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UML and B in Industrial Development

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Dagstuhl Seminar 06191
May 7-12, 2006
ABSTRACT

We have used both UML and B for the developed of a novel, service-based mobile
phone architecture/platform called NoTA (Network on Terminal Architecture)

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UML and B in Industrial Development

  1. 1. UML and B in Industrial Development Ian Oliver Nokia Research Center It¨amerenkatu 11-13 Helsinki, Finland ian.oliver@nokia.com Dagstuhl Seminar 06191 May 7-12, 2006 ABSTRACT For better or worse, UML is the defacto ‘language’ for the description of ‘sys- tems’ - primarily, software based. UML has an extensible semantics to cater for differing domains and abstraction levels. Therein lies various problems related to the semantics of the language and their rigour. It must be understood that UML is not a process or method and does no imply or infer one. It is a language for the expression of systems using object oriented concepts. We have used both UML and B for the developed of a novel, service-based mobile phone architecture/platform called NoTA (Network on Terminal Architecture) Requires are partitioned into various types: tests, domain concepts, implemen- tation constraints, architectural constraints and properties (invariants). An initial model is created using classes to examine the concepts of the domain more throughly. This is then analysed using a translation to B. Tests on this models are encoded in CSP. A process of partitioned or architecting takes place into layered or component architectures. We can then focus on certain aspects or components and subject this to a more formal specification and analysis. A traditional refinement (and sometimes retrenchment) process then follows. The results is that we can integrate formal methods into existing industrial approaches without too much pain, and of course in an acceptable manner to industrial sceptics. 1

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