typically represent a characteristic of the wind/rain of that particular area • Many names are widespread, but some are in special areas – ʻĀ paʻa (p. 244): Short for ʻĀ paʻapaʻa, the name of a strong wind associated with Kohala, Hawaiʻi

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