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Online learning innovation for higher education

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This keynote at the International Forum for Partnerships on the Qingdao Declaration, Qingdao, China, discusses new policies for online, open and flexible learning in relation to the new Sustainable Development Goal 4: Education 2030. A simple foresight for Education 2030 post secondary education is presented. Three principles for implementing Education 2030 (megapolicies: Innovation, Openness and Collaboration ) are illustrated with actual cases.

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Online learning innovation for higher education

  1. 1. Online learning innovation for higher education International Forum for Partnerships on the Qingdao Declaration, Qingdao, 20 – 21 December 2015 Gard Titlestad, Secretary General International Council for Open and Distance Education
  2. 2. • To be the leading global network for making quality learning accessible throughout the world using online, open, distance and flexible education. • To connect institutions, organisations and professionals from across the globe so that they can share ideas, resources and best practices, partner on major projects and advocate together. • To be the official partner of UNESCO, that shares that agency’s key aim inclusive and equitable quality education and lifelong learning for all. • ICDE believes that in pursuing education as a universal right, the needs of the learner must be central. • To organize members in all regions of the world – global balance. Support From Norway 25 years Why is ICDE here? UNESCO Partner 50 years Platinum open access
  3. 3. ONLINE, OPEN, FLEXIBLE AND TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED HIGHER EDUCATION ICDE Focus
  4. 4. ”TOWARDS INCLUSIVE AND EQUITABLE QUALITY EDUCATION AND LIFELONG LEARNING FOR ALL” SEIZE DIGITAL OPPORTUNITIES, LEAD EDUCATION TRANSFORMATION Sustainable Development Goal 4 Education 2030
  5. 5. Target 3, point 43.: A well-established, properly-regulated tertiary education system supported by technology, Open Educational Resources (OERs) and distance education modalities can increase access, equity, quality and relevance, and narrow the gap between what is taught at tertiary education institutions and what economies and societies demand. The provision of tertiary education should be progressively free, in line with existing international agreements. Framework for Action Education 2030: November 2015
  6. 6. Policy fora, influencing the future: 20 November 2014: Open Education Key issues in policy for governments and senior management in higher education ICDE High Level Policy Forum 17 October 2015: “Higher education for the sustainable future we want. The way ahead for Online, Open and Flexible learning: Opportunities and Actions.” In partership with UNESCO, CoL and OEC Interventions, from UNESCO, ICDE and key experts and senior management: The Bali Message Global High Level Forum in Paris 9 – 11 JUNE 2015: Online, open and flexible higher education for the future we want UNESCO – in partnership with ICDE
  7. 7. The Paris Message: http://icde.org/en/.b7C_wRzGYG.ips
  8. 8. The way forward Dr. Bakary Diallo, Rector for African Virtual University: said in his concluding remarks for the Forum that higher education should not be exclusive for the few, and he suggested four keywords for the way ahead: “Communication, Implementation, Collaboration (sharing) and Monitoring the progress.” Pretoria, 17 October 2015
  9. 9. ec.europa.eu/research/pdf/publications/knowledge_future_2050.pdf December 2015
  10. 10. ICDE ad hoc observations, trends and analysis + + Simplified version An Education 2030 foresight
  11. 11. 2015 2030+2030 Education 2030 Globalisation Demography Technology Megatrends SDG4 Education 2030 Incheon-declaration Qingdao-declaration Paris-message Option A: The world´s Success Option B: The world misses out
  12. 12. • Option A: The world´s Success • Competitive regions –clusters of HEI flourishing. • Education is ‘in’. New efficiencies: course modules shared within university clusters, online and artificial intelligence-based teaching, specialisation within institutions public and private. • Educational games, at which regional designers excel, are a vast market segment. • In business, open innovation is now the dominant mode. The Globe´s mega-cities, are a focus for innovation; ‘Paris original’ – or Qingdao or Nairobi are global brands. • Automation and data-intensive science have changed the nature of doing research. We have moved from open science to radical open access: all kinds of new actors are rushing into the research game, especially in astronomy, ecology, climate and other fields that attract strong public interest. Regions are competing in taking the lead in producing the world’s ideas, creativity is flourishing. • So are also industries anchored in regions, often building on healthy SMEs. The region´s universities are strong, its citizens fulfilled – and its core values, such as equality, openness, social inclusion and environmental responsibility, are upheld. • Option B: The world misses out • The Globe is a victim of megatrends beyond its control. Automation and globalisation have triggered mass unemployment, social exclusion, discontent. • What’s left for the humans to do? Inequality is higher than ever; new creative jobs are constantly evolving from new technologies, but they are only for the skilled few. • Politically, regions have fragmented into a coalition of rich and poor sub-regions with minimal coordination. Multinational companies, and wealthy individuals, use global markets and digital technologies to avoid tax. • A few great universities dominate; many weaker, regional universities have closed or merged. Automation has also swept across the educational system, with online certifications normal and augmented cognition technologies starting to appear – and finding favour with big companies wanting fast, cheap graduates. • Top cited scientists are in hot demand – often hired by multinationals in a kind of perpetual ‘consultancy without borders. Mobility is diminished. Innovation is without borders; supply chains form and dissemble rapidly – making long-term regional development more difficult than ever. • Regions look inward, fear the future, and see their values gradually discredited.
  13. 13. • Option A: The world´s Success • Competitive regions –clusters of HEI flourishing. • Education is ‘in’. New efficiencies: course modules shared within university clusters, online and artificial intelligence-based teaching, specialisation within institutions public and private. • Educational games, at which regional designers excel, are a vast market segment. • In business, open innovation is now the dominant mode. The Globe´s mega-cities, are a focus for innovation; ‘Paris original’ – or Qingdao or Nairobi are global brands. • Automation and data-intensive science have changed the nature of doing research. We have moved from open science to radical open access: all kinds of new actors are rushing into the research game, especially in astronomy, ecology, climate and other fields that attract strong public interest. Regions are competing in taking the lead in producing the world’s ideas, creativity is flourishing. • So are also industries anchored in regions, often building on healthy SMEs. The region´s universities are strong, its citizens fulfilled – and its core values, such as equality, openness, social inclusion and environmental responsibility, are upheld. • Option B: The world misses out • The Globe is a victim of megatrends beyond its control. Automation and globalisation have triggered mass unemployment, social exclusion, discontent. • What’s left for the humans to do? Inequality is higher than ever; new creative jobs are constantly evolving from new technologies, but they are only for the skilled few. • Politically, regions have fragmented into a coalition of rich and poor sub-regions with minimal coordination. Multinational companies, and wealthy individuals, use global markets and digital technologies to avoid tax. • A few great universities dominate; many weaker, regional universities have closed or merged. Automation has also swept across the educational system, with online certifications normal and augmented cognition technologies starting to appear – and finding favour with big companies wanting fast, cheap graduates. • Top cited scientists are in hot demand – often hired by multinationals in a kind of perpetual ‘consultancy without borders. Mobility is diminished. Innovation is without borders; supply chains form and dissemble rapidly – making long-term regional development more difficult than ever. • Regions look inward, fear the future, and see their values gradually discredited. • Flourishing regions – a much more balanced world • Education core value from cradle to grave • Open innovation – Smart cities leading developments • Automation for human expansion and a sustainable world • Regional creative knowledge clusters • Equality, openness, social inclusion and environmental responsibility • The Globe victim for megatrends beyond human control. Automation triggered massive discontent. • Inequality, creative jobs for the few • Coalitions of rich and poor. Low regional coordination • A few universities dominate. Online has become the way to satisfy big companies need for cheap graduates • Innovation without borders – regional growth disintegrate • Regions fear the future
  14. 14. Option A: The world´s Success 2015 2030+2030 Globalisation Demography Technology Education 2030 Megatrends Option B: The world misses out SDG4 Education 2030 Incheon-declaration Qingdao-declaration Paris-message Openess Collaboration Flexibility and innovation Megapolicies
  15. 15. Innovation
  16. 16. Opening up
  17. 17. http://open.bccampus.ca Check the texbooks!
  18. 18. More BC Open Textbook Stats As of December 4, 2015 General Stats Student Savings $985,700- 1,214,092 Number of participating institutions 24 (19 Public, 5 Private) Number of students affected 9,857 Number of textbooks on open 137 http://open.bccampus.ca/2015/09/10/more-bc-open-textbook-stats/ http://open.bccampus.ca/about-2/ http://open.bccampus.ca
  19. 19. https://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/11/10/major-study-finds-oer-students-do-just-as-well-or-better.aspx
  20. 20. A student in France can use collaborative free quality assured educational material for her grades, e.g. bachelor and master within the educational system, all made possible and digitalized by collaborative thematic universities in a connected French educational system.
  21. 21. OER and Online, Open and Flexible Learning can increase the impact of investments in knowledge OER & OOF Open Access – open science Research based OER Research based teaching Innovation in education – open innovation Innovate the learning system – flip the classroom Knowledge supply for innovation High quality education Research based education Resource based education Open education
  22. 22. Collaboration
  23. 23. A shift to a culture for collaboration • Connectivity and openness as enablers: – Collaborative on content – Collaborative on learning methods – Collaborative among students and teachers – Collaborative among partner institutions – Collaborative among HEIs, TVETs and employers – Collaborative within regions – Collaborative among stakeholders for increased impact, Sustainable Development Goal 4 Education 2030 • Creating the future collaborative educational landscape for learner success.
  24. 24. ”TOWARDS INCLUSIVE AND EQUITABLE QUALITY EDUCATION AND LIFELONG LEARNING FOR ALL” Sustainable Development Goal 4: Education 2030 THANK YOU titlestad@icde.org www.icde.org Seize digital opportunities, lead education transformation

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