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Teaching Super Readers Requires Super Powers: Teaching Gifted Readers in the K-1 Classroom

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Presentation for Bloomington Public Schools

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Teaching Super Readers Requires Super Powers: Teaching Gifted Readers in the K-1 Classroom

  1. 1. Teaching Super Readers Requires Super Powers! Teaching Gifted Readers in the K-1 Reading Classroom Presentation for K-1 Teachers in Bloomington Public Schools Dr. Liz Fogarty lizfogarty.weebly.com foga0017@umn.edu 1
  2. 2. What questions do you hope will be answered today? 2
  3. 3. 3 Who are SUPER READERS? Challenges of Instruction Use of Data Powerful Texts Classroom Environment Differentiated Teaching Strategies
  4. 4. Who are SUPER READERS? 4
  5. 5. Who Are Talented Readers? Are they being challenged?
  6. 6. Interview with a Young Gifted Reader 7 Read at a level two grades or more above their current grade Enjoy reading (usually) Read to satisfy curiosity and read to learnRead early and often without being taught
  7. 7. Read early and at advanced levels Use advanced processing in reading Read with enthusiasm and enjoyment Demonstrate advanced language skills (oral, reading, written) Talented Readers: 2+ grades ahead
  8. 8. Interview with a Young Gifted Reader 9 1 in 5 non-gifted read early
  9. 9. 50% of early readers go on to be talented readers
  10. 10. Interview with a Young Gifted Reader 12 Mothers with high educational levels
  11. 11. Interview with a Young Gifted Reader 13 Range in socioeconomic status
  12. 12. Advanced Processing Retain a large quantity of information for retrieval Automatically integrate prior knowledge and experience in reading Utilize higher order thinking skills such as analysis and synthesis Process information and thoughts at an accelerated pace Synthesize ideas in a comprehensive way Perceive unusual relationships and integrate ideas Grasp complex ideas and nuances Advanced Language Skills Enjoy and subtleties and complexities of language Demonstrate advanced understanding of language Use expansive vocabulary Use reading to acquire a large repertoire of language skills Use language for humor Display verbal ability in self-expression Use colorful and descriptive phrasing Demonstrate ease in use of language From the work of Sullivan and Reis What Makes Them SUPER READERS?
  13. 13. What Are The Challenges of Teaching SUPER READERS? 15
  14. 14. Rate your self, school, or district on your ability to get your Talented readers to… Eagerly engage in reading-related activities Apply previously learned literary concepts to new reading experiences Focus on reading for an extended period of time Pursue advanced reading material (at their level or above) Demonstrate tenacity when posed with challenging reading Show interest in reading other types of interest-based reading materials
  15. 15. 18 READING TO LEARN Reading Level = 3.0+ LEARNING TO READ Reading Level = 1.5-2.9 PRE-READER Reading Level = preK Providing a Continuum of Delivery
  16. 16. 19 Photo credit to Mondo Educational Publishing
  17. 17. 20 Photo credit to Mondo Educational Publishing Reading Level = 4.0 Reading Level = 2.0 Reading Level = 1.6 Reading Level = 6.2 Reading Level = 1.4 Reading Level = 1.8 Regular Classroom Setting RANGE = 4.8 Grade Levels
  18. 18. 21 Photo credit to Mondo Educational Publishing Reading Level = 4.8 Reading Level = 5.0 Reading Level = 3.6 Reading Level = 6.2 Reading Level = 4.4 Reading Level = 4.0 Cluster Grouped Classroom
  19. 19. 22 Credit to Mrs. Van Dyke https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2017/04/03/four-strategies-that-promote-a-growth-mindset-in-struggling- readers/ B A B C F
  20. 20. What are the Issues for Young Talented Readers? •Lack of Challenge 23 Lack of Growth Boredom
  21. 21. Few self-regulation strategies Get used to giving minimal effort Few advanced reading strategies
  22. 22. Talented readers receive little challenging instruction, instead doing work that is simple and redundant for them. (Archambault et al., 1993; Reis et al., 2004; Reis, Westberg, Kulikowich, & Purcell, 1998; Westberg, Archambault, Dobyns, & Salvin, 1993; Westberg et al., 1998)
  23. 23. Teachers knew what to do…… they just could not find the time, the help, or the materials to do it well.
  24. 24. What does CHALLENGE look like?
  25. 25. (Matusevich & O’Connor, 2008) Environment has qualitatively different academic environments (more in-depth, complex and abstract concepts & ideas).
  26. 26. Investigations engages consistently in sophisticated investigations of materials, texts, interactive technologies and learning activities. (Matusevich & O’Connor, 2008)
  27. 27. Application develops and applies deep understanding of significant concepts, generalizations and essential questions to problem finding and problem solving. (Matusevich & O’Connor, 2008)
  28. 28. No Limits sets no pre-determined limits. (Matusevich & O’Connor, 2008)
  29. 29. 33
  30. 30. 34
  31. 31. Use of Data 35
  32. 32. 36Credit: Lori Comallie-Caplan
  33. 33. 37
  34. 34. 38
  35. 35. 39
  36. 36. 40 Ratatouille
  37. 37. Powerful Texts 41
  38. 38. 42
  39. 39. Challenging Text 43 Text Complexity Text Level Motivation
  40. 40. 44 Level It
  41. 41. 45 Book Buddy
  42. 42. Make picks seem elite from @englishelixir! !
  43. 43. From Cult of Pedagog
  44. 44. 48 READING TO LEARN Reading Level = 3.0+ LEARNING TO READ Reading Level = 1.5-2.9 Providing a Continuum of Delivery PRE-READER Reading Level = preK
  45. 45. CROWDSOURCING: Our Favorite Books for Young Talented Readers 49
  46. 46. 50
  47. 47. Medal 2014 Winner: Parrots over Puerto Rico, written by Susan L. Roth and Cindy Trumbore, illustrated by Susan L. Roth A Splash of Red: The Life and Art of Horace Pippin, written by Jen Bryant, illustrated by Melissa Sweet Look Up! Bird- Watching in Your Own Backyard by Annette LeBlanc Cate Locomotive by Brian Floca The Mad Potter: George E. Ohr, Eccentric Genius by Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan
  48. 48. Classroom Environment 53
  49. 49. 54
  50. 50. 55Fountas & Pinnell, 2018
  51. 51. 56Fountas & Pinnell, 2018
  52. 52. Schoolwide Components • Cross grade grouping for reading • Grade acceleration for reading • Increase library access 57
  53. 53. Time Spent Reading in School Study by John Goodlad in A Place Called School Elementary 6% Middle 3% High 2%
  54. 54. TreatmentControl Experimental Condition 40 30 20 10 MeanNumberofMinutesReadperClass 95% Confidence Intervals of Minutes Read M = 35.68 minutes M = 10.80 minutes 35.68 minutes 10.80 minutes
  55. 55. 61
  56. 56. 62 PRE-READERS Providing a Continuum of Delivery • Tactile experiences • Developmentally appropriate • Materials at their level • NOT just paper and pencil activities • Guided reading if there are others at the same level
  57. 57. 63
  58. 58. 64 LEARNING TO READ Providing a Continuum of Delivery • Tactile experiences • Books and materials at their level • Guided reading if there are others at their level
  59. 59. 65
  60. 60. 66 Waseca Reading Program
  61. 61. 67 READING TO LEARN Providing a Continuum of Delivery • Independent experiences • Small group reading experiences (GR) if there are students with similar needs • Book choice at adequately challenging levels
  62. 62. Teaching Story Elements 69 Use the Cube Creator http://www.rea dwritethink.org/ files/resources/i nteractives/cub e_creator/
  63. 63. 70
  64. 64. Differentiated Teaching Strategies 71
  65. 65. 72 PRE-READER Reading Level = preK From The Next Step in Guided Reading by Jan Richardson
  66. 66. 73 READING TO LEARN Reading Level = 3.0+ From The Next Step in Guided Reading by Jan Richardson
  67. 67. Curriculum Compacting More complex reading and writing Independent study and project opportunities Interest assessment and interest- based reading opportunities Acceleration Independent reading choices Thematic instructional changes for talented readers Within class grouping Substitution of regular reading material with more advanced trade books Independent writing options Advanced questioning skills and literary skills Across class grouping
  68. 68. Time to Read
  69. 69. SEM-R Results Significant differences favoring the SEM-R treatment group Reading Fluency Reading Comprehension
  70. 70. SEM-R
  71. 71. 78
  72. 72. Which reading strategy instruction is provided to talented readers?
  73. 73. Reading Strategies Making Connections Making Connections Making Connections Determining Importance Determining Importance Determining Importance Questioning Questioning Questioning Visualizing Visualizing/ Sensory Images Visualizing & Inferring Making Inferences Making Inferences Summarizing Synthesizing Synthesizing Metacognition Paris, 2004 Keene & Zimmerman, 1997 Harvey & Goudvis, 2000
  74. 74. Reading Comprehension Strategies Lower Level Higher Level Decoding/Phonics Synthesizing Slowing down/Rereading Making Inferences Using pictures Making Connections Knowledge Determining Importance Other Visualizing Questioning Metacognition Keene & Zimmerman, 1997; Harvey & Goudvis, 2000
  75. 75. Prevalence of Lower and Higher Level Strategy Instruction Observed in Conferences Reading Strategy High Avg. Low χ2 (2) Lower Level Strategies 7 6 15 5.24 Higher Level Strategies 7 12 25 11.77* * p < .01, Cohen’s d = .86 Table 4.10 Chi-Square Goodness of Fit
  76. 76. SEM-R
  77. 77. Three Goals of SEM-R To increase enjoyment in reading To encourage students to pursue challenging independent reading To improve reading fluency, comprehension, and increase reading achievement
  78. 78. 86
  79. 79. 87
  80. 80. 89
  81. 81. Describe an AHA or something you’re thinking about from this morning
  82. 82. Thank you! For more information, contact: lizfogarty.weebly.com foga0017@umn.edu

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