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Technology and English 
Learners: A New Language, 
or Universal? 
STEMtech 
Nov. 10, 2014 
Kristin Lems and 
W. Jason Steg...
All Kids can Learn! 
All kids can learn, all kids can learn - I’ll tell you now and you’d best 
believe: All kids can lear...
Abstract: 
Like math, technology is often called “universal,” but its 
uses by multilingual learners can differ significan...
Our grant (2011-2016) 
National Louis University, Chicago
Grant funding 
$1,764,075 
5 year training grant 
From Office of English 
Language Acquisition, 
U.S. Dept. of Education 
...
Design of the Grant 
parapros 
ELL Student 
Admini-strators 
STEM 
teachers 
Parents 
and 
families 
University 
ESL 
teac...
Design of the Grant 
parapros 
ELL 
Student 
Admini 
- 
strators 
STEM 
teachers 
Parents 
and 
families 
University 
ESL ...
Design of the Grant 
parapros 
ELL 
Student 
Admini-strators 
STEM 
teachers 
Parents 
and 
families 
University 
ESL 
tea...
Design of the Grant 
parapros 
ELL 
Student 
Admini-strators 
STEM 
teachers 
Parents 
and 
families 
University 
ESL 
tea...
The way we see our role at 
STEMtech: 
to help bridge 
language teaching and 
content learning of ELLs 
at the community 
...
The New 
Mainstream
“The New Mainstream” 
Children and youth who speak a 
language other than English at home in 
the US is 18% in large metr...
Theories of language 
acquisition related to CALL 
CALL (computer assisted language learning) 
interaction hypothesis 
c...
“the hypothetical theory of 
CALL sounds not much 
different from an integrated 
theory of language 
acquisition; in fact,...
Interaction 
Hypothesis 
capitalize on technology’s 
ability to promote interaction 
and community
Focal Question 
How can you use technology in your 
classroom to promote interactions for 
language development in English...
Benefits of technology for ELLs 
“levels the playing field” 
 ELLs are very tech savvy (even those from 
developing coun...
From a high school teacher: 
ELL students…have all seemed 
very well versed with digital 
devices and media. Many of 
them...
Partner work 
Interaction is a second 
language reading 
process 
Co-constructing text
Tricky and easy words from 
technology 
1. gigabyte to message macbook cached blog 
2. doc phishing online ITunes keyboard...
Let’s try something… 
Pick one line of the tech words 
and with a partner create an 
interactive word-learning 
activity
Tech tools of high value 
for ELLs 
 Avatars – Communicating their ideas and 
through avatars (they love this – it is ver...
Depth of Processing 
Theory 
multiple modalities, 
intentional and 
incidental 
vocabulary learning
Focal Question 
How can you use video, audio, 
graphics and text to promote both 
intentional and incidental 
vocabulary l...
Infographics
Images 
Using images 
to build 
background 
knowledge 
and practice 
language
Intentional and incidental 
vocabulary learning 
Intentional 
Vocabulary learning through 
intentional focus on the meani...
Using Facebook 
 Lee (2012) conducted a quasi-experiment 
with 33 Korean college students enrolled in an 
ESL course 
 S...
Lee (2012) Example 1
Lee (2012) continued 
ELL response example: 
“Often, we use the word ‘renovation’ as 
the term for construction. But I w...
Let’s try something… 
What do you know about non-renewable 
resources, in 
Spanish? 
 Which of the following Spanish word...
(1) La mayor parte de la energía usada 
hoy viene de los organismos que 
vivieron hace cientos de millones de 
años. (2) L...
Post-test! 
 Which of the following Spanish words do you know? 
combustible fósil 
carbón recurso 
renovable
(1) Most of the energy used today 
comes from organisms that lived 
hundreds of millions of years ago. (2) 
Fossil fuels a...
Spanish version 
La mayor parte de la energía usada hoy viene de los organismos que vivieron 
hace cientos de millones de ...
Implications for practice 
 Provide key vocabulary before it comes up in class and 
practice it together 
 Ask students ...
Sociocultural Theory 
building on the strengths 
of students’ language 
practices outside of 
school
Focal Question 
How can student successes outside of 
school, including their technology 
activities, be used to support s...
Lam (2000) studied an immigrant high school 
student from Hong Kong who arrived in US in 
middle school. He felt positione...
Let’s try something! 
Scenario # 1 
Instructor: Please put your cellphones 
away and deactivate them during class. I 
don’...
Scenario #2 
Instructor: Today we’ll talk about satellite 
technology. We’ll type in keywords on our 
smart phones and see...
More uses for Mobile phones 
Stockwell (2010) used Internet searches, 
SMS about what was learned, SMS focus 
on vocabula...
Online translators 
Positive: 
Can quickly resolve unknown words using 
first language resources 
Can help access meani...
The TESOL Technology 
Standards 
 Standards for TEACHERS 
 Standards for STUDENTS 
 Includes ADULT level 
 Find and do...
Teacher methods: 
I have used my IPAD to engage my 
students and to have the liberty of walking 
around the classroom as I...
TESOL Tech Goal 1 Standard 1: 
Adult students improve their literacy in English 
while learning basic computer operations....
Low resource, low-access classroom 
with one computer and overhead 
projector - TPR 
1. Students watch the teacher perform...
Mid-resource, mid-access setting 
in computer lab with no internet 
Students build their writing skills when learning 
bas...
High resource, high access setting 
with internet access, in classroom lab 
with video camera 
Students are also able to u...
Help ELLs find tech resources in 
the community 
Community resources 
Obtaining smart phones through community 
assistan...
Review of Focal Questions 
How can you use technology in your classroom to 
promote interactions for language development ...
Thank you! Kristin and Jason 
klems@nl.edu, Jason.stegemoller@nl.edu 
National Louis University, Chicago
Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal?
Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal?
Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal?
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Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 1 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 2 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 3 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 4 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 5 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 6 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 7 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 8 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 9 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 10 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 11 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 12 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 13 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 14 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 15 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 16 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 17 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 18 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 19 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 20 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 21 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 22 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 23 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 24 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 25 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 26 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 27 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 28 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 29 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 30 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 31 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 32 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 33 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 34 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 35 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 36 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 37 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 38 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 39 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 40 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 41 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 42 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 43 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 44 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 45 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 46 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 47 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 48 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 49 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 50 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 51 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 52 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 53 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 54 Technology and English Learners:  A New Language, or Universal? Slide 55
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presentation by Kristin Lems and Jason Stegemoller, professors at National Louis University, at the 2014 STEMTech conference in Denver, Colorado organized by theleague.org.

Technology and English Learners: A New Language, or Universal?

  1. 1. Technology and English Learners: A New Language, or Universal? STEMtech Nov. 10, 2014 Kristin Lems and W. Jason Stegemoller National Louis University Chicago, IL
  2. 2. All Kids can Learn! All kids can learn, all kids can learn - I’ll tell you now and you’d best believe: All kids can learn! Every kid has their own style, Every kid has their own speed Watch them closely for awhile to find out what they need. School can be such a happy place, Got to put on a happy face Now’s the moment so do not wait, Tell those kids – I think you’re great! Technology can help so much if you don’t forget the human touch! Blend it together, add lights and sound You’ll have the brightest class around! When you have a productive day who learns the most? It’s hard to say? Kids learn from peers and books and you - If you work together, you’ll learn lots too!
  3. 3. Abstract: Like math, technology is often called “universal,” but its uses by multilingual learners can differ significantly. Tech teachers need to notice the language and culture of technology, including text structures, resources, and usage patterns, so that English learners can take full advantage of post-secondary educational opportunities.
  4. 4. Our grant (2011-2016) National Louis University, Chicago
  5. 5. Grant funding $1,764,075 5 year training grant From Office of English Language Acquisition, U.S. Dept. of Education 2011-2016
  6. 6. Design of the Grant parapros ELL Student Admini-strators STEM teachers Parents and families University ESL teachers Elementary teacher ed faculty
  7. 7. Design of the Grant parapros ELL Student Admini - strators STEM teachers Parents and families University ESL teachers Elementary teacher ed faculty Find potential paraprofessionals from STEM and less common language backgrounds
  8. 8. Design of the Grant parapros ELL Student Admini-strators STEM teachers Parents and families University ESL teachers Elementary teacher ed faculty Find potential paraprofessionals from STEM and less common language backgrounds Provide focus on language of STEM and how to teach it to ELLs
  9. 9. Design of the Grant parapros ELL Student Admini-strators STEM teachers Parents and families University ESL teachers Elementary teacher ed faculty Find potential paraprofessionals from STEM and less common language backgrounds Provide funding for 18 s.h. of ESL endorsement coursework with a STEM focus Provide focus on language of STEM and how to teach it to ELLs
  10. 10. The way we see our role at STEMtech: to help bridge language teaching and content learning of ELLs at the community college level
  11. 11. The New Mainstream
  12. 12. “The New Mainstream” Children and youth who speak a language other than English at home in the US is 18% in large metropolitan areas (Aud, et al, 2012)  Students who attended K-12 ESL or bilingual program  “Generation 1.5” -- arrived in the US as teenagers (Harklau, Losey, & Siegal, 1999).  International Students – Arrived in US after graduating from high school abroad
  13. 13. Theories of language acquisition related to CALL CALL (computer assisted language learning) interaction hypothesis capitalize on technology’s ability to promote interaction and community depth of processing theory multiple modalities, incidental and intentional vocabulary learning sociocultural theory build on the strengths of students’ language outside of school  (Chappelle, 2003, TESOL Technology Standards document)
  14. 14. “the hypothetical theory of CALL sounds not much different from an integrated theory of language acquisition; in fact, it is the same” (TESOL technology Standards p. 1).
  15. 15. Interaction Hypothesis capitalize on technology’s ability to promote interaction and community
  16. 16. Focal Question How can you use technology in your classroom to promote interactions for language development in English language learners?
  17. 17. Benefits of technology for ELLs “levels the playing field”  ELLs are very tech savvy (even those from developing countries)  great resource for self-learning  great way to stay in touch with other ELLs
  18. 18. From a high school teacher: ELL students…have all seemed very well versed with digital devices and media. Many of them, especially with the social norms rampant within a high school environment, access social media and message applications quite often.
  19. 19. Partner work Interaction is a second language reading process Co-constructing text
  20. 20. Tricky and easy words from technology 1. gigabyte to message macbook cached blog 2. doc phishing online ITunes keyboarding GIF 3. to boot spam PDF pinterest upload shutdown 4. web surfing menu geek ebook friend/unfriend 5. firewall texting techie pixel DVD/DVR 6. keyword avatar cyberspace logon ROM 7. mouse spybot spam helpdesk fax nerd 8. skype stream cloud snail mail metafile 9. dropdown reboot app podcast google
  21. 21. Let’s try something… Pick one line of the tech words and with a partner create an interactive word-learning activity
  22. 22. Tech tools of high value for ELLs  Avatars – Communicating their ideas and through avatars (they love this – it is very user friendly and non-threatening)  Chat – gives plenty of low-stress, authentic writing practice  Showing images and videos – gives another way to share information when vocabulary is still developing
  23. 23. Depth of Processing Theory multiple modalities, intentional and incidental vocabulary learning
  24. 24. Focal Question How can you use video, audio, graphics and text to promote both intentional and incidental vocabulary learning for ELLs?
  25. 25. Infographics
  26. 26. Images Using images to build background knowledge and practice language
  27. 27. Intentional and incidental vocabulary learning Intentional Vocabulary learning through intentional focus on the meaning, use, sound, spelling of words Incidental Vocabulary learning without conscious intention to learn the words
  28. 28. Using Facebook  Lee (2012) conducted a quasi-experiment with 33 Korean college students enrolled in an ESL course  Students were asked to learn 100 academic vocabulary works  Students Googled assigned words and then posted a text, audio or movie clip demonstrating the use of the word in context  Students explained their words and responded to each other
  29. 29. Lee (2012) Example 1
  30. 30. Lee (2012) continued ELL response example: “Often, we use the word ‘renovation’ as the term for construction. But I want to use this to human. We must renovate ourselves everyday” Results: Pre-test: mean 17.1 known words out of 100 Post-test, recognition: 74 known words out of 100
  31. 31. Let’s try something… What do you know about non-renewable resources, in Spanish?  Which of the following Spanish words do you know? combustible fósil carbón recurso renovable
  32. 32. (1) La mayor parte de la energía usada hoy viene de los organismos que vivieron hace cientos de millones de años. (2) Los combustibles fósiles son sustancias ricas en energía, formadas de los restos de organismos que una vez vivieron. (3) Los tres combustibles fósiles son el petróleo, el gas natural, y el carbón. (4) Los combustibles fósiles llevan centenares de millones de años para formarse, por eso se consideran recursos no renovables.
  33. 33. Post-test!  Which of the following Spanish words do you know? combustible fósil carbón recurso renovable
  34. 34. (1) Most of the energy used today comes from organisms that lived hundreds of millions of years ago. (2) Fossil fuels are substances rich in energy formed from the remains of organisms that lived at one time. (3) The three fossil fuels are petroleum, natural gas, and coal. (4) Fossil fuels take hundreds of millions of years to form, therefore they are considered non-renewable resources.
  35. 35. Spanish version La mayor parte de la energía usada hoy viene de los organismos que vivieron hace cientos de millones de años. Los combustibles fósiles son sustancias ricas en energía, formadas de los restos de organismos que una vez vivieron. Los tres combustibles fósiles son el petróleo, el gas natural, y el carbón. Los combustibles fósiles llevan centenares de millones de años para formarse, por eso se consideran recursos no renovables. English version Most of the energy used today comes from organisms that lived hundreds of millions of years ago. Fossil fuels are substances rich in energy formed from the remains of organisms that lived at one time. The three fossil fuels are petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Fossil fuels take hundreds of millions of years to form, therefore they are considered non-renewable resources.
  36. 36. Implications for practice  Provide key vocabulary before it comes up in class and practice it together  Ask students if they know concepts and terms in another language to help them activate their knowledge encoded in another language and bridge to English  Develop extensive reading activities to get the gist of topics to promote incidental vocabulary learning and reading confidence.  Create opportunities for intensive reading coupled with interaction to promote intentional vocabulary learning
  37. 37. Sociocultural Theory building on the strengths of students’ language practices outside of school
  38. 38. Focal Question How can student successes outside of school, including their technology activities, be used to support success in your classroom?
  39. 39. Lam (2000) studied an immigrant high school student from Hong Kong who arrived in US in middle school. He felt positioned as an outsider in school because of his “non-native like English” He created a website out of school related to his personal interests in Japanese pop culture. He represented himself as knowledgeable and he was positioned as an expert.
  40. 40. Let’s try something! Scenario # 1 Instructor: Please put your cellphones away and deactivate them during class. I don’t want you texting during class or not focusing on our lesson. Student 1: I’m not gonna do that. Student 2: Sorry, I need my phone! Instructor: I’m not going to continue until you put those away. Do you hear me?
  41. 41. Scenario #2 Instructor: Today we’ll talk about satellite technology. We’ll type in keywords on our smart phones and see what we can learn. What are some keywords from this reading? Student 1: Satellite? Communication? Teacher: good words. We downloaded the dictionary apps last week. Can you check them for some synonyms for those words? Student 1: message, statement…. Student 2: Oh! I found some pictures of satellites. Instructor: Great, can you send us a link so we can see it on the screen?
  42. 42. More uses for Mobile phones Stockwell (2010) used Internet searches, SMS about what was learned, SMS focus on vocabulary/grammar Thornton and Houser (2005) “sent short mini-lessons for learning vocabulary via e-mail to learners’ mobile phones 3x a day, using new words in multiple contexts to allow learners to infer the meanings”
  43. 43. Online translators Positive: Can quickly resolve unknown words using first language resources Can help access meanings Negative: Removes sense of urgency to learn word Sometimes conveys misconception depending on quality of the translator tool
  44. 44. The TESOL Technology Standards  Standards for TEACHERS  Standards for STUDENTS  Includes ADULT level  Find and download at Tesol.org
  45. 45. Teacher methods: I have used my IPAD to engage my students and to have the liberty of walking around the classroom as I teach.
  46. 46. TESOL Tech Goal 1 Standard 1: Adult students improve their literacy in English while learning basic computer operations. In an Adult Education English language literacy context, students can improve their English skills when learning basic computer operations. Prior to any instruction in this area it is important to assess students’ fundamental abilities. This can be performed as a self assessment, functional quiz, or evaluative observational activity. Target: 20 mixed background beginning1 English language students. (3 different options depending on tech resources)
  47. 47. Low resource, low-access classroom with one computer and overhead projector - TPR 1. Students watch the teacher perform basic operating functions while the teacher speaks the commands out loud. 2. Each student has a handout of the commands for a visual reference. Next, student volunteers read the items on the list and watch the teacher perform the functions. 3. Students come up in pairs and perform the functions as the teacher calls them out. Students discuss with one another before responding. 4. Students volunteer in pairs, alternating between the role of the one who gives the command and the one who performs the task in front of the class. Total physical response example: Turn the computer on
  48. 48. Mid-resource, mid-access setting in computer lab with no internet Students build their writing skills when learning basic computer functions. 1. Students follow the teacher’s modeling of the skills discussed above. 2. After the teacher demonstration, they work in pairs giving and carrying out commands for 10 more minutes. 3. The teacher provides a second demonstration related to basic functions of presentation software. 4. Each pair of students then creates and saves a three-slide presentation. On each of the three slides they write a basic computing function command and illustrate
  49. 49. High resource, high access setting with internet access, in classroom lab with video camera Students are also able to utilize online resources that reinforce oral and presentational skills. 1. After achieving familiarity with the basic operating functions and associated language commands described in previous plans, students explore either the word processing or presentation software in pairs for 10 minutes. 2. They then watch examples of video clips of people describing how to perform basic computer operations 3. In groups, students choose up to 6 new commands to peer teach through a video clip they create. 4. The teacher posts the video clips, which then serve
  50. 50. Help ELLs find tech resources in the community Community resources Obtaining smart phones through community assistance Helping ELLs and their families who lack home computers access internet through smartphones how to schedule conferences How to pay bills How to search and apply for jobs…
  51. 51. Review of Focal Questions How can you use technology in your classroom to promote interactions for language development in English language learners? How can student successes outside of school, including their technology activities, be used to support success in your classroom? How can you use video, audio, graphics and text to promote both intentional and incidental vocabulary learning for ELLs?
  52. 52. Thank you! Kristin and Jason klems@nl.edu, Jason.stegemoller@nl.edu National Louis University, Chicago
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presentation by Kristin Lems and Jason Stegemoller, professors at National Louis University, at the 2014 STEMTech conference in Denver, Colorado organized by theleague.org.

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