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The Suffragists . Lecture by Helen Grundy
What is a Pressure group? <ul><li>When a group of people want a reform or change in the law they can form a pressure group...
Who were the Suffragists? <ul><li>The Suffrage Movement was a pressure group which used peaceful means of persuasion. </li...
<ul><li>Mostly the men and women of the Suffrage Movement were middle class. They had the time and money to spend on the c...
Suffragists  - National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies. Established 1897 by Millicent Fawcett. Methods Peaceful prote...
<ul><li>Processions </li></ul><ul><li>February 1907, 3,000 suffragists campaigners marched in London. Known as the ‘mud ma...
<ul><li>Large membership </li></ul><ul><li>1909 13,000 members </li></ul><ul><li>1913 100,000 members and 500 branches nat...
Historians views of the Suffragists Sandra Holten Argues pre-war campaigning was vital for women to get the vote. Sir Robe...
What did the Suffragists want? <ul><li>They believed in winning the vote for women using peaceful tactics not violence. </...
<ul><li>Suffragists held demonstrations. They were a good way to gain publicity as the events were covered by the press. <...
 
Did politicians support the Suffragists? <ul><li>Suffragists had to persuade MPs, without their support the law could not ...
<ul><li>Liberal MPs seemed to be the most likely to support female suffrage so a lot of effort was put into supporting can...
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The Suffragists

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The Suffragists

  1. 1. The Suffragists . Lecture by Helen Grundy
  2. 2. What is a Pressure group? <ul><li>When a group of people want a reform or change in the law they can form a pressure group. </li></ul><ul><li>This is different from a political party. A pressure group is usually focused on one particular issue, whereas a political party has to have policies on a range of issues, and aims to secure power by winning elections. </li></ul><ul><li>Pressure groups do not try to win elections. They hope to influence the public and the parties and win their support. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Who were the Suffragists? <ul><li>The Suffrage Movement was a pressure group which used peaceful means of persuasion. </li></ul><ul><li>Since the 1860’s groups of women had been campaigning for the right to vote. </li></ul><ul><li>Although women had made gains in areas such as education, real change could only come through having a say in Parliament. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Mostly the men and women of the Suffrage Movement were middle class. They had the time and money to spend on the campaign unlike working class supporters. </li></ul><ul><li>But in 1897 the National Union of Women’s Suffrage societies (NUWSS) was formed to bring the local organisations into one. </li></ul><ul><li>Members were called Suffragists and their leader was Mrs Millicent Fawcett. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Suffragists - National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies. Established 1897 by Millicent Fawcett. Methods Peaceful protest. <ul><li>Petitions to parliament </li></ul><ul><li>E.g. 1910 presented petition with 250,000 signatures in favour of female suffrage. </li></ul><ul><li>Propaganda </li></ul><ul><li>Newspaper ‘The Suffragist’. Leaflets etc. In 1913 spend £45,000 on publicity. </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Processions </li></ul><ul><li>February 1907, 3,000 suffragists campaigners marched in London. Known as the ‘mud march’ due to torrential rain. </li></ul><ul><li>1908 Massive pageant from Embankment to Albert Hall of 13,000 marchers. </li></ul><ul><li>Summer 1913 Women’s Pilgrimage. Held meetings over 6 weeks across the country. Finished with a march in Hyde Park on 26 th July with 50,000 people. </li></ul><ul><li>Worked with politicians </li></ul><ul><li>Up to 1910 Suffragists helped pro female suffrage Liberal candidates with their campaigns. </li></ul><ul><li>1910 Suffragists started to support their own candidates against Liberals. </li></ul><ul><li>1912 Suffragists started to support Labour candidates that were pro female suffrage. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Large membership </li></ul><ul><li>1909 13,000 members </li></ul><ul><li>1913 100,000 members and 500 branches nationwide. </li></ul><ul><li>Maintained support for peaceful respectful methods. Processions gained publicity. </li></ul><ul><li>Large membership and propaganda meant they had a wide influence across Britain. Benefits of male membership. </li></ul><ul><li>S. Holten argues pre war campaigning before the war was important for bringing women’s issues to the fore. </li></ul><ul><li>Peaceful methods easy to ignore. By 1905 the press had were virtually ignoring them. </li></ul><ul><li>Concentrated on a wide range of issues – not just female suffrage. </li></ul><ul><li>Lost essential political support from Liberals from 1910. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Historians views of the Suffragists Sandra Holten Argues pre-war campaigning was vital for women to get the vote. Sir Robert Ensor the propaganda of the suffragists “ effect was beyond question”.
  9. 9. What did the Suffragists want? <ul><li>They believed in winning the vote for women using peaceful tactics not violence. </li></ul><ul><li>They held meetings to generate publicity and recruit new members. </li></ul><ul><li>Guest speakers were invited to talk about issues concerning women. </li></ul><ul><li>Meetings were held in people’s houses or for larger public meetings, in places like Trafalgar Square. </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Suffragists held demonstrations. They were a good way to gain publicity as the events were covered by the press. </li></ul><ul><li>Suffragists dressed in in the colours of the Suffrage movement. Purple for dignity and green for hope. </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrators also dressed up in the costumes of famous women in working clothes or in national costumes, to show women’s achievements. </li></ul><ul><li>Banners showing portraits of the leaders are carried, and bands play protest songs to keep spirits high and attract attention. </li></ul>
  11. 12. Did politicians support the Suffragists? <ul><li>Suffragists had to persuade MPs, without their support the law could not be changed. Petitions were sent to Parliament. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1887, seventy one MPs formed a committee in support of the Suffragists cause. </li></ul><ul><li>The work of the committee and the NUWSS partly paid off. Almost every year a proposal had gone before Parliament to allow female suffrage. They were all rejected. </li></ul>
  12. 13. <ul><li>Liberal MPs seemed to be the most likely to support female suffrage so a lot of effort was put into supporting candidates who were sympathetic to the Suffragists. </li></ul><ul><li>The Liberal government was unwilling to commit itself to female suffrage, so in 1912 the Suffragists changed their allegiance to the Labour Party. </li></ul><ul><li>Despite all of these efforts the franchise law was not extended to include women. </li></ul><ul><li>The Suffragists believed their movement was like a glacier – it might be slow moving but it was a powerful and unstoppable force. </li></ul><ul><li>By the end of the 19 th century there were about 400 NUWSS branches all over Britain. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1910 membership had grown to 21,000 and by 1914 it was 53,000. </li></ul>

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