Baking cookies

imkaelah
Baking cookies
1. Define and enumerate the ingredients, tools, and
equipment needed in baking different kinds of cookies.
2. Identify the different kinds of cookies and their
characteristics.
3. Demonstrate the procedures that should be followed
in baking cookies.
4. Prepare a score card for judging baked cookies.
5. Express delight and satisfaction for being able to
bake cookies.
Objectives:
Baking
Cookies
Baking cookies
Cookies - are little cakes, flat, small and sweet.
Some cookies are light and other are dark. Some
are decked with fruits or nuts and others trimmed
with frostings and decorations.
Cookies are popular. They go well with any
occasion. They go a long way and can be
prepared at leisure and can be stored for busy
days.
What is a cookies?
In the United States and Canada, a cookie is a small, flat-baked
round delicacy, containing milk, flour, eggs, and sugar. In most
English-speaking countries outside North America, the most
common word for this is biscuit; in many regions both terms are
used, while in others the two words have different meanings—a
cookie is a plain bun in Scotland, while in the United States a
biscuit is a kind of quick bread similar to a scone.
In the United Kingdom the term cookie often just refers
to chocolate chip cookies or a variation (e.g. cookies
containing oats, Smarties).
A basic biscuit recipe includes flour, shortening (often
lard), baking powder or soda, milk (buttermilk or sweet
milk) and sugar. Common savory variations involve
substituting sugar with an ingredient such as cheese or
other dairy products. Shortbread is a popular biscuit in
the UK.
Appearance
Soft
Dry
Rough
Moist
Smooth
Tender
Characteristics of
Cookies
Texture
Thin
Thick
Flavor
Salty
Sweet
The dry ingredients consist of all-purpose flour, baking
powder, baking soda and salt.
The sweetness comes from granulated and/or brown
sugar.
The fat is either softened butter or margarine and
sometimes shortening. Eggs and vanilla extract are also
used.
For different flavored cookies you can add any or all of
these: chocolate, cocoa, nuts, raisins, oatmeal, spices
or extracts.
INGREDIENTS
Butter is a fat that adds an utterly delicious quality to all
baked goods, including cookies. Too much
butter, however, can lead to cookies that flatten and crisp
when baked. Margarine can be used instead of butter but
some low fat choices have a little more water which
makes it a better choice for crispier cookies than chewy
ones. Shortening can help the flour and eggs set before
spreading yet offers little or no flavor. A third choice for fat
is to combine shortening with the butter but we champion
butter for its flavor.
All about ingredients
Sweeteners like brown sugar and honey.
Help to retain moisture and provide a chewier
texture. Too much sugar, however, will flatten
the cookie because sugars liquefy under heat.
Like mixing fats, mixing is a possible choice:
consider a balance of honey or molasses with
brown sugar.
All-purpose or pastry flour
Is best used for lighter cookies. For chewy chunky
cookies use bread flour with its powerful gluten or
cake flour which has absorbent starch; each can
curb cookie spread.
Egg yolks
Create chewier cookies than whole eggs.
DROP COOKIES - are made from soft dough which is
dropped in a greased baking sheet with the use of a
spoon.
Examples: Chocolate chip cookies, peanut butter
cookies, and oatmeal (or oatmeal raisin) cookies are popular
examples of drop cookies.
* ROLLED COOKIES - are made from stiff dough but soft
enough to be handled and cut into shapes with a cookie
cutter.
Example: Gingerbread men
kinds of Cookies
SHEET OR BAR COOKIES - are made from batter similar
to the consistency of sponge cake or butter cake. In British
English, bar cookies are known as "tray bakes.“ Consist of
batter, cheese, or other ingredients that are poured or
pressed into a pan and cut into cookie-sized pieces after
baking. It is prepared by putting the dough in a rectangular
pan. They are baked and then cut into squares. Most drop
cookie recipes can be converted to this type of cookie.
Example: Brownies, cereal bar.
Sandwich cookies - are rolled or pressed cookies that
are assembled as a sandwich with a sweet filling.
Fillings may be with marshmallow, jam, or icing.
Example: Oreo cookies made of two chocolate cookies
with a vanilla icing filling.
• MOLDED COOKIES - are made from stiff dough that is
molded into balls or cookie shapes by hand before
baking.
Example: Snicker doodles
PRESSED COOKIES - are made from a
soft dough that is extruded from a cookie
press into various decorative shapes before
baking.
Example : Spritzgebäck
..
Creaming
Cookies need sufficient creaming so that the sugar, shortening, and other
ingredients are mixed well. Eggs are gradually added and creamed well after
each addition.
Mixing
Lightly mix the flour to prevent over mixing. Over mixing makes the cookie
dough tough.
Blending
It is used to mix shortening, sugar, and liquid for better formation of the dough
and absorption of the flour.
Rolling
The dough for refrigerated cookies is rolled to flatten and to make the dough
smooth before cutting.
Methods in mixing cookies
• Sift the flour with other dry ingredients.
• Cream the butter, then add the sweeteners, liquids,
and the sifted ingredients. The final addition should be
any nuts or fruits or chips like chocolate.
• Mix lightly. Over mixing can result in dough that is too
moist and will create overly flat, totally spread out
cookies.
• Avoid baking sheets that are too thin as they
encourage quick browning on the bottom of the
cookies and can make an uneven texture.
Techniques
Consider using parchment paper instead of greasing
the pan to avoid the extra fat.
Rethink how you shape your cookies. Drop cookies will
spread, however, a deep spoon, a melon baller or a
small ice cream scoop will give you high, round pieces
of dough that tend to spread less.
Make sure your oven is calibrated to the right
temperature. Check it with an oven thermometer, and
pre-heat the oven if directed by the recipe.
Bake the cookies just under the recommended time. That
way, the centers remain soft but baked through and the edges
are a beautiful golden color.
Re-using cookie sheets to make extra batches, let them cool
down considerably. A hot pan will start spreading the dough
even before you bake the cookies because the heat is melting
the fat. If you cannot wait between batches, invest in two or
more pans.
Allow cookies to cool on the pan up to five minutes before
transferring to a cooking rack. Transferring them too earlier
encourages crispness
Use good tools and utensils.
Assemble all the bowls, pans, and utensils you will need on your counter or
worktable before starting. Use standard measuring cups and spoons.
Use correct pan sizes.
Use the type of pan specified in the recipe. Recipes are carefully calculated
as to yield and changing the pan size also alters the baking temperature and
time. Larger, shallower pans need increased heat; smaller, deeper pans need
decreased heat. The size of a baking pan or dish is measured across the top
of the container from the inside edge to inside edge. The depth also is
measured on the inside of the pan or dish from the bottom to the top of the
rim. Prepare the pan carefully according to the recipe. Place pans as near the
center of the oven as possible. Do not place pans directly over another and
do not crowd the oven (this makes for uneven baking).
Use top-quality ingredient and assemble the ingredients before
starting. You can't expect a first-rate product using second-rate
ingredients. Be sure your ingredients are fresh and of the finest
quality. If your recipe says the ingredient must be room
temperature, be sure it is room temperature before proceeding.
Baking Powder and Baking Soda: Check expiration dates of
Baking Powder and baking soda, replacing if necessary. For testing
purposes, baking soda should bubble when added to vinegar and
baking powder should bubble when added to hot water. Be sure to
mix baking powder and/or baking soda into the flour before adding to
the wet ingredients; this distributes everything evenly so your cookies
won't end up with large holes.
Eggs:
Check your "use-by" date on your egg carton. Check out
Sell Date of Eggs (Sell Date of Eggs - Date Codes on
Egg Cartons).
Flour:
Don't substitute flour types. If your recipe calls for all-
purpose flour, that's what you need to use. Cake flour
and bread flour will not behave the same. Learn about
the different types of flour. When a recipe calls for all-
purpose flour, it means the bleached variety.
Nuts:
Smell and taste nuts before using. Oils in nuts can turn rancid quickly. Store any
leftover nuts in the freezer for longest shelf life.
Butter:
Cookies often require softened butter (65 to 67 degrees F.) or room temperature
butter. Softened butter creams easily and is more easily incorporated into the dough
than cold butter. The additional mixing necessary to incorporate cold butter may
adversely affect the dough and the texture of the baked cookies.
How to judge when butter is properly softened:
The butter should blend with little resistance and without cracking or breaking.
The butter should give slightly when pressed but still hold it shape.
Shortening:
Check shortening before using. Shortening, especially new trans fat-free brands) can
go bad, introducing off-flavors to your cookies that you worked hard making.
Sugar:
The type of sugar your use in your cookies can promote spread in baked
cookies. To understand this, you need to know that sugar is a tenderizer
which interferes with the formation of structure. Sugars with a finer
granulation promote more spread (probably because they dissolve sooner
and only dissolved sugars tenderize). Powdered sugar (confectioner's
sugar), when it contains cornstarch, prevents spread in cookies despite its
finer grind.
Measure the quantities correctly.
This is a baking must. One common cause of cooking failures is inaccurate
measurement of ingredients. You can use the best ingredients in the
world, but if you do not measure correctly, the recipe will not come out
properly. Also always use level measurements (all measurements in a recipe
Measuring Liquids:
Use a glass or plastic measuring cup. The glass or plastic permits
you to see the level of the liquid being measured. The cup for
liquids should have additional space above the one-cup line, so
that a full cup can be accurately measured without spilling. To get
an accurate reading in a liquid measuring cup, set the cup on a
level surface and bend down to check the measurement at eye
level.
Oven temperature:
Preheat the oven 10 to 15 minutes before you begin baking
cookies. These is usually consistent unless a recipe specifically
calls for you to start with a cold oven.
Cookies can be baked best on a baking sheet
because it is open on three sides and the circulation of
heat is more even. There should be at least inch
between the baking sheet and the sides of the oven.
Bake cookies on the top shelf of the oven, so that it
browns evenly on both sides without burning on the
bottom. Cookies rich in sugar are baked at lower oven
temperature than those which are rich in fat but less in
sugar content.
Baking the cookies
Making the dough is pretty consistent with all cookies.
Mix your dry ingredients in a medium-sized bowl. In a
large bowl, cream your butters and sugars, then add
your slightly beaten eggs and vanilla. To this
mixture, slowly add the dry ingredients until well mixed.
Usually at this point the extra flavorings are added to
the dough. Then the dough is prepared the way
dictated by the cookie type.
Cooling the cookies
When baked, cookies should be removed carefully from
the baking sheet at once with a flat knife or spatula on a
wire to cool.
Storage of cookies
After loosening carefully the cookies and removing them
from the baking sheets, they are kept in a covered
container, such as cookie jars. They may be frozen.
Frozen cookies are thawed at room temperature or a
baking sheet for three to five minutes.
Cooling and storage of cookies
CRITERIA 5 4 3 2 1
Presentation: (20pts.)
 Appearance
 Creativity
 Originality
 Resourcefulness
 Quality
Following Direction: (20pts.)
 Achieve the given directions
 Attain quality of output
 Minimum errors and conflicts
 Proper Use of Tools
Cleanliness and Orderliness: (10 pts.)
 Self-Initiative
 Care for the tools and equipment
 Maintain cleanliness
 Concern with the surroundings
 Awareness in sanitation
Skills Development: (10 pts.)
 Develop self-esteem
 Achieve efficiency
 Attain proficiency
 Integrate skills and ability
 Accomplish with necessary modifications
 Show and acquire talents
Legend: 5 – Excellent 4 – Very satisfactory 3 – Satisfactory 2 – Fair 1 – Needs
improvement
Baking cookies
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Baking cookies

  • 2. 1. Define and enumerate the ingredients, tools, and equipment needed in baking different kinds of cookies. 2. Identify the different kinds of cookies and their characteristics. 3. Demonstrate the procedures that should be followed in baking cookies. 4. Prepare a score card for judging baked cookies. 5. Express delight and satisfaction for being able to bake cookies. Objectives:
  • 5. Cookies - are little cakes, flat, small and sweet. Some cookies are light and other are dark. Some are decked with fruits or nuts and others trimmed with frostings and decorations. Cookies are popular. They go well with any occasion. They go a long way and can be prepared at leisure and can be stored for busy days. What is a cookies?
  • 6. In the United States and Canada, a cookie is a small, flat-baked round delicacy, containing milk, flour, eggs, and sugar. In most English-speaking countries outside North America, the most common word for this is biscuit; in many regions both terms are used, while in others the two words have different meanings—a cookie is a plain bun in Scotland, while in the United States a biscuit is a kind of quick bread similar to a scone.
  • 7. In the United Kingdom the term cookie often just refers to chocolate chip cookies or a variation (e.g. cookies containing oats, Smarties). A basic biscuit recipe includes flour, shortening (often lard), baking powder or soda, milk (buttermilk or sweet milk) and sugar. Common savory variations involve substituting sugar with an ingredient such as cheese or other dairy products. Shortbread is a popular biscuit in the UK.
  • 9. The dry ingredients consist of all-purpose flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. The sweetness comes from granulated and/or brown sugar. The fat is either softened butter or margarine and sometimes shortening. Eggs and vanilla extract are also used. For different flavored cookies you can add any or all of these: chocolate, cocoa, nuts, raisins, oatmeal, spices or extracts. INGREDIENTS
  • 10. Butter is a fat that adds an utterly delicious quality to all baked goods, including cookies. Too much butter, however, can lead to cookies that flatten and crisp when baked. Margarine can be used instead of butter but some low fat choices have a little more water which makes it a better choice for crispier cookies than chewy ones. Shortening can help the flour and eggs set before spreading yet offers little or no flavor. A third choice for fat is to combine shortening with the butter but we champion butter for its flavor. All about ingredients
  • 11. Sweeteners like brown sugar and honey. Help to retain moisture and provide a chewier texture. Too much sugar, however, will flatten the cookie because sugars liquefy under heat. Like mixing fats, mixing is a possible choice: consider a balance of honey or molasses with brown sugar.
  • 12. All-purpose or pastry flour Is best used for lighter cookies. For chewy chunky cookies use bread flour with its powerful gluten or cake flour which has absorbent starch; each can curb cookie spread. Egg yolks Create chewier cookies than whole eggs.
  • 13. DROP COOKIES - are made from soft dough which is dropped in a greased baking sheet with the use of a spoon. Examples: Chocolate chip cookies, peanut butter cookies, and oatmeal (or oatmeal raisin) cookies are popular examples of drop cookies. * ROLLED COOKIES - are made from stiff dough but soft enough to be handled and cut into shapes with a cookie cutter. Example: Gingerbread men kinds of Cookies
  • 14. SHEET OR BAR COOKIES - are made from batter similar to the consistency of sponge cake or butter cake. In British English, bar cookies are known as "tray bakes.“ Consist of batter, cheese, or other ingredients that are poured or pressed into a pan and cut into cookie-sized pieces after baking. It is prepared by putting the dough in a rectangular pan. They are baked and then cut into squares. Most drop cookie recipes can be converted to this type of cookie. Example: Brownies, cereal bar.
  • 15. Sandwich cookies - are rolled or pressed cookies that are assembled as a sandwich with a sweet filling. Fillings may be with marshmallow, jam, or icing. Example: Oreo cookies made of two chocolate cookies with a vanilla icing filling. • MOLDED COOKIES - are made from stiff dough that is molded into balls or cookie shapes by hand before baking. Example: Snicker doodles
  • 16. PRESSED COOKIES - are made from a soft dough that is extruded from a cookie press into various decorative shapes before baking. Example : Spritzgebäck ..
  • 17. Creaming Cookies need sufficient creaming so that the sugar, shortening, and other ingredients are mixed well. Eggs are gradually added and creamed well after each addition. Mixing Lightly mix the flour to prevent over mixing. Over mixing makes the cookie dough tough. Blending It is used to mix shortening, sugar, and liquid for better formation of the dough and absorption of the flour. Rolling The dough for refrigerated cookies is rolled to flatten and to make the dough smooth before cutting. Methods in mixing cookies
  • 18. • Sift the flour with other dry ingredients. • Cream the butter, then add the sweeteners, liquids, and the sifted ingredients. The final addition should be any nuts or fruits or chips like chocolate. • Mix lightly. Over mixing can result in dough that is too moist and will create overly flat, totally spread out cookies. • Avoid baking sheets that are too thin as they encourage quick browning on the bottom of the cookies and can make an uneven texture. Techniques
  • 19. Consider using parchment paper instead of greasing the pan to avoid the extra fat. Rethink how you shape your cookies. Drop cookies will spread, however, a deep spoon, a melon baller or a small ice cream scoop will give you high, round pieces of dough that tend to spread less. Make sure your oven is calibrated to the right temperature. Check it with an oven thermometer, and pre-heat the oven if directed by the recipe.
  • 20. Bake the cookies just under the recommended time. That way, the centers remain soft but baked through and the edges are a beautiful golden color. Re-using cookie sheets to make extra batches, let them cool down considerably. A hot pan will start spreading the dough even before you bake the cookies because the heat is melting the fat. If you cannot wait between batches, invest in two or more pans. Allow cookies to cool on the pan up to five minutes before transferring to a cooking rack. Transferring them too earlier encourages crispness
  • 21. Use good tools and utensils. Assemble all the bowls, pans, and utensils you will need on your counter or worktable before starting. Use standard measuring cups and spoons. Use correct pan sizes. Use the type of pan specified in the recipe. Recipes are carefully calculated as to yield and changing the pan size also alters the baking temperature and time. Larger, shallower pans need increased heat; smaller, deeper pans need decreased heat. The size of a baking pan or dish is measured across the top of the container from the inside edge to inside edge. The depth also is measured on the inside of the pan or dish from the bottom to the top of the rim. Prepare the pan carefully according to the recipe. Place pans as near the center of the oven as possible. Do not place pans directly over another and do not crowd the oven (this makes for uneven baking).
  • 22. Use top-quality ingredient and assemble the ingredients before starting. You can't expect a first-rate product using second-rate ingredients. Be sure your ingredients are fresh and of the finest quality. If your recipe says the ingredient must be room temperature, be sure it is room temperature before proceeding. Baking Powder and Baking Soda: Check expiration dates of Baking Powder and baking soda, replacing if necessary. For testing purposes, baking soda should bubble when added to vinegar and baking powder should bubble when added to hot water. Be sure to mix baking powder and/or baking soda into the flour before adding to the wet ingredients; this distributes everything evenly so your cookies won't end up with large holes.
  • 23. Eggs: Check your "use-by" date on your egg carton. Check out Sell Date of Eggs (Sell Date of Eggs - Date Codes on Egg Cartons). Flour: Don't substitute flour types. If your recipe calls for all- purpose flour, that's what you need to use. Cake flour and bread flour will not behave the same. Learn about the different types of flour. When a recipe calls for all- purpose flour, it means the bleached variety.
  • 24. Nuts: Smell and taste nuts before using. Oils in nuts can turn rancid quickly. Store any leftover nuts in the freezer for longest shelf life. Butter: Cookies often require softened butter (65 to 67 degrees F.) or room temperature butter. Softened butter creams easily and is more easily incorporated into the dough than cold butter. The additional mixing necessary to incorporate cold butter may adversely affect the dough and the texture of the baked cookies. How to judge when butter is properly softened: The butter should blend with little resistance and without cracking or breaking. The butter should give slightly when pressed but still hold it shape. Shortening: Check shortening before using. Shortening, especially new trans fat-free brands) can go bad, introducing off-flavors to your cookies that you worked hard making.
  • 25. Sugar: The type of sugar your use in your cookies can promote spread in baked cookies. To understand this, you need to know that sugar is a tenderizer which interferes with the formation of structure. Sugars with a finer granulation promote more spread (probably because they dissolve sooner and only dissolved sugars tenderize). Powdered sugar (confectioner's sugar), when it contains cornstarch, prevents spread in cookies despite its finer grind. Measure the quantities correctly. This is a baking must. One common cause of cooking failures is inaccurate measurement of ingredients. You can use the best ingredients in the world, but if you do not measure correctly, the recipe will not come out properly. Also always use level measurements (all measurements in a recipe
  • 26. Measuring Liquids: Use a glass or plastic measuring cup. The glass or plastic permits you to see the level of the liquid being measured. The cup for liquids should have additional space above the one-cup line, so that a full cup can be accurately measured without spilling. To get an accurate reading in a liquid measuring cup, set the cup on a level surface and bend down to check the measurement at eye level. Oven temperature: Preheat the oven 10 to 15 minutes before you begin baking cookies. These is usually consistent unless a recipe specifically calls for you to start with a cold oven.
  • 27. Cookies can be baked best on a baking sheet because it is open on three sides and the circulation of heat is more even. There should be at least inch between the baking sheet and the sides of the oven. Bake cookies on the top shelf of the oven, so that it browns evenly on both sides without burning on the bottom. Cookies rich in sugar are baked at lower oven temperature than those which are rich in fat but less in sugar content. Baking the cookies
  • 28. Making the dough is pretty consistent with all cookies. Mix your dry ingredients in a medium-sized bowl. In a large bowl, cream your butters and sugars, then add your slightly beaten eggs and vanilla. To this mixture, slowly add the dry ingredients until well mixed. Usually at this point the extra flavorings are added to the dough. Then the dough is prepared the way dictated by the cookie type.
  • 29. Cooling the cookies When baked, cookies should be removed carefully from the baking sheet at once with a flat knife or spatula on a wire to cool. Storage of cookies After loosening carefully the cookies and removing them from the baking sheets, they are kept in a covered container, such as cookie jars. They may be frozen. Frozen cookies are thawed at room temperature or a baking sheet for three to five minutes. Cooling and storage of cookies
  • 30. CRITERIA 5 4 3 2 1 Presentation: (20pts.)  Appearance  Creativity  Originality  Resourcefulness  Quality Following Direction: (20pts.)  Achieve the given directions  Attain quality of output  Minimum errors and conflicts  Proper Use of Tools Cleanliness and Orderliness: (10 pts.)  Self-Initiative  Care for the tools and equipment  Maintain cleanliness  Concern with the surroundings  Awareness in sanitation Skills Development: (10 pts.)  Develop self-esteem  Achieve efficiency  Attain proficiency  Integrate skills and ability  Accomplish with necessary modifications  Show and acquire talents Legend: 5 – Excellent 4 – Very satisfactory 3 – Satisfactory 2 – Fair 1 – Needs improvement