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Leading in leaner times

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Leading in leaner times

  1. 1. LEADING IN LEANER TIMES @jontyfisher
  2. 2. WHAT HAPPENED MY CUSTOMER?
  3. 3. “Only when the tide goes out do you discover who has been swimming naked” Warren Buffet
  4. 4. WHERE HAS THAT LEFT MARKETERS? Confused Inconsistent Nervous Disempowered Schizophrenic Reactive
  5. 5. WHAT’S THE USUAL REACTION? Spending more money pushing the same message. This rarely works.  
  6. 6. WHAT’S THE USUAL REACTION? Trying to find safety in traditional quant research. It usually isn’t the answer.
  7. 7. WHAT’S THE USUAL REACTION? Stumbling through radical changes to the brand strategy, that aren’t based on true customer insights.  
  8. 8. WHAT’S THE USUAL REACTION? Trying to find absolute differentiation, which is increasingly becoming incredibly difficult.  
  9. 9. WHAT’S THE USUAL REACTION? Less than 1 in 5 brands in the US are seen by customers as being distinctive.   Source: www.brandingstrategyinsider.com
  10. 10. The answer lies in simple things ALL IS NOT LOST
  11. 11. THE BRAND GAPS COMPANY VALUE   COMPANY OR BRAND PURPOSE   CUSTOMER MOTIVATIONS, EMOTIONS, DRIVERS   BRAND PERFORMANCE GAP   NOT PRODUCT/SERVICE BRAND VALUE   CUSTOMER VALUE   CULTURE   REALISED BRAND POTENTIAL  
  12. 12. Marketing Myopia redux Inside out versus outside in thinking WHY IS THIS APPROACH IMPORTANT?
  13. 13. Brands often seem most interested in talking about: •  Who they are •  What they sell •  What it retails for •  Their size and geographical spread •  Their ownership •  Who their customers are (usually in demographic terms) •  Their financial performance •  Their innovations/news •  Their CSI projects and what they sponsor •  Their social media/content marketing initiatives WHY IS THIS APPROACH IMPORTANT?
  14. 14. Contrast that with consumer priorities: •  Is this brand desirable to me? •  Is this a brand I will be proud to be seen with? •  Is the brand well made? •  Is it easy and convenient for me to get it? •  Is the brand interesting? Do people talk about it? •  Who speaks for the brand? Are they someone I admire? •  Is the brand consistent? Do I get what I expect to get from it? •  Is it easy to understand? Is choosing options easy and simple? •  Is it priced right for me? WHY IS THIS APPROACH IMPORTANT?
  15. 15. Customers don’t care about brands. They care about how brands help them add value to - or solve a problem - in their lives. WHY IS THIS APPROACH IMPORTANT?
  16. 16. We have a flood of content, but a crisis of context. WHY IS THIS APPROACH IMPORTANT?
  17. 17. WHERE DO WE START? Embrace intelligent naivety
  18. 18. Understand the humanity of your customer – the emotions, motivations, desires and drivers at each stage of the engagement process, to understand how to deliver personal value to that customer. WHERE DO WE START?
  19. 19. THE BRAND GAPS COMPANY VALUE   COMPANY OR BRAND PURPOSE   CUSTOMER MOTIVATIONS, EMOTIONS, DRIVERS   BRAND PERFORMANCE GAP   NOT PRODUCT/SERVICE BRAND VALUE   CUSTOMER VALUE   CULTURE   REALISED BRAND POTENTIAL  
  20. 20. ANSWERING TWO QUESTIONS Answer two questions: Is your brand’s proposition in alignment with your company purpose?
  21. 21. GOLDEN CIRCLE WHY   HOW   WHAT  What do we do? What value to we add to our customers’ lives? How do we do that differently? ANSWERING TWO QUESTIONS
  22. 22. •  77% of consumers don’t want a relationship with a brand. •  Only 13% said increased engagement led to repeat brand preference (loyalty). •  64% cited shared values as the primary reason for brand preference. Source: Harvard Business Review study 2012 WHY   HOW   WHAT   ANSWERING TWO QUESTIONS
  23. 23. Answer two questions: Do you have a complete understanding of your customers’ engagement journey? ANSWERING TWO QUESTIONS
  24. 24. DOING FEELING THINKING MOMENTS OF TRUTH INSIGHTS BARRIERS HOW WE WIN HOW WE LOSE INFORMATION REQUIREMENTS TOOLS AWARENESS CONSIDERATION COMMITMENT REPEAT PREFERENCE ADVOCACY CULTURAL PRESSURES CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENT JOURNEY TOOL ANSWERING TWO QUESTIONS
  25. 25. Understand not just what your customer does, but why they do it. For a copy: Twitter @jontyfisher ANSWERING TWO QUESTIONS
  26. 26. ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! THE BEAUTIFUL PROBLEM ! STAGES ! ! DOING ! [TOUCHPOINTS & ACTIONS] ! ! THINKING CUSTOMER PORTRAIT! ! ! FEELING INSIGHTS CONSIDERATION PURCHASERESEARCH/AWARENESS POST-PURCHASE RETENTION & ADVOCACY MOMENTS OF TRUTH GUIDING! PRINCIPLES CLIENT: ! ! ! DATE: What am I doing, where am I looking for information? I feel… (emotions only) I feel anxious, I feel excited. Rational thinking and information needs Fresh, actionable & leveragable Critical points
  27. 27. ! ! ! !STAGES RETENTION & ADVOCACYPOST-PURCHASEPURCHASECONSIDERATIONRESEARCH/AWARENESS ! BARRIERS! LOSS WIN TOOLS INFORMATION! REQUIRED What stops them from moving further? How do brands win? How do brands fall by the wayside? What emotions do we need to reinforce or negate? What rational cues can we exploit? With all of this in mind, what do we need to start doing, change, or stop doing?
  28. 28. What you’re looking for? Fresh insights to connect your brand to your customer in a more meaningful way, to enable actionable, powerful changes to your marketing program. ANSWERING TWO QUESTIONS
  29. 29. DELIVERING A STRATEGIC PLATFORM CULTURAL TRUTH HUMAN TRUTH BRAND TRUTH Strategic Platform
  30. 30. SOME GUIDING THOUGHTS •  More than ever, people still want to be inspired, so don’t dumb down messages.  •  The familiar is even more important; rituals, and habits have renewed significance.  •  Meaning matters. •  Reward people, small things go a long way. •  People love a good deal, but don’t want to feel cheap.
  31. 31. SOME GUIDING THOUGHTS Be human.
  32. 32. SOME GUIDING THOUGHTS Be relevant.
  33. 33. SOME GUIDING THOUGHTS Be interesting.
  34. 34. “We live in a world filled with technology and connections and ideas yet one that, in so many ways and places, remains unexciting for such long stretches. On reflection, so many of the situations we find ourselves in are routine. Catching a plane is boring once you’ve done it a few times. Commuting is boring. Work cultures are uninspiring. Most of the advertising we see is boring. As Susan Ertz once observed, ‘Millions long for immortality who don’t know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon.’ 
  35. 35. After all, as human beings, we long for things that catch our eye. We will find time to do things that make our hearts beat faster. We live for what makes us feel alive. We want to be inspired by purpose.” “So rather than spend all that time noodling brand opinions and agonizing over the largely irrelevant nuance of ‘difference’ between our brand and the competition, we should be spending far more time thinking about what people are interested in.” Martin Weigel
  36. 36. THANKS FOR LISTENING @jontyfisher

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