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specialized format and how are AIM selected

specialized format and how are AIM selected

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Accessible Instructional Materials or AIM are materials that are designed or converted in a way that makes them usable across the widest range of student variability regardless of format. IDEA focuses on accessible formats of print materials. In relation to IDEA, the term refers t print instructional material that have been transformed into the specialized formats of Braille, large print, audio, or digital text. For some students, printed materials can be a barrier to participation and achievement in the general education curriculum.

Accessible Instructional Materials or AIM are materials that are designed or converted in a way that makes them usable across the widest range of student variability regardless of format. IDEA focuses on accessible formats of print materials. In relation to IDEA, the term refers t print instructional material that have been transformed into the specialized formats of Braille, large print, audio, or digital text. For some students, printed materials can be a barrier to participation and achievement in the general education curriculum.

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specialized format and how are AIM selected

  1. 1. Prepared by: Glydelle E. Cataluña BEED-SPED 3A
  2. 2. Introduction:  Accessible Instructional Materials or AIM are materials that are designed or converted in a way that makes them usable across the widest range of student variability regardless of format. IDEA focuses on accessible formats of print materials. In relation to IDEA, the term refers t print instructional material that have been transformed into the specialized formats of Braille, large print, audio, or digital text. For some students, printed materials can be a barrier to participation and achievement in the general education curriculum.
  3. 3. Some questions a team may explore to determine if a student may not be able to make effective use of standard print-based materials  Can the student see the material well enough to read the information?  Can the student physically manipulate the material without undue effort?  Does the student have the necessary physical stamina to read for extended periods of time?  Can the student decode letters and words at or near grade level?  Can the student read with fluency at or near grade level?
  4. 4. Is there a general indicator that a student could use or learn to use a specialized format effectively?  A primary indicator would be that the student understands the content of print materials when the information is presented in another format. For example, when printed material is read aloud to the student, the student understands the content and can use the information.
  5. 5. What are some of the benefits of providing curriculum materials in a digital format?  Digital formats are listed below:  Text-to-speech decoding and comprehension support.  On-demand reading aloud of typed responses for editing.  Options to customize text font size and page layout.  Multimedia glossary to provide vocabulary support.  Learning supports and stud skill supports built- in.
  6. 6. What if the team knows that the student already uses one or more specialized formats?  If specialized formats are currently being used by the student, the team can indicate that the student needs one or more specialized formats and can justify the decision by noting a continuing need for the specialized formats currently provided to the student. As the team proceeds, there will be opportunities to consider whether currently used formats are sufficient or if additional or different formats are needed.
  7. 7. What is the difference between a specialized format and an alternative format?  Specialized Format  Includes exactly the same content as the print material. The specialized format does not change the content, only the way in which the content is presented to the student. The specialized format neither adds nor change any information.  Alternative format  May address the same goals, but the content of the material is modified or changed in some way so that I can be understood by the student.
  8. 8. Sources of information  Trials with materials in specialized formats using the same content and trials using the alternative materials  Reading diagnostic information  Informal observations by teachers and parents  Formal measures conducted by a psychologist, psychological associate, or educational diagnostician  Outside evaluations or reports from a doctor or other medical or educational professional(s)  Determination by the IEP team that the student requires alternative state-wide or district-wide assessments  Determination by the IEP team that the student requires an alternative educational curriculum
  9. 9. How are AIM selected?  The selection process includes the following checkpoints: 1. List the print materials that are used across the curriculum 2. Consider the instructional context in which they are used 3. Select which formats the students needs 4. Determine which materials are needed in the selected formats
  10. 10. 1. List the print materials that are used across the curriculum  The team gathers information about the print instructional materials used across the curriculum in which their student will participate and makes a list.
  11. 11. 2. Consider the instructional context in which they are used  The team considers their student’s skills, needs, and preferences; the environments in which the student will be working; and the tasks for which specialized formats will be needed.
  12. 12. 3. Select which formats the student needs  The team determines which specialized formats will be most useful for their students. They select the format needed by this student based on matching the students needs and the instructional context needs with the features that can be manipulated in the specialized formats. More than one may be needed and selected.
  13. 13. 4. Determine which materials are needed in the selected formats  The team uses the information gathered to select which print instructional materials are needed in which formats.
  14. 14. Frequently Asked Questions  What are print materials?  IDEA defines “print instructional materials” as printed “textbooks and related printed core materials that are written and published primarily for use in elementary and secondary school instruction and are required by a state education agency or local education agency for use by students in a classroom” (IDEA [674(e)(3)(C)]).
  15. 15.  What is meant by the term “related printed core materials”?  As stated above, these materials are “written and published primarily for use in elementary and secondary school instruction and are required by a state education agency or local education agency for use by students in a classroom” (IDEA [674(e)(3)(C)]). They are generally thought to be materials that are published and packaged as accompaniments to a textbook and included in a contract with a publisher.
  16. 16.  What are some examples of print instructional materials that might be listed in this section?  Textbooks and related printed core materials that are used in each of the student’s classes should be listed by title and publisher. It is also very helpful to have the ISBN, as that will be needed to search for the material in the formats needed by the student.
  17. 17.  What would not be considered a textbook or related printed core instructional material?  Books and other materials published for public consumption such as trade books, magazines, and newspapers are not considered instructional materials under the definition included in IDEA.
  18. 18.  Are news magazines and other periodicals which are produced by a publisher for elementary and secondary education and required by an SEA or LEA for use in a classroom considered related printed core instructional materials?  Yes, if, as part of the curriculum, the state education agency (SEA) or local education agency (LEA) requires the use of such materials which are published primarily for use in elementary and secondary school instruction, they would be considered part of related printed core instructional materials.
  19. 19.  If a school district’s foreign language classes use literature and other works published in other countries as a part of the core curriculum, are these works considered related printed core instructional materials? Does U.S copyright law apply to these works?  U.S. copyright law applies to works published in another country and used as part of the curriculum. However, unless these works are published primarily for use in education, they would not fall under the definition of related print instructional materials. While it would be an effective practice to provide such materials to the student, there is no requirement to do so in IDEA.
  20. 20.  Some of the published curricula used in school districts provide online instructional materials, games, exercises, and other materials. Must online resources for students be provided in accessible formats?  The mandate in IDEA to provide related core instructional materials in specialized formats only applies to materials which have a print- based source and are provided in the form of print on paper.
  21. 21.  If otherwise qualified students attend post- secondary classes at a community college or university as a part of their K-12 program, what is the school district’s responsibility to provide AIM for these curricula?  State educational agencies and local educational agencies have the responsibility under IDEA to provide specialized formats of print instructional materials to students served under the Act who need them in a timely manner. This responsibility would extend to all courses which the SEA and LEA offer for elementary or secondary school credit, even if they are provided by another entity through a contract or other arrangement. The SEA or LEA could, as a part of its contract with other entity, require that entity to provide specialized formats of materials to students who need them.
  22. 22.  Some publishers provide CDs with their textbooks. Are these CDs accessible?  Not all CDs are accessible; in fact, most CDs provided by publishers are locked and contain non-editable PDF files that are not accessible. It should be noted that the requirement to provide specialized formats to students with print disabilities included in IDEA only applies to printed materials.
  23. 23.  Can a CD that comes with a textbook for students be copied? What if there is one CD provided for the teacher and there are multiple students with print disabilities who need the text in a digital format?  U.S. copyright law applies to these materials. They cannot be freely reproduced. Teams should refer to the licensing agreement between the school district and the publisher to determine whether or not CDs can be copied. They can also request permission to copy directly from the publisher.
  24. 24. Instructional Context  Common student skills:  Cognitive skills:  Since specialized format are made up of exactly the same content as traditional print instructional materials presented in different ways, it is important to revisit a student’s ability to understand the content and gain information from presentation of the content.
  25. 25. Importance of the report  It is important because it provide accessible versions of instructional materials to students who are blind or otherwise unable to use printed materials. It afford the flexibility to meet the needs of a broad range of students, even those without disabilities. Thinking about the student, the team understand how materials are used so that the team can make a good decision about which specialized formats, or combination thereof will work for the student.
  26. 26. Recommendation  I recommend to use the accessible materials that are generally discussed in terms of four types of specialized formats: Braille, large-print, audio, and digital text. In selecting accessible instructional materials, you can visit the related sections of All About AIM. This section provides detailed information and resources related to the process of selecting accessible instructional materials to meet the needs of the student.

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