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Safety awareness training program

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Safety awareness training program

  1. 1. 1 SAFETYSAFETY AWARENESSAWARENESS TRAININGTRAINING PROGRAMPROGRAM
  2. 2. 2 Shipboard Familiarization Safe Working Practice Onboard General Safety
  3. 3.  To increase the level of awareness and understanding of participants on general safety issues and measures to prevent injuries and potential accidents onboard the vessel 3
  4. 4.  To be aware of the importance of vessel safety familiarization  To understand certain policies on health and safety and to identify various hazards affecting it.  To identify common injuries and accidents onboard ship  To enhance awareness on prevention of injuries and accidents  To identify the vessel risks factors 4
  5. 5. 5 All seafarers shall receive familiarization training or instruction in accordance with section A-VI/1 of the STCW Code.
  6. 6. 6 Certain items like the: 1. Nearest call button (Manual Call Point) 2. Nearest fire extinguisher 3. Emergency station 4. Muster point Must be familiarized with as soon as possible
  7. 7. 7 Ship’s Familiarization ...it is the responsibility of each crewmember to become familiar with the geography of the ship, and in particular, the location and types of the various life-saving appliances and fire fighting equipment and the safest emergency escape routes and exits. Although every effort is made by the responsible Officers to ensure that crewmembers are given maximum opportunity to familiarize the ship...
  8. 8.  What is my task and do I understand what to do?  Where do I have to appear?  Who gives the orders and to whom shall I report?  What are the different alarm signals? 8
  9. 9. 9 Crew Emergency Plan and the Crew Muster List • Location of posters? • Purpose? • How the two plans are connected to each other? • Assigning of crew numbers and duties. • Changing of crew numbers.
  10. 10. 10 CREW RANK/NAME EMERGENCY STATION DUTIES LB No. 01 C/OFFICER MOBILE ON-SCENE COMMANDER 2 02 2/OFFICER BRIDGE DEPUTY COMMANDER 1 03 AB LIFEBOAT NO.1 LIFEBOAT NO.1 LEADER 1 04 MOTORMAN FIRE STATION NO.1 FIRE TEAM NO.1 LEAD 2 Your Crew Number, not your Rank or Title, determines your Emergency Station and your Assigned Lifeboat or Liferaft
  11. 11. 11
  12. 12. Safety Plan Fire Control Plan Damage Control Plan Operating Instructions 12 Drawn to ease the access to information needed in an emergency. - shows the locations and the types of the various life-saving appliances onboard. - outlines the recommended escape routes and the emergency exits. - shows the locations, types and the technical arrangements of the various fire-fighting equipment available onboard. - shows the locations and the control stations of the various watertight doors. - the boundaries and the openings of the watertight compartments. - arrangements for the correction of any list due to flooding. - posters and signs showing how to operate the various equipment and arrangements such as lifeboats, liferafts, portable fire extinguishers, fire alarms, watertight doors, emergency radio equipment, pyrotechnics, etc.
  13. 13. 13 The Shipboard Plans SAFETY AND FIRE CONTROL PLANS A F T FORWARD CREWCREW INTERNETINTERNET AREAAREA STORESTORE LW P PP P CREW GALLEYCREW GALLEY SCULLERYSCULLERY CREW MESSCREW MESS WASHWASH MARINA DECKMARINA DECK
  14. 14.  FIRE DOORS - seal the zones. Prevent smoke and/or fire from spreading into another sections or compartments. 14 • WATERTIGHT DOORS - divide and seal the spaces in lower decks into watertight compartments, thereby preventing water from flowing from one compartment into another. • Closing force is equal to 15 tonnes.
  15. 15. 15 FIRE DOORS FIRE DOOR
  16. 16. 16
  17. 17. WTD Remote panel on the bridge for automatic closing. 17
  18. 18. 18 Watertight Doors Watertight doors can kill or maim.. If it is moving, DON’T PASS through it.
  19. 19.  The condition of being safe from undergoing or causing hurt, injury or loss. (Britannica 2002)  It is freedom from danger or risk of injury. ( Collins Concise Dictionary) 19 • To prevent loss of life. • To prevent the occurrence of accidents and incidents involving injury to people or damage to ship, cargo, equipment and the environment. Health and Safety What is the meaning of HEALTH ? • The freedom from physical disease or pain. (Mirriam – Webster)
  20. 20.  Shipping companies should commit to the protection from accidental loss to its personnel, ships, cargo and other property and the environment.  In fulfilling this commitment, they have to provide and maintain a safe and healthy working environment, in compliance with regulatory requirements and as indicated by industry standards. 20
  21. 21. Certain company policies and International guidelines are implemented on board to ensure health and safety at sea.  Safety and Improvement Reporting System  Garbage Management System  Safe working practices  Drug and Alcohol policies  Personal Hygiene 21 Health and Safety
  22. 22. Definitions INCIDENT ACCIDENT NEAR-ACCIDENT / NEAR MISS NON-CONFORMITY 22 An event or chain of events which has caused or could have caused injury, illness and/or damage ( loss ) to human, property and the environment or third parties. An event or chain of events which has caused injury, illness and/or damage ( loss ) to human, property and the environment or third parties. An event or chain of events which under slightly different circumstances could have resulted in an accident. An observed situation where objective evidence indicates a non-fulfilment of a specified requirement. ( Refer to ISM Code )
  23. 23.  Bottles, jars, light bulbs.  Tin cans, etc.  Used batteries.  Plastics. 23 Ship-generated garbage shall be segregated properly according to types to facilitate proper disposal in compliance with MARPOL Regulations. Incinerator Pulper / grinder Glass/bottle crusher Tin compactor Shore-side facility Plastic compactor • Cigarettes, cigars, pipes and other smoking implements. • Waste paper, cardboard boxes, smaller burnable items, etc. Garbage Handling Room • Food wastes, vegetable, fruit, etc.
  24. 24. PLASTICS, including but not limited to, synthetic ropes and fishing nets and plastic bags. 24
  25. 25. 25 D O N ’ T T H R O W GARBAGE OVERBOARD - IT’S AGAINST THE THE LAW ! STOW IT - DON’T THROW Ignore this notice and you risk fines and imprisonment
  26. 26. Use of PPE  safety shoes  hand gloves  safety goggles  boiler suits  safety harness 26 HOT WORK WORKING ALOFT WORKING WITH CHEMICALS
  27. 27. 27
  28. 28. COMPANY “It is a policy of most companies to criminally prosecute anyone in possession of illegal drugs or paraphernalia on board vessel” 28
  29. 29. 29
  30. 30. 30 0.04 % BAC and above Dismissal with possible legal action.
  31. 31. 31 3. When the effect of the intoxicants on a person’s manner, disposition, speech, general appearance or behaviour is apparent, the master shall arrange for an alcohol test with a breath analyser if provided on board. A person shall be considered impaired, when having an alcohol content of 0.04% or greater. The master will keep the records of all alcohol tests carried out.
  32. 32. 32 5. In order to control the abuse of alcohol, the master will • control the sales of alcoholic beverages to crew members; • seal all alcoholic beverage stores before arriving at any port; • prohibit serving alcoholic beverages to third parties boarding the vessel to perform any type of work in any capacity (i.e. pilots, authorities, surveyors, visitors, etc.) • prohibit individuals to carry onboard any uncontrolled alcohol; • stop the sale of alcoholic beverages onboard, if and when he considers necessary; •effect immediate dismissal to any crewmember that violates any of the requirements of this policy
  33. 33. Part 5 – Guidance on prevention of drug & alcohol abuse -Drug & alcohol abuse directly affect the fitness and ability of a seafarer to perform watchkeeping duties. Seafarers found to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol should not be permitted to perform watchkeeping duties until they are no longer impaired in their ability to perform those duties. >Maximum of 0.08% blood alcohol level (BAC) during watchkeeping duty is the minimum safety standard >prohibiting the consumption of alcohol within 4 hours prior to serving a member of a watch 33
  34. 34. 34
  35. 35. 35 Development of an Accident •Hazard/s •A composition or component of danger. •Examples: •Oily rag •Problematic crew •Unearthed ullaging device •Danger •is a situation brought about the presence or combination of hazards. •without hazard there is no danger. •Examples: •Oily rag left on deck. •Problematic crew walking on deck with reduced concentration. •Unearthed ullaging device lowered in cargo tank with highly volatile / flammable cargo.
  36. 36. ◦ Accident  is an unwanted occurrence that is triggered by the presence of danger..  without danger there is no accident.  Examples:  The oily rag left on deck caught fire due to spontaneous combustion.  Problematic crew walking on deck with reduced concentration, fell in a tank through deck opening.  Unearthed ullaging device lowered in cargo tank with highly volatile / flammable cargo. Discharge of static electricity occurred causing an explosion. 36 Development of an Accident
  37. 37. 37 Hazard Sources
  38. 38. Types of Hazards Physical  Heat  Noise  Vibration  Pressure changes  Radiation  Electric shock  Electrostatic 38 Chemical •Toxic / Poisonous substances •Reactive chemicals •Oxygen depleting chemicals Biological Microbial sources Ergonomic •Safety engineering •Repetitive stress Mind and Attitude •Neurosis •Psychosis •Personality Disorder FIRE COMMUNICATION GAP MECHANICAL & STRUCTURAL DAMAGES MALFUNCTION / BREAKDOWN FIRE LOSS OF LIFE FIRE OR EXPLOSION INJURY OR DEATH ILLNESS OR DEATH INJURY, DAMAGE TO PROPERTY & POLLUTION TO ENVIRONMENT AFFECT JOB PERFORMANCE THAT WOULD LEAD TO ACCIDENT What accidents can the following hazards lead to?
  39. 39. 39
  40. 40. Accident Is an undesired event involving fatality, injury, ship loss or damage, other property loss or damage, or environmental damage (e.g., fires, collisions, etc.). Injuries Damage or harm done to or suffered by a person or any living thing 40
  41. 41. Three most frequently injured part of the body  ARM, HAND, FINGER  FOREIGN BODY IN THE EYE  LEG, FOOT, TOE 41
  42. 42. Exposure to harmful substances 42
  43. 43. Burns from cooking 43
  44. 44.  Foreign body in the eye 44
  45. 45.  Hands and legs jammed in uncoiled wires and ropes 45
  46. 46.  At sea 16th March 2008  On 10 March 2008 Catering Boy was cleaning floors in the accommodation. For this purpose he mixed a cleaning agent containing Natrium hypochlorite solution with hydrochloric acid, causing chemical fumes to form.  During the night from 10th to 11th March, the eyes of catering boy started to itch and turned out to be red in the morning.  Later on the 11th March he reported to the 2nd Officer, who gave him Terramycin N eye ointment for treatment. 46
  47. 47.  On 12th March catering boy reported the incident to the master who ordered to flush his eyes with water, to apply wet eye pads and continue the treatment with Terramycin N.  Upon arrival in Dublin, being the next port, on 17th March 2008 he will see a doctor.  On investigation by the Master what happened, he discovered the erroneous mixing of the cleaning agents.  The text on the plastic bottles holding the cleaning agents and the hydrochloric acid turned out to be in Dutch only. (as both products were of Dutch makers) 47
  48. 48. 48  On the holder of the cleaning agent a clear warning was [placed (in Dutch) never to mix it with any other cleaning liquid. Needless to say that mixing it with hydrochloric acid was extremely dangerous.  On questioning the catering boy he turned out not to be aware of that and he also was not aware of what hydrochloric acid really is and of the dangers of it.  The catering boy did not wear rubber of plastic chemical resistant gloves and eye protection when he handled the hydrochloric acid Incident with cleaning agents
  49. 49.  Safety Data Sheet  Banchem  Ing. Pavel Banák – Banchem  Safety Data Sheet  AKTIVIT HP  Date of issue: 7th of October 2003  Date of revision:  Identification of the Substance/Preparation and Company Name: ◦ Chemical Name of the Substance/ Business Name of the Preparation: AKTIVIT HP  CAS No.:  EC No.: ◦ Use of the Substance/Preparation: CLEANING AGENT WITH DESINFECTING EFFECT ◦ Identification of the Producer/Importer:  Producer – importer: producer  Name or Business Name: Ing. Pavol Banák – BANCHEM  Place of Business or Seat: Dunajská Streda 929 01, Rybný trh 332/9  Company Registration No.: 11700360  Tel. No.: 00421-(0)31-552 51 10  Fax: 00421-(0)31-552 46 01  1.7. Telephone Information in cases of Emergency: Toxicological Information Centre: 00421 2 547 741 66 49
  50. 50. 50 Composition/Information on Additives: Chemical Characteristic of the Product: The Product contains the following dangerous substances: Identificat ion No. Chemical Name of the Substance Concent ration (%) Symbols of Danger CAS: EC (EINECS): Index No.: 7681-52-9 231-668-3 017-011-00- 1 Natrium Hypochlorite <4,0000 C R-phrases:R 31, R34 S-phrases: CAS: EC (EINECS): Index No.: 70592-80-2 274-687-2 Amines, C10- 16- alcyldimethyl, N-oxides <2,5000 Xi, R-phrases: R38, R41, S-phrases: S26, S28, S37/39 CAS: EC (EINECS): Index No.: Mixture - Mixture of tenzides containing aminooxid. <2,0000 Xi, R-phrases:R38, R41 S-phrases: S26, S28, S 37/39. CAS: EC (EINECS): Index No.: 1310-73-2 215-185-5 011-002-00- 6 Caustic soda <1,0000 C R-phrases: R 35 S-phrases:S37/39, S45,S1/2, S 26
  51. 51. 51 Identification of Possible Hazards Classification of the Substance/Preparation: Xi. R 38, R 41 Negative physically-chemical effects: irritating The most serious unfavorable effects to Human Health at use of the Preparation: Irritating for eyes and skin. Danger of serious damage to eyes. The most serious unfavorable effects to the Environment at use of the Preparation: Oxidative effects. By contact with acids toxic chlorine gases are released. Material Data Sheet
  52. 52. 52 First Aid Measures: General Instructions: To proceed according to the following points. In a case of Inhalation: Move the affected person to fresh air. Seek medical advice in a case of continuous difficulties. In a case of Skin contact: Take off the contaminated clothing and wash with plenty of water and soap. In a case of continuous difficulties seek a medical advice. In a case of Eye contact: It is necessary to take out the eye lenses. Eyes should be rinsed by clean water during approximately 10 minutes in way, so that water could get under the both eye-lids and Seek medical advice immediately. In a case of ingestion: Seek medical advice immediately. Further data: General measures of the First Aid are to be applied Material Data Sheet
  53. 53. 53 Fire Fighting Measures: Suitable Extinguishing Media: Sprayed water Unsuitable Extinguishing Media: not applicable. Special Risks of Exposition: Toxic gases can originate during fire Special Protective Equipment for firemen and fire fighting units: Protective clothing and breathing apparatus against the inorganic gases. Further data: not applicable. Material Data Sheet
  54. 54. 54 Stability and Reactivity: Conditions, under which the substance/preparation is stable: The preparation will be stable, if subscribed conditions are kept. Danger of polymerization: Necessity to prevent polymerization: Conditions to be avoided: temperature lower than + 5°C, higher than 30°C Substances and materials, with which the Product can not be in any contact: Aluminum, Acids. Stability: Necessity to prevent instability: Dangerous products of decomposition: irritating toxic vapors of chlorine can originate during fire. Dangerous reactions: reactions with acids Further data: not applicable. Explosibility: Sodium hypochlorite is a strong oxidizing reagent, during decomposition with acids reacts explosively, heat and toxic chloride gases originate from this reaction. Inflammability: not inflammable. Oxidative properties: Sodium hypochlorite has strong oxidation abilities Heat instability of organic peroxides: Storing temperature: Caustic effect: not caustic Material Data Sheet
  55. 55. 55 Full wording of all and any phrases marked by letter R: R 31: Contact with acids liberates toxic gases. R 34: Causes burns/ alkali burns R 35: Causes strong burns/ alkali burns R 38: Irritates skin R 41: Risk of serious injury of eyes Material Data Sheet
  56. 56.  Toxic and other hazardous substances and products should be used and stored in such a way that users and others are safeguarded against accidents, injuries or particular discomfort.  A record (product data sheet) should, when obtainable, be kept on board, available to all users, containing sufficient information to determine the degree of the danger posed by the substances.  If possible, the substance should be stored in the original packaging or in another correspondingly labeled packaging that cannot give rise to confusion. Such substances must be stored in a locked, well- ventilated room. 56
  57. 57. 57 Chemicals should always be handled with extreme care, protection should be worn and the manufacturer's instructions closely followed. Particular attention should be paid to protecting eyes. Some cleaning agents, such as caustic soda and bleach, are chemicals and may burn the skin. A chemical from an unlabelled container should never be used. Exposure to certain substances such as mineral oils, natural solvents and chemicals, including domestic cleaning agents and detergents, may cause dermatitis. Suitable gloves should be worn when using such substances and the owner should provide suitable barrier creams which may help to protect the skin. The IMO/WHO/ILO Medical First Aid Guide should be consulted for accidents involving chemicals. Use of chemicals
  58. 58. 58
  59. 59. 1 Fatal Accident 100 Lost Time Injuries (LTI) 1,000 Non - Lost Time Injuries (Non-LTI) 10,000 Near Misses 100,000 UNSAFE PRACTICES Unsafe Acts + Unsafe Conditions 59 By aiming efforts at the base of the triangle, i.e. at unsafe practices, one is working directly on preventing accidents ever happening. INTRODUCTION
  60. 60. 60
  61. 61. ◦ Hazard/s, Danger and Accident are dependent of each other. ◦ By eliminating the source, accident can be prevented. ◦ Hazard is the source, therefore if one eliminates hazard/s, a SAFE CONDITION is achieved. 61
  62. 62. In some instance, not all hazards can be eliminated, but can be controlled. For example: In a tanker vessel loaded with cargo, the cargo is a hazard itself, we apply measures to this cargo by introducing inert gas in the tank to prevent fire or explosion. 62
  63. 63. 63 What can be done to address these risks? • develop a list of countermeasures that can be used to prevent or reduce the consequences associated with the hazards or potential accidents. Effective countermeasures are those that break the causal chain prior to the accident occurring. CAUSE INCIDENT ACCIDENT CONSEQUENCE Causal Chain DEVELOPING COUNTERMEASURES
  64. 64. 64 Countermeasures and Causal Chain Example
  65. 65. 65 Preventing Injuries & Accidents Information / Training Maintenance Following-up Reports Protective Equipment
  66. 66. Types of Hazards Physical  Heat  Noise  Vibration  Pressure changes  Radiation  Electric shock  Electrostatic 66 Control Measures ??? Chemical •Toxic / Poisonous substances •Reactive chemicals •Oxygen depleting chemicals Biological Microbial sources Ergonomic •Safety engineering •Repetitive stress Mind and Attitude •Neurosis •Psychosis •Personality Disorder
  67. 67.  The permit-to-work system is a method whereby safety procedures are specified in writing on a form issued to seafarers who are entrusted with a task which may involve work of a hazardous nature. 67
  68. 68.  Hot Work Permit  Cold Work Permit  Working Aloft Permit  Enclosed Space Entry Permit 68
  69. 69. 69 Hot work is any work involving welding or burning, and other work including certain drilling and grinding operations, electrical work and the use of non-intrinsically safe electrical equipment, which might produce an ignition source. A hot work permit is a document issued by a responsible person permitting specific hot work to be done during a specific time interval in a defined area.
  70. 70. 70 HOT WORK PERMIT CHECKLIST
  71. 71. 71 HOT WORK PERMIT
  72. 72. 72 Cold work is work which cannot create a source of ignition. That means that cold work relates to any work in hazardous or dangerous area which will not involve generation of temperature condition likely to be of sufficient intensity to cause ignition of combustible gases, vapors or liquid within of adjacent to the area involved. Examples: • Blanking / de-blanking • Disconnecting / connecting pipe • Spray painting • Brush / Roller painting or priming • Other chemical applications
  73. 73. 73
  74. 74. 74 Working aloft is defined as any work above normal reach and where personnel are faced with risk or falling more than 2 meters. Typical areas are the superstructure, funnel, masts, tanks. Engine room and the ship’s side using a stage, bosun’s chair, Jacob’s ladder or lifting up personnel with the safety harness in for example pump room or engine room emergency escape. Falling when performing work aloft can cause serious accidents. If proper safety precautions are taken, such work can be performed without accidents.
  75. 75. 75
  76. 76. 76 An enclosed space is one with restricted access that is not subject to continuous ventilation and in which the atmosphere may be hazardous due to the presence of hydrocarbon gas, toxic gases, inert gas or oxygen deficiency. Entry Enclose Space permit is a document issued by a responsible person permitting entry into a space or compartment during a specific time interval.
  77. 77. 77 Enclosed Space Entry Permit
  78. 78. 78
  79. 79. Risk Combination of likelihood of an event to occur and the consequence of the event. 79
  80. 80. Different Types of Vessel Risk factors  Structural Risk Factor  Machinery Risk Factor  Safety Equipment and Devices Risk Factor  Nautical and Communication Risk Factor  Environmental Protection Risk Factor 80
  81. 81. 81
  82. 82. Structural Risk 82
  83. 83. 83
  84. 84. Fast Rate Loading 84
  85. 85. Hogging 85
  86. 86. 86
  87. 87. 87
  88. 88. 88
  89. 89. 89 1.Lack of Maintenance 2.Disregarding and failure to report Risk Factors 3.Lack of awareness regarding risks 4.Mal-Operation CAUSES
  90. 90.  Propulsion System  Maneuvering System  Electric Power Supply System 90
  91. 91.  If one or more of the machinery sub system fails or be damage, the vessel will not be able to move. This is considered vital system in any ship with regards to safety. 91
  92. 92.  Main Engine  Gear  Shaft with coupling  Propeller 92
  93. 93.  The system is equally important since a ship without steering is in constant danger of grounding or colliding ship on congested water. 93
  94. 94.  Steering gear  Thruster  Rudder with shaft or coupling 94
  95. 95.  Electrical Power is vital for most functions onboard and a ship without power supply is a dead ship in the same situation as a vessel without steering 95
  96. 96.  Auxiliary engine  Generator  Switch Board 96
  97. 97. 97
  98. 98.  Fire hazard often develops in a machinery space because of small tolerances between heat source and ignitable materials, poor maintenance and bad housekeeping. 98
  99. 99. 99 SHIP ON FIRE
  100. 100. 100 Immediate actions to be taken when FIRE is discovered What shall I do? @#~%
  101. 101. 101 F I R E i n d What should you do ? n f o r m • Call the Bridge by phone. • Press the fire alarm button. e s t r i c t • Close the doors. • Cut off electrical power. • Remove sources of ignition. x t i n g u i s h • Use portable fire extinguishers. • Use the fire blanket.E s c a p e… • Let the Fire Teams do the job. Immediate actions to be taken when FIRE is discovered
  102. 102. 102 F I R i n d n f o r m e s t r i c t E s c a p e… Escape to a safe distance, in the vicinity of fire, to brief whoever is in charge : • the exact location of fire • what is burning • how long has it been burning • how did it start • what actions, if any, are being taken • details of casualties, if any Immediate actions to be taken when FIRE is discovered • Let the Fire Teams do the job.
  103. 103. 103 What am I doing? What could go wrong? How could it affect me, or others? How likely is it to happen? What can I do about it? HOTWORK An “initiative” before a task . . . . . .
  104. 104. 104 Definition: Risk Assessment - is a process for identifying hazards and assessing the risk (probability or consequence) posed by each.
  105. 105. 105 A.DEFINING THE PROBLEM What areas will this risk assessment evaluate? • define the scope of your assessment ( in the time you’ve set aside) 1. QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF • Do you have to look at every aspect of your operation? • Do you want to know where to get started in putting your greatest effort and resources in managing environmental or safety issues?
  106. 106. 106 B.IDENTIFYING HAZARDS AND POTENTIAL ACCIDENTS - get into more specific aspects of the assessment 1. QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF • What can go wrong? • Develop a list of hazards and related accidents that could occur • Do not limit yourself to only those accidents that have historically occurred.
  107. 107. 107 C.ASSIGNING FREQUENCY / LIKELIHOOD How often will it happen? • rate the likelihood of the hazard leading to an accident. • Decide how frequently each of the hazards and undesirable events listed in step C could become reality and cause harm.
  108. 108. Assign a rating of If the frequency is 1 REMOTE = Might occur once in a lifetime 2 OCCASIONAL = Might occur every five to ten years 3 LIKELY = Might occur every one to five years 4 PROBABLE = Might occur yearly 5 FREQUENT = Might occur more than once per year 108
  109. 109. 109 D.ASSIGNING CONSEQUENCES What is the impact ? • rate the impact of the hazard leading to an accident 1. QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF • How much damage would it cause?
  110. 110. 110
  111. 111. 111 E.DETERMINING RISK PRIORITY Where should efforts be focused ? • determine the risk priority score for each hazard The risk priority score, located where the two ratings intersect will fall into one of the following four general groups: • (VH) = Very High • (H) = High • (M) = Moderate • (L) = Low
  112. 112. 112 E.DETERMINING RISK PRIORITY Where should efforts be focused ? • (VH) = Very High • (H) = High • (M) = Moderate • (L) = Low
  113. 113. 113 E.= DETERMINING RISK PRIORITY Where should efforts be focused ? • (VH) = Very High • (H) = High • (M) = Moderate • (L) = Low
  114. 114.  Lifeboats ◦ Freefall ◦ Gravity  Liferafts  Firefighting Equipment 114
  115. 115. 115 Launching a Lifeboat by Gravity
  116. 116.  Swinging of the lifeboat on the ship side.  Accidental release of hooks.  Accidental breaking of the boat falls while being lowered.  Releasing of bowsing tackles.  Releasing of tricing pendants  Insufficiently trained crew. 116
  117. 117. 117 Non-conformance to the launching procedure.
  118. 118. 118 What am I doing? What could go wrong? How could it affect me, or others? How likely is it to happen? What can I do about it? An “initiative” before a task . . . . . . LIFEBOAT PREPARATION
  119. 119. 119
  120. 120. Overpressure 120
  121. 121. Risk involving navigational and communication equipment  Outdated navigational chart and publications  Communication equipment failure  Personnel  Incompetence  Insufficiency  No Cohesion 121
  122. 122. 122 COLLISION
  123. 123. 123 GROUNDING
  124. 124. 124 GROUNDING
  125. 125. Focusing on environmental issues is a trend of today. Awareness of environmental effects with regard to various types of pollution is important if we are to succeed in saving the globe. 125
  126. 126.  Mismanagement of ballasting operation  Lack of awareness of the MARPOL regulations  Inadequate implementation of policies (e.g. Drug and Alcohol policy) 126
  127. 127. 127
  128. 128. 128
  129. 129. 129 CAPTAIN In Overall Command (Chief Officer) COMMAND Spill Officer Safety Officer Oil Containment Deck Officer - 005 Oil Control (ECR) Chief Engineer Communications GMDSS Qualified Officer Deck Officer - 004 Oil Collection Deck Officer - 006
  130. 130. 130
  131. 131. 1. “Special Areas” are as defined in the regulations For the purposes of Annex V, the “special areas” are the:  Mediterranean Sea area  The Baltic Sea area  The Black Sea  The Red Sea  North Sea  Antarctic Sea  The Wider Caribbean Region  “Gulf areas" The "Gulf areas" means the sea area located north west of the rhumb line between Ras al Hadd (22 deg 30 min N, 59 deg 48 min E) and Ras el Fasteh (25deg 04minN, 61 deg 25minE). 131
  132. 132. 2. Comminuted or ground garbage must be able to pass through a screen with mesh size no larger than 25 mm. 132
  133. 133. 133 Every ship of 400 tons gross tonnage and above and every ship which is certified to carry 15 persons or more, shall carry a garbage management plan to be followed by the crew. The Plan shall provide written procedures for collecting, storing, processing and disposing of garbage, including the use of equipment on board. In addition the plan shall designate the person in charge of carrying out the plan.
  134. 134. 1. Plastic (Disposal PROHIBITED at sea). 134
  135. 135. 1. Plastic (Disposal PROHIBITED at sea). 2. Floating dunnage, lining, or packing materials (Disposal allowed at sea outside 25 nm). 135
  136. 136. 1. Plastic (Disposal PROHIBITED at sea). 2. Floating dunnage, lining, or packing materials (Disposal allowed at sea outside 25 nm). 3. Ground paper products, rags, glass, metal, bottles, crockery, etc (Disposal allowed at sea outside 3 nm). 136
  137. 137. 1. Plastic (Disposal PROHIBITED at sea). 2. Floating dunnage, lining, or packing materials (Disposal allowed at sea outside 25 nm). 3. Ground paper products, rags, glass, metal, bottles, crockery, etc (Disposal allowed at sea outside 3 nm). 4. Paper products, rags, glass, metal, bottles, crockery, etc (Disposal allowed at sea outside 12 nm). 137
  138. 138. 1. Plastic (Disposal PROHIBITED at sea). 2. Floating dunnage, lining, or packing materials (Disposal allowed at sea outside 25 nm). 3. Ground paper products, rags, glass, metal, bottles, crockery, etc (Disposal allowed at sea outside 3 nm). 4. Paper products, rags, glass, metal, bottles, crockery, etc (Disposal allowed at sea outside 12 nm). 5. Food waste (Disposal allowed outside 3 nm if ground, otherwise 12 nm). 138
  139. 139. 1. Plastic (Disposal PROHIBITED at sea). 2. Floating dunnage, lining, or packing materials (Disposal allowed at sea outside 25 nm). 3. Ground paper products, rags, glass, metal, bottles, crockery, etc (Disposal allowed at sea outside 3 nm). 4. Paper products, rags, glass, metal, bottles, crockery, etc (Disposal allowed at sea outside 12 nm). 5. Food waste (Disposal allowed outside 3 nm if ground, otherwise 12 nm). 6. Incinerator ash (Follow the most stringent requirement based on content). 139
  140. 140. 1. Plastic (Disposal PROHIBITED at sea). 2. Floating dunnage, lining, or packing materials (Disposal allowed at sea outside 25 nm). 3. Ground paper products, rags, glass, metal, bottles, crockery, etc (Disposal allowed at sea outside 3 nm). 4. Paper products, rags, glass, metal, bottles, crockery, etc (Disposal allowed at sea outside 12 nm). 5. Food waste (Disposal allowed outside 3 nm if ground, otherwise 12 nm). 6. Incinerator ash (Follow the most stringent requirement based on content). 140
  141. 141. 141
  142. 142. 142
  143. 143. 143 Neglecting only one of the Risk Factors related to either the vessel structure, machinery, safety equipment, navigation / communication and finally the environment may lead to a disaster...

Notas do Editor

  • OCIMF – OIL COMPANIES INTERNATIONAL MARINE FORUM
  • Let us advance to now, What are the hazards, Do groups magnify or compound the problem. What could go wrong, Could an accident happen here, how bad could it be? Could there be a fatality, Would you stop and say something if you came a crossed this in your work area?
  • PERHAPS YOU ONLY HAVE A SPECIFIC PROBLEM YOU WANT TO DEAL WITH. (ex. Hot work)
  • Let us advance to now, What are the hazards, Do groups magnify or compound the problem. What could go wrong, Could an accident happen here, how bad could it be? Could there be a fatality, Would you stop and say something if you came a crossed this in your work area?

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