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Website Usability & User Experience: Veel bezoekers, weinig klanten?

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Website Usability & User Experience: Veel bezoekers, weinig klanten?

  1. 1. Usability - Veel bezoekers, weinig klanten? VIGC Academy – 12.5.2016
  2. 2. Goals of this session •  Introduce a User Experience framework •  Learn how to do usability tests
  3. 3. User Experience Framework
  4. 4. UX framework CUSTOMER JOURNEY DESIGN VISION VALUE PROPOSITION CANVAS CUSTOMER INSIGHT MAP
  5. 5. Product/Service Needs Wants Concerns Customer Value proposition Technology Features User Experience Value Proposition Canvas Customer Experience Business goals
  6. 6. Product/Service Needs Wants Concerns Customer Value proposition Technology Features User Experience Value Proposition Canvas Customer Experience Business goals
  7. 7. “Nobody cares about your product or service like you do” Paul Boag – UX Consultant/Author/Speaker
  8. 8. h"p://bit.ly/1SsEYFf
  9. 9. “We zullen internet zijn. Of we zullen niet zijn” Philippe Neyt Commercial Director “To be or not to be” Focus on your business goals (aka don’t copy the giants)
  10. 10. Business goals •  Easy to understand form •  100% correct pricing •  Minimum abandon rate User needs •  Attractive price •  Guarantees •  Customer service •  Subscribe directly online
  11. 11. 10 times more online contracts than expected
  12. 12. Product/Service Needs Wants Concerns Customer Value proposition Technology Features User Experience Value Proposition Canvas Customer Experience Business goals
  13. 13. Product/Service Needs Wants Concerns Customer Value proposition Technology Features User Experience Value Proposition Canvas Customer Experience Business goals
  14. 14. Service: Date:Created by: Who is / will be involved in delivering the service? Who are / will be the key partners, suppliers and stakeholders? Through which channels (e.g. online, mobile, telephone, shop) is / should the service be available? Which channels are most cost effective? Which channels are users like to favour? Which key activities are required to deliver the service? What resources are required for those activities? Which are the most important activities? How will the service deliver an ROI? What are the costs vs the benefits? How can the service be delivered more cost effectively? How should / do users use the service? How frequently is / will the service be used? Why would someone use the service? What value does the service bring? Who are / will be the service users? Who are the most important users? What current challenges exist? What challenges do you foresee in the future? What other similar services are available? Who are the key competitors? What other options do users have? Which KPIs are / can be used to track the performance of the service? What are the key KPIs? USERS SERVICE DELIVERY PERFORMANCE RISKS 1. Users 2. Service proposition 5. Actors 6. Key activities 9. ROI 3. Channels 4. Usage 7. Challenges 8. Competitors 10. KPIs www.uxforthemasses.com h"p://www.uxforthemasses.com/updated-service-model-canvas/
  15. 15. Organize stakeholder workshops
  16. 16. TRUST THE PROCESS
  17. 17. VALUE PROPOSITION CANVAS CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS 1.  Value Proposition: Match business goals with user needs 2.  Product/Service: UX comes 1st, technology & features 2nd 3.  Customers: use a product/service model canvas
  18. 18. UX framework CUSTOMER JOURNEY DESIGN VISION VALUE PROPOSITION CUSTOMER INSIGHT MAP
  19. 19. Activities & Tasks VALUE PROPOSITION Technology & Location Behavior & Emotion ROLES Customer insight map Customer Experience Data & Information
  20. 20. Activities & Tasks VALUE PROPOSITION Technology & Location Behavior & Emotion ROLES Customer insight map Customer Experience Data & Information
  21. 21. Silicon Valley’s Youth Problem
  22. 22. http://bit.ly/1LZHgfA
  23. 23. Service safari
  24. 24. Activities & Tasks VALUE PROPOSITION Technology & Location Behavior & Emotion ROLES Customer insight map Customer Experience Data & Information
  25. 25. No? Then it’s time to GOOB Do you have sufficient answers?
  26. 26. Let's get out of this building…
  27. 27. …and enter into the real world
  28. 28. Meet customers
  29. 29. Do card sortings
  30. 30. CUSTOMER INSIGHT MAP CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS 1.  Stay (or become) extremely well-informed about what is happening in the world 2.  Go on safari 3.  GOOB
  31. 31. UX framework CUSTOMER JOURNEY DESIGN VISION VALUE PROPOSITION CUSTOMER INSIGHT MAP
  32. 32. Customer journey EXPERIENCE MAP SERVICE BLUEPRINT
  33. 33. http://bit.ly/1NLh2bZ
  34. 34. http://bit.ly/1RmSB68
  35. 35. Service blueprint
  36. 36. CUSTOMER JOURNEY CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS 1.  Try to anticipate on what will happen, every step of the way 2.  Create an experience map and a service blueprint
  37. 37. UX framework CUSTOMER JOURNEY DESIGN VISION VALUE PROPOSITION CUSTOMER INSIGHT MAP
  38. 38. h"p://www.higroup.com/wall/do-not-copy-giants
  39. 39. Design vision USABILITY PRINCIPLES DESIGNDESIGN PRINCIPLES
  40. 40. BASED ON HOW PEOPLE Feel Think HearSee InteractBehave Usability principles
  41. 41. Usability principles Usability principles Design theory UX research Project evidence
  42. 42. Scientific foundation for design decisions and interaction design principles The psychology of design how people see, read, remember, think, focus, interact, feel and decide Design theory Heuristic evaluation Usability goals learnability, efficiency, memorability, errors and satisfaction Design principles discoverability, feedback, affordances & signifiers, mapping and conceptual models
  43. 43. Dr. Susan Weinschenk •  Behavioral psychologist who has been working in the field of design and user experience •  ‘The Brain Lady’, who applies research on brain science to predict, understand and explains what motivates people and how they behave
  44. 44. Dr. Jakob ‘we know because we’ve seen it happen’ Nielsen •  Established the "discount usability engineering" movement for fast and cheap improvements of user interfaces •  Invented several usability methods, including heuristic evaluation •  Creator of Nielsen’s Alertbox, over 12 million page views per year Widely regarded for his expertise in internet & intranet design.
  45. 45. Dr. Donald Norman •  Director of The Design Lab, University of California, San Diego •  Co-founder & consultant at Nielsen Norman Group Widely regarded for his expertise in the fields of design, usability engineering and cognitive science.
  46. 46. B = MAT Dr. B.J. Fogg, Director of the Persuasive Technology Lab at Stanford University •  In human speak: when you want a certain behavior from your customer (buying things), you need: 1.  to have something that motivates him (attractive things he wants) 2.  give him the ability to perform that action (a website) 3.  provide a trigger that will entice him to take action (a voucher) •  Usability is an essential ingredient of the formula, in particular of the element ability. Ability without usability is a recipe for failure. http://behaviormodel.org •  ‘A behavior (B) will occur when motivation (M), ability (A) and a trigger (T) are present at the same time and in sufficient degrees.’
  47. 47. UX research Examples, practices, inspiration, connecting dots,…
  48. 48. h"ps://goo.gl/JADBMw
  49. 49. h"ps://goo.gl/13sXo3
  50. 50. •  Not recognizable as such •  “Help, they’re moving around” → auto-forwarding •  Difficult to interact with Source: Usability Geek - http://bit.ly/YNzTR1 CAROUSEL FAILURES
  51. 51. 1.  Stick to a maximum of 4 frames 2.  Show how many frames there are, and where the user is within the “progression” 3.  Use crisp-looking text and images 4.  Be careful with auto-forward 5.  Present in a creative & useful way Source: Nielsen Norman Group - http://bit.ly/1ljtqav CAROUSEL SUCCESS
  52. 52. •  Complex layout •  Insufficient product information •  Tiny product images •  Absence of product videos •  Poor customer service pages Source: Usability Geek - http://bit.ly/YNzTR1 PRODUCT PAGE FAILURES
  53. 53. “On the homepage business can do what they like. But in the funnel, we’re calling the shots.” Willem Wijnen – Chief Marke1ng & E-commerce Officer at The S1ng
  54. 54. 1.  a recognizable layout: people have learned to use product pages on other websites, not on yours 2.  elaborate product information: this is the only place on a website where you can unleash your inner writer – with moderation 3.  very large product images: in a physical store you don’t decide on the quality of a product from 2 meters away either, do you? A GOOD PRODUCT PAGE
  55. 55. 4.  product videos: optional today, elementary in the near future 5.  easy accessible customer support: easy to find, just like you expect from real-life shop assistants 6.  a clear and simple call-to-action (‘add to bag’): how long are you willing to search for the cash register in a bricks-and- mortar store? A GOOD PRODUCT PAGE
  56. 56. Project evidence Experience from projects
  57. 57. 1.  People are motivated by mastery, progress & control •  People love getting things done. It makes them feel they’re doing something useful. •  People love it when they can act autonomously. It gives them the feeling that they’re smart and powerful. •  People love choice. If you give them choice, they feel they're are in control - which they aren’t. Usability principles
  58. 58. 2.  People believe that things that are close together belong together •  If two items are close to each other, people assume they belong together. Usability principles
  59. 59. 3.  People search for cues that tell them what to do •  Modern, flat design trends have made this a lot worse. •  You’ll see people start helicoptering and hovering when they don’t get enough cues. •  On touch, they get completely lost. Usability principles
  60. 60. 4.  People scan screens based on past experiences and expectations •  People are lazy by nature. If no effort is required, no effort will be done. •  Look around and translate good experiences in your design. •  In the mind of a user, a website is a simple thing: •  a logo •  primary navigation •  a search box •  utilities •  content •  (that’s it) Usability principles
  61. 61. Design vision USABILITY PRINCIPLES DESIGNDESIGN PRINCIPLES
  62. 62. 1 2 3 Design principles Principle Principle Principle DESIGN
  63. 63. Usability principles Design principles 1.  People are motivated by mastery, progress and control 1.  Put the user in control 2.  People believe things that are close together belong together 2.  Make it simple and clear 3.  People search for cues that tell them what to do 3.  Don’t make me think 4.  People scan screens based on previous experiences 4.  Use common patterns
  64. 64. 1 2 4 Design principles Put the user in control Use common patterns DESIGN 3 Make it simple and clear Don’t make me think
  65. 65. PEOPLE ARE MOTIVATED BY MASTERY, PROGRESS & CONTROL
  66. 66. PEOPLE ARE MOTIVATED BY MASTERY, PROGRESS & CONTROL
  67. 67. PEOPLE SEARCH FOR CUES THAT TELL THEM WHAT TO DO
  68. 68. PEOPLE SEARCH FOR CUES THAT TELL THEM WHAT TO DO
  69. 69. PEOPLE SEARCH FOR CUES THAT TELL THEM WHAT TO DO
  70. 70. DESIGN VISION CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS 1.  Don’t start with sketching, unless you’re building something really, really simple & straightforward 2.  Familiarize yourself with design theory, UX research and project evidence 3.  Use usability & design principles to drive the design process
  71. 71. How to test
  72. 72. Designing = visualising assumptions Assumptions need to be investigated whether they are true (or not) Testing ≈ Lean UX principle
  73. 73. How to validate? Quantitative tests Qualitative tests What? Prove Statistically significant Many users Minimal interaction – A/B testing Why? Improve What needs fixing Few users Interactive observation – live testing
  74. 74. https://vwo.com/ab-testing/ A/B testing – what is it?
  75. 75. https://vwo.com/ab-testing/ A/B testing – what can you test?
  76. 76. A/B TESTING CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS 1.  Create well grounded UX-hypotheses 2.  Focus on what drives conversion (home page, landing page, product page, checkout, CtA’s, banners, headlines,…) 3.  Make it statistically significant (calculators) 4.  Your A/B test must not kill UX 5.  Don’t use it as an excuse to stop ‘GOOBing’
  77. 77. USERS Feel Think HearSee Interact Behave Live testing
  78. 78. Live testing •  With real representative users, in the user’s habitat •  One-on-one •  Using task-oriented test scripts •  Via think aloud method
  79. 79. When to test?
  80. 80. How much testing? 5 = 80% 1 > 0
  81. 81. Cold shower, anyone?
  82. 82. Always keep in mind that… You are NOT your average user •  Neither is your developer •  Neither is any other member of your team (or the company) Test with REAL users
  83. 83. “In my whole life, I have known no wise people (over a broad subject matter area) who didn't read all the time -- none, zero.” Charles Thomas Munger - American business magnate, lawyer, investor, and philanthropist.
  84. 84. Contact us De Regenboog 11 2800 Mechelen Belgium www.higroup.com +32 (0)15 40 01 38 Follow us Human Interface Group @higroup Human Interface Groupjohan.verhaegen@higroup.com Thank you and good luck!

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