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By: Amy E. Lingenfelter
English Language Fellow
Quito, Ecuador
alingenfelter@peopleleap.com
www.peopleleap.com
• “The purpose of art is washing the dust of
daily life off our souls.” –Pablo Picasso
• “Art imitates life.” –Common expr...
• “A great teacher is a great artist. Teaching is
the greatest of the arts since the medium is
the human mind and spirit r...
• “The aim of art is to represent not the
outward appearance of things, but their
inward significance.” –Aristotle
• “Crea...
• What is art?
 2-dimensional images: oil/acrylic
paintings, watercolor paintings, drawings,
illustrated books, photograp...
• Teachers (you!) will explore the benefits and
strategies for teaching language through
visual arts activities.
• Teacher...
1) It’s a waste of time to use visual arts as a
learning tool in language classes.
2) Having skills in the visual arts is ...
1) Draw a picture of your hometown or
something that reminds you of it.
2) IN A LANGUAGE THAT IS NOT YOUR FIRST, try
to de...
Research about the brain suggests:
• It is important to teach language in multiple
ways:
 Through the 5 senses.
 By crea...
• When more parts of the brain are activated,
more areas store data about just one piece of
information.
• As a result, a ...
• Art is important to language learning because:
 Students learn through various ways and
senses, so:
o It stimulates mul...
• It naturally and automatically makes use of most
multiple intelligences (Gardner, 1983)
• It naturally and automatically makes use of 3
main learning styles:
• Art contextualizes and illustrates the English concept
that is being taught:
 Art “shows not tells.”
• It imitates and ...
• Art is so “open to interpretation” that it
generates endless ideas/language.
• It’s easy and practical to implement.
• I...
• It allows and encourages:
 Creative/individual/free expression.
 Students to explore feelings in a safe way.
 Motivat...
Two basic ways that students can use art to
learn and practice English in the classroom:
1) Through the process of creatin...
2) Students learn and practice English by
using other people’s images for analysis and
description:
 Teacher brings artis...
• Any work of art created or displayed in a
language class can be used to do the
following for a language point:
 Practic...
• Themes of artwork should be based on
students’ real lives and backgrounds.
• Language mini-lessons prior to (or at strat...
• Name at least 3 language points that could
be taught through the process of students
creating their own artwork!
• Artwork can be used to teach a variety of
grammar points and vocabulary, including:
 Colors, shapes, and sizes
 Locati...
• Art can be used to depict almost any
vocabulary word!
• When students illustrate a word they’re
learning, they make stro...
Part/s of Speech
Synonym
Antonym
Definition/s: (Include part of speech and two complete definitions from the dictionary)
1...
Use art to create written/spoken English:
• One artwork or a series of works can be used
to do the following in both oral ...
• “Jigsaw” reading art activity:
1 2 3
1 2 3
• Descriptive Essay Assignment: “My Dream World”
• Descriptive Essay Assignment: “My Dream World”
(INTRODUCTION):
If you could wave a magic wand and the world could
become...
Use written/spoken English to create art:
• A text or aural recording can be used to
create a work of art that illustrates...
• “Jigsaw” reading art activity:
1 2 3
1 2 3
Examples:
• Guessing games:
 What or whose artwork is this? (oral description)
 Match the written description to the wor...
Examples:
• Picture description (Ex. Blind listening game)
• Art Pictionary
• Example: “Where’s Waldo?”
1) Choose your language and/or content
objective:
 Think carefully about what language point
you want the art activity to...
4) Plan for assessment:
 Distinguish between informal and formal
assessment.
 Summative presentation/show should
demonst...
Examples of Art-Related Language Objectives:
• Students will be able to (SWBAT)….
 (SPEAKING/VOCABULARY): Use descriptive...
5) Consider carefully:
 Materials
 Time activities will take
 Class size
 Student age
 English proficiency
 Art prof...
CLASS DESCRIPTION:
• Refugee adolescent and adult students will simultaneously explore
acrylic painting and learn English ...
SPECIFICS:
• Class Size: Around 15 students. This size is optimal for
acquisition of both language and artistic skills and...
• Class Schedule/Timing: Once a week for 3 hours per
session for a total of 7 weeks. This will allow most
students to have...
• Art Background/Proficiency: No prior art background or
proficiency is required. Students may range from beginner to
expe...
Objectives:
Students will be able to. . .
• Paint an image of something important to them from their
home country, culture...
Objectives:
Students will be able to . . .
• Use presentation skills and strategies to deliver a clear and
convincing expl...
Objectives:
Students will be able to . . .
• Use questioning techniques, as well as vocabulary and
grammar previously lear...
ASSESSMENT:
• Informal Assessment (Speaking & Listening/Conversation):
Each class will involve informal assessment of both...
• Formal Assessment (Speaking): At the conclusion of the 7-week
session, each student will deliver a presentation of his/h...
Let’s explore the ways that a student could use the
following works of art to learn and practice English:
Let’s explore the ways that a student could use the
following work of art to learn and practice English:
Let’s explore the ways that a student could use the
following work of art to learn and practice English:
CATEGORICAL/ABSTRACT/
LOGICAL FOCUS
(This doesn’t belong in the abstract
category of “tools” as we categorize
and define t...
• Every student views and understands an
image using their own personal logic, which:
 Is affected by the student’s backg...
• Use pop art or famous works from different
cultures:
 Students analyze culture through art.
 Students create art repre...
 For example, busy American city life vs.
couple relaxing and aspiring for something
to happen.
o Ex. Concept of “time” a...
• Use text explaining various aspects of
American culture, which students later
depict in art form.
Let’s explore the ways that a teacher could use the
following works of art to teach English and culture:
Let’s explore the ways that a teacher could use the
following works of art to teach English and culture:
Let’s explore the ways that a teacher could use the
following works of art to teach English and culture:
Let’s explore the ways that a teacher could use the
following works of art to teach English and culture:
1) It’s a waste of time to use visual arts as a
learning tool in language classes.
2) Having skills in the visual arts is ...
Task (5 minutes): Briefly brainstorm a lesson objective in
which you teach language and culture through art.
Examples of A...
• With your previous group members and notes,
create one lesson plan that incorporates a
visual arts activity.
• Write the...
Please include the following components in your
lesson plan:
1) OBJECTIVES (what you want to students to
know and do by th...
• http://americanenglish.state.gov/resources/cr
eate-communicate-art-activities-efl-classroom
• Bain, K. (2013) “Learning Through Song,
Drama, Play, Art.”
• Gardner, R. (1983) “Multiple Intelligences and
Education.”
...
• My website: www.peopleleap.com.
Go to:
 Resources
 Amy’s Professional Blog
• My email: alingenfelter@peopleleap.com
• ...
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts
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[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts

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Presented by Senior English Language Fellow Amy Lingenfelter. Please find the following address to watch the webinar http://youtu.be/DxzdyRHycYA

Publicada em: Educação, Tecnologia
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[RELO] Teaching Language and Culture Through the Visual Arts

  1. 1. By: Amy E. Lingenfelter English Language Fellow Quito, Ecuador alingenfelter@peopleleap.com www.peopleleap.com
  2. 2. • “The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls.” –Pablo Picasso • “Art imitates life.” –Common expression
  3. 3. • “A great teacher is a great artist. Teaching is the greatest of the arts since the medium is the human mind and spirit rather than the brush.” –John Steinbeck
  4. 4. • “The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.” –Aristotle • “Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.” –Scott Adams
  5. 5. • What is art?  2-dimensional images: oil/acrylic paintings, watercolor paintings, drawings, illustrated books, photography, murals.  3-dimensional images: sculpture, pottery, jewelry, carvings, printmaking, and other crafts.
  6. 6. • Teachers (you!) will explore the benefits and strategies for teaching language through visual arts activities. • Teachers (you!) will learn how to apply these strategies and ideas to:  Make English more fun and engaging.  Encourage and maximize communication.  Teach about and explore English-speaking cultures.  Appreciate the arts and improve art skills.
  7. 7. 1) It’s a waste of time to use visual arts as a learning tool in language classes. 2) Having skills in the visual arts is important in today’s society. 3) It is the teacher’s job to make learning fun. 4) Visual arts are fun for most children. 5) Students need to learn the same concept in different ways in order to retain information. 6) Visual arts only works with younger children. 7) Culture and society are best represented through the arts.
  8. 8. 1) Draw a picture of your hometown or something that reminds you of it. 2) IN A LANGUAGE THAT IS NOT YOUR FIRST, try to describe the drawing in that language:  The steps you’re taking to draw the image.  The things it contains.  A story behind it.  Why you chose that subject and what it means to you. 3) Was there any language you didn’t/don’t know that could make this easier?
  9. 9. Research about the brain suggests: • It is important to teach language in multiple ways:  Through the 5 senses.  By creating cross-curricular connections.  It activates more “dendric pathways” of the brain. – Wolfe, P. (2001).
  10. 10. • When more parts of the brain are activated, more areas store data about just one piece of information. • As a result, a person fully learns, instead of just memorizing. – Wolfe, P. (2001).
  11. 11. • Art is important to language learning because:  Students learn through various ways and senses, so: o It stimulates multiple parts of the brain. o This leads to higher levels of retention.  It “kisses the brain!”
  12. 12. • It naturally and automatically makes use of most multiple intelligences (Gardner, 1983)
  13. 13. • It naturally and automatically makes use of 3 main learning styles:
  14. 14. • Art contextualizes and illustrates the English concept that is being taught:  Art “shows not tells.” • It imitates and enhances students’ realities. • It incorporates all aspects of language. • It can be used to teach almost any language topic/skill. H a p p y
  15. 15. • Art is so “open to interpretation” that it generates endless ideas/language. • It’s easy and practical to implement. • It makes learning English fun!
  16. 16. • It allows and encourages:  Creative/individual/free expression.  Students to explore feelings in a safe way.  Motivation.  Learning autonomy.  Students to create their own fantasy worlds.
  17. 17. Two basic ways that students can use art to learn and practice English in the classroom: 1) Through the process of creating their own images:  Understanding the process of HOW to complete the work.  Communicating this process with classmates or teachers.  Explaining/describing their work.  Illustrating a segment of language.
  18. 18. 2) Students learn and practice English by using other people’s images for analysis and description:  Teacher brings artistic images to the classroom.  Students discuss classmates’ works of art.
  19. 19. • Any work of art created or displayed in a language class can be used to do the following for a language point:  Practice  Express  Describe  Illustrate • The above can be done in both spoken and written form.
  20. 20. • Themes of artwork should be based on students’ real lives and backgrounds. • Language mini-lessons prior to (or at strategic points during) art activity work best. • Summative presentation activity/final art show using learned language points is key!
  21. 21. • Name at least 3 language points that could be taught through the process of students creating their own artwork!
  22. 22. • Artwork can be used to teach a variety of grammar points and vocabulary, including:  Colors, shapes, and sizes  Locations  Prepositions of all kinds  Adjectives  Verbs  Vocabulary  Grammar of all kinds
  23. 23. • Art can be used to depict almost any vocabulary word! • When students illustrate a word they’re learning, they make stronger associations and retain the information:  Students draw an image that reminds them of the meaning.  Students create art using learned vocabularly and use it in their final show.
  24. 24. Part/s of Speech Synonym Antonym Definition/s: (Include part of speech and two complete definitions from the dictionary) 1) 2) Use the word in 2 sentences: 1) 2) Draw a Picture: Word Write the word seven times: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7)
  25. 25. Use art to create written/spoken English: • One artwork or a series of works can be used to do the following in both oral and written form:  Tell a story  Interpret/analyze  Describe • Make sure that the written or spoken part also fulfills a language objective/s.
  26. 26. • “Jigsaw” reading art activity: 1 2 3 1 2 3
  27. 27. • Descriptive Essay Assignment: “My Dream World”
  28. 28. • Descriptive Essay Assignment: “My Dream World” (INTRODUCTION): If you could wave a magic wand and the world could become the way you’ve always dreamed, how would you design it? If I could create my own dream world, it would be ideal in so many ways. It would have stellar schools and universities, a scenic environment, benevolent people, a democratic government, ample job and career opportunities, and abundant food and drink surrounding us. Although my dream world is a bit unrealistic, it is important to be aware of it so that I can always work towards the highest goal possible. In the following paragraphs, I will describe this world in detail.
  29. 29. Use written/spoken English to create art: • A text or aural recording can be used to create a work of art that illustrates it:  Class murals after reading a book.  Painting representing an essay.  Illustration of a recorded conversation.  Fiction children’s book.
  30. 30. • “Jigsaw” reading art activity: 1 2 3 1 2 3
  31. 31. Examples: • Guessing games:  What or whose artwork is this? (oral description)  Match the written description to the work • Classroom competition: best written story based on classmate’s or own artwork • Running Dictation game
  32. 32. Examples: • Picture description (Ex. Blind listening game) • Art Pictionary
  33. 33. • Example: “Where’s Waldo?”
  34. 34. 1) Choose your language and/or content objective:  Think carefully about what language point you want the art activity to teach/practice.  Use art activities that will allow students to meet that objective. 2) Consider your ultimate course goals. 3) Try to incorporate a combination of reading, writing, listening, and speaking activities.
  35. 35. 4) Plan for assessment:  Distinguish between informal and formal assessment.  Summative presentation/show should demonstrate all learned skills/content.  How will you ask students to use artwork to show the language they have learned?  What exactly will students be able to do by the end of the lesson?
  36. 36. Examples of Art-Related Language Objectives: • Students will be able to (SWBAT)….  (SPEAKING/VOCABULARY): Use descriptive adjectives to orally compare and contrast a painting created of their hometown to a photo of a city in the U.S.A.  (GRAMMAR/WRITING): Use the present simple tense and present progressive verb tenses to write what is happening in their painting in a short paragraph.  (LISTENING): Listen to an oral description of a painting in the room given by an instructor and, based on what he/she hears, identify the painting the instructor is referring to.
  37. 37. 5) Consider carefully:  Materials  Time activities will take  Class size  Student age  English proficiency  Art proficiency
  38. 38. CLASS DESCRIPTION: • Refugee adolescent and adult students will simultaneously explore acrylic painting and learn English in a studio setting. Projects will be individualized, based on the goals and interests of the students, with a general common theme relating to their lives in their home countries and/or their current ones. • Painting techniques will be taught using the classic Baroque style and their paintings should be based on a photograph or realistic image of their choosing. • Simultaneously, instructors will use class time to teach English vocabulary words, grammar, conversation skills, and presentation skills. • Emphasis will be on oral and listening skills although instructors should also present language in written form. • At the end of the class, students will be asked to present their painting to the class and describe the colors, subjects, theme setting/context, and story surrounding the painting.
  39. 39. SPECIFICS: • Class Size: Around 15 students. This size is optimal for acquisition of both language and artistic skills and allows for more individualized instruction and opportunities to practice speaking English. • Age Range: Adolescents or adults ages 14 and up. We are focusing on older children and adults for this class because elementary-age refugee children have more opportunities for language-learning and art enrichment in the Buffalo public schools they likely attend. Older children and adults also have greater difficulty acquiring the phonetics, pronunciation, and in many cases the vocabulary of a second language; therefore, an additional language learning opportunity would be beneficial.
  40. 40. • Class Schedule/Timing: Once a week for 3 hours per session for a total of 7 weeks. This will allow most students to have at least one finished product by the end of the session and to give a presentation describing their painting. • The first 30 minutes of each class will include a mini-lesson of some aspect of the English language. • The following 20-30 minutes will include a demonstration of a particular painting technique and/or art-related language instruction. The rest of the time will be devoted to painting and consultation, while the instructors continually advise students on an individual and as-needed basis. • Location: Buffalo Arts Studio, TriMain building, Buffalo, NY.
  41. 41. • Art Background/Proficiency: No prior art background or proficiency is required. Students may range from beginner to experienced, although there is a preference for students who have some experience with drawing and/or painting. Strong interest in painting is essential. • English Language Proficiency: Many refugee adults arrive in Buffalo with very little English language ability. For the first 7- week session, we are proposing to recruit adults who are of beginning level with limited conversational ability. For the future, other levels may be incorporated. In addition to the language benefits, students will benefit from using art to express themselves in ways they are unable using English. • Instructors: One NY-State certified ESL (English as a Second Language) instructor and one NY-State certified art instructor.
  42. 42. Objectives: Students will be able to. . . • Paint an image of something important to them from their home country, culture, religion, family, etc. OR their current one using acrylic on canvas and applying the classical Baroque technique. (It must be a subject that will lend itself to delivering a presentation with a culturally-based theme). • Orally identify and/or define the following art-related content vocabulary: colors, tones, values, shapes, shadows, dark vs. light, blend, mix, soft edges, paint, paint brush, etc. • Deliver a 5-10 minute presentation describing the colors, subjects, theme, setting/context, and story surrounding the painting to the class. • Use descriptive adjectives (colors, physical attributes, personality characteristics, etc.) to describe their painting orally.
  43. 43. Objectives: Students will be able to . . . • Use presentation skills and strategies to deliver a clear and convincing explanation of their painting. • Use grammar “there is/are” and “there was/were” to describe their painting orally. • Use the present simple tense and present progressive verb tenses to describe what is happening in their painting orally. • (If applicable): Use the past simple tense and past progressive verb tenses to describe the past context of their painting orally. • Comprehend the main idea of their classmates’ presentations. • Listen to an oral description of a painting in the room given by an instructor and identify the painting the instructor is referring to.
  44. 44. Objectives: Students will be able to . . . • Use questioning techniques, as well as vocabulary and grammar previously learned, to conduct an impromptu conversation with a partner about their partner’s painting. They must describe it using English they learned as well as the description their partner provided in his/her presentation. They must also ask their partner further questions about it. Their partner is expected to help clarify any inaccuracies in English.
  45. 45. ASSESSMENT: • Informal Assessment (Speaking & Listening/Conversation): Each class will involve informal assessment of both English and artistic skills provided by both instructors on an individual, one-to-one, as-needed basis. The class will also allow for informal conversation in English between students from a variety of language and cultural backgrounds. All informal assessments will be conducted in English.
  46. 46. • Formal Assessment (Speaking): At the conclusion of the 7-week session, each student will deliver a presentation of his/her painting that depicts something important from their home country, culture, religion, family, etc. OR their current one using language previously learned (see “Class Objectives” above for more details). • Formal Assessment (Speaking and Listening): 1) After listening to their classmates’ presentations of their paintings, each student will orally describe and/or ask questions about a randomly assigned partner’s painting using language previously learned and heard in the presentation. (This impromptu conversation is intended to evaluate students’ natural acquisition of the language as opposed to that which was planned or staged). 2) The second listening assessment is the oral description of a painting in the group and identification of the painting the instructor is referring to.
  47. 47. Let’s explore the ways that a student could use the following works of art to learn and practice English:
  48. 48. Let’s explore the ways that a student could use the following work of art to learn and practice English:
  49. 49. Let’s explore the ways that a student could use the following work of art to learn and practice English:
  50. 50. CATEGORICAL/ABSTRACT/ LOGICAL FOCUS (This doesn’t belong in the abstract category of “tools” as we categorize and define them in our culture and language) PHYSICAL MATERIALS FOCUS (This is the only object that doesn’t contain the material wood) EMOTIONAL FOCUS (Example: the person has a negative emotional memory of getting hurt by a saw as a child) UTILITY/CONCRETE FOCUS (You can’t use this object with the other three; the other two objects can be used to cut the log; a hammer is useless especially without a nail)
  51. 51. • Every student views and understands an image using their own personal logic, which:  Is affected by the student’s background.  Affects how students interpret and create an image. • Use this to your advantage when using images/artwork to teach English. • Personal interpretations are the key to communicative language expression!
  52. 52. • Use pop art or famous works from different cultures:  Students analyze culture through art.  Students create art representing their own culture and compare it with art from others.
  53. 53.  For example, busy American city life vs. couple relaxing and aspiring for something to happen. o Ex. Concept of “time” as rigid vs. relaxed.
  54. 54. • Use text explaining various aspects of American culture, which students later depict in art form.
  55. 55. Let’s explore the ways that a teacher could use the following works of art to teach English and culture:
  56. 56. Let’s explore the ways that a teacher could use the following works of art to teach English and culture:
  57. 57. Let’s explore the ways that a teacher could use the following works of art to teach English and culture:
  58. 58. Let’s explore the ways that a teacher could use the following works of art to teach English and culture:
  59. 59. 1) It’s a waste of time to use visual arts as a learning tool in language classes. 2) Having skills in the visual arts is important in today’s society. 3) It is the teacher’s job to make learning fun. 4) Visual arts are fun for most children. 5) Students need to learn the same concept in different ways in order to retain information. 6) Visual arts only works with younger children. 7) Culture and society are best represented through the arts.
  60. 60. Task (5 minutes): Briefly brainstorm a lesson objective in which you teach language and culture through art. Examples of Art-Related Language Objectives: • Students will be able to (SWBAT)….  (SPEAKING/VOCABULARY): Use descriptive adjectives to orally compare and contrast a painting created of their hometown to a photo of a city in the U.S.A.  (GRAMMAR/WRITING): Use the present simple tense and present progressive verb tenses to write what is happening in their painting in a short paragraph.  (LISTENING): Listen to an oral description of a painting in the room given by an instructor and, based on what he/she hears, identify the painting the instructor is referring to.
  61. 61. • With your previous group members and notes, create one lesson plan that incorporates a visual arts activity. • Write the final version of the lesson plan on chart paper to present to your classmates. • Be ready to justify your lesson and why you chose this particular activity. • Be ready to demonstrate/act out the best part of this lesson (5 minutes total) to the whole group based on some strategies/ theories you learned today (a “mini-lesson”). Pretend we all are your students.
  62. 62. Please include the following components in your lesson plan: 1) OBJECTIVES (what you want to students to know and do by the end of the lesson): Write “S.W.B.A.T.” (Students Will Be Able To. . .) 2) PROCEDURE/STEPS (includes teacher and student activity) 3) TIMING (how long each activity will take) 4) ASSESSMENT/SUCCESS INDICATORS (student demonstration of actual learning) 5) MATERIALS (if any)
  63. 63. • http://americanenglish.state.gov/resources/cr eate-communicate-art-activities-efl-classroom
  64. 64. • Bain, K. (2013) “Learning Through Song, Drama, Play, Art.” • Gardner, R. (1983) “Multiple Intelligences and Education.” • Wolfe, P. (2001). “Brain Matters: Translating Research into Classroom Practices.”
  65. 65. • My website: www.peopleleap.com. Go to:  Resources  Amy’s Professional Blog • My email: alingenfelter@peopleleap.com • Shaping the Way We Teach English Website: http://oelp.uoregon.edu/shaping • American English Website: http://americanenglish.state.gov

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