chesslhetsl23rd-200422233339.pptx

CHESS
Lesson 2
Pre-assessment
Identify each piece .
Answer:
Pre-assessment
Answer:
Chess Origins
• Chess, as we know it today, was born out of the Indian
game chaturanga before the 600s AD. The game spread throughout Asia
and Europe over the coming centuries, and eventually evolved into what we
know as chess around the 16th century.
Chess Origins
Brief History
19th century the
of chess sets
• In the mid
standardization
occurred.
• These same pieces were endorsed
by Howard Staunton, the strongest
player of his time.
• Also marked the introduction of
chess clocks to competitive play
Chess Origins
Brief History
Chess Origins
• Paul Charles Morphy (June 22, 1837 – July 10, 1884) was an American
chess player. He is considered to have been the greatest chess master
of his era and an unofficial World Chess Champion. ... Morphy was
born in New Orleans to a wealthy and distinguished family.
Brief History
Chess Origins
• Adolf Anderssen. Karl Ernst Adolf Anderssen (July 6, 1818 – March
13, 1879) was a German chess master.
• The world's leading chess player from 1851 to 1858, and leading
active player from 1860 to 1866; although the title of World Chess
Champion did not yet exist.
Brief History
Chess Origins
• 1886 – First official World Chess Championship match held between
Wilhelm Steinitz and. Steinitz wins decisively with the score 12½–7½
to become Johannes Zukertortme the first official world champion
• 1888 – First international correspondence tournament
Brief History
Wilhelm Steinitz
Johannes Zukertort
Chess Origins
• 1894 – Emmanuel Lasker defeats Wilhelm Steinitz in a world
championship match to become the second official world champion
Brief History
Chess Origins
• 1927 – First official Chess Olympiad in London
• 1927 – Alexander Alekhine defeats Capablanca at Buenos Aires with +6 −3 =25
and became the fourth official world champion
• José Raúl Capablanca y Graupera was a Cuban chess player who was world chess
champion from 1921 to 1927. A chess prodigy, he is considered by many one of
the greatest players of all time, widely renowned for his exceptional endgame
skill and speed of play.
Brief History
Alexander Alekhine José Raúl Capablanca y Graupera
Chess Origins
• 1927 – First official Chess Olympiad in London
• 1927 – Alexander Alekhine defeats Capablanca at Buenos Aires with +6 −3 =25
and became the fourth official world champion
• José Raúl Capablanca y Graupera was a Cuban chess player who was world chess
champion from 1921 to 1927. A chess prodigy, he is considered by many one of
the greatest players of all time, widely renowned for his exceptional endgame
skill and speed of play.
Brief History
Alexander Alekhine José Raúl Capablanca y Graupera
chesslhetsl23rd-200422233339.pptx
chesslhetsl23rd-200422233339.pptx
Benefits from Playing Chess
1.
Chess increases the mathematical and scientific skills of the students.
It also enhances the problem solving skills, concentration ability, as
well as logical thinking ability of the students
2
It develops a sense of confidence and self-worth of a
student.
3
It also increases communication skills of a student.
Benefits from Playing Chess
4.
It gives a lesson of hard work and commitment.
5.
Aside from intellectual exercise, chess provides entertainment and relaxation. This
game is free and can provide entertainment even for the observers.
.
Benefits from Playing Chess
6.Chess also has health benefits. It is
considered as a form of recreational
therapy. Chess keeps the mind healthy
and a healthy mind results in a healthy
body. It is used by therapists to help
people suffering from cognitive
functioning such as anxiety and
depression.
7. Chess as a form of indoor activity and
strengthen family relationship. Members
of the family can play with each other
while at home. In a way, the chess pieces
represent the family members. Each
member of the family has a role to play just
like in chess where each piece has specific
functions to perform to win the game.
Chess game goal
• The ultimate aim in the chess game is delivering a checkmate –
trapping your opponent´s king. The term checkmate is an alteration of
the Persian phrase “Shah Mat”, meaning literally, “the King is
ambushed”, and not “the King is dead”, that is a common
misconception.
General Chess Rules
• White is always first to move and players take turns alternately moving one
piece at a time. Movement is required. If a player´s turn is to move, he is not
in check but has no legal moves, this situation is called “Stalemate” and it
ends the game in a draw.
• Each type of piece has its own method of movement. A piece may be moved
to another position or may capture an opponent´s piece, replacing on its
square (en passant being the only exception). With the exception of the
knight, a piece may not move over or through any of the other pieces.
• Each type of piece has its own method of movement. A piece may be moved
to another position or may capture an opponent´s piece, replacing on its
square (en passant being the only exception). With the exception of the
knight, a piece may not move over or through any of the other pieces.
General Chess Rules
• When a king is threatened with capture (but can protect himself or escape),
it´s called check. If a king is in check, then the player must make a move that
eliminates the threat of capture and cannot leave the king in check.
• Checkmate happens when a king is placed in check and there is no legal
move to escape. Checkmate ends the game and the side whose king was
checkmated looses.
Here are the steps you need to follow in order to set up a chess board correctly:
Step 1: Make sure the board is in the correct position.
The chessboard is made up of
eight rows and eight columns
for a total of 64 squares of
alternating colors.
Step 2: The Rooks go in the corners.
Step 3: The Knights should always go next to the rooks.
Step 4: The Bishops go next to the knights.
Step 5: The Queen always goes to a square of her own color.
Step 6: The King goes on the last square remaining.
Step 7: Place all the eight pawns on the second and seventh ranks in
front of all the other pieces. There are eight pawns of each color in a
chess set.
CHESS PIECES AND HOW THEY MOVE
Pawn Chess Piece Moves
• Pawn chess pieces can only directly forward one square,
with two exceptions.
• Pawns can move directly forward two squares on their
first move only.
• Pawns can move diagonally forward when capturing an
opponent's chess piece.
• Once a pawn chess piece reaches the other side of the
chess board, the player may "trade" the pawn in for any
other chess piece if they choose, except another king.
Rook Chess Piece Moves
• Rook can move any number of vacant
squares vertically or horizontally. It also is
moved while castling.
Knight
Knight can move one square along any rank
or file and then at an angle. The knight´s
movement can also be viewed as an “L” or
“7″ laid out at any horizontal or vertical
angle.
Bishop
• Bishop can move any number of
vacant squares in any diagonal
direction.
Queen Chess Piece Moves
Queen can move any number of vacant squares
diagonally, horizontally, or vertically.
• cannot "jump" over any piece on the board,
so its movements are restricted to any
direction of unoccupied squares.
• can be used to capture any of your
opponent's pieces on the board.
King
King can move exactly one square
horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. At
most once in every game, each king is
allowed to make a special move, known as
castling.
How to do "en passant" in Chess
The last rule about pawns is called “en
passant,” which is French for “in
passing”. If a pawn moves out two squares
on its first move, and by doing so lands to
the side of an opponent's pawn (effectively
jumping past the other pawn's ability to
capture it), that other pawn has the option
of capturing the first pawn as it passes by.
How to Castle in Chess
In order to castle, the following conditions
must be met:
• it must be that king's very first move
• it must be that rook's very first move
• there cannot be any pieces between the
king and rook to move
• the king may not be in check or pass
through check
Pawn promotion
• If a pawn reaches the opponent´s edge of
the table, it will be promoted – the pawn
may be converted to a queen, rook,
bishop or knight, as the player desires.
The choice is not limited to previously
captured pieces.
CHECKMATE AND WHEN TO RESIGN
• Checkmate is when one player’s King is
threatened and there is no legal move to
meet the threat
• The player giving checkmate wins the
game
• A player can resign when their position is
hopeless. It is a loss, but it saves time and
shows they knew they lost.
The purpose of the game is to checkmate
the opponent's king. This happens when
the king is put into check and cannot get
out of check.
There are only three ways a king can get
out of check:
• move out of the way (though he cannot
castle!)
• block the check with another piece or
• capture the piece threatening the king.
EXAMPLE:
DIFFERENT WAYS TO DRAW THE GAME
• By agreement with your opponent
• Repeating the same position three (3) times, with
the same person to move and the same possible
moves
• Statements: The player to move has no legal
movies and is not in check
• The 50-Move Rule: 50 moves without a check or
piece being captured
ABOUT DRAWS
To request a draw:
• You must be the player to move
• You must be the player to move
• Make your move
• Offer a draw before touching the check. The offer
is considered on your time, not your opponent’s
time.
• If your opponent offers a draw, he often thinks he
is losing. Check what winning chances you have.
PERFORMANCE
1. Name each chess piece. 2. Set up the chess board
3. Demonstrate castling and
en passant capture.
4. Demonstrate how each
chess piece moves.
5. Explain the four rules in
castling.
6. Demonstrate on a chess board four ways
A chess game can end in a draw
Chess.com., History of Chess
Retrieved from: https://www.chess.com/article/view/history-of-chess
April 18, 2020
The chess world, Chess History Timeline
retrieved from:https://thechessworld.com/articles/general-information/chess-history-timeline-
6th-century- 2012/
April 18, 2020
I chess.net, Learn How to Set up a Chess Board with Our Step-By-Step Guide
retrieved from: https://www.ichess.net/blog/how-to-set-up-a-chessboard/
April 18, 2020
Wholesale Chess, CHESS PIECES AND HOW THEY MOVE
retrieved from: https://www.wholesalechess.com/pages/new-to-chess/pieces.html
April 18, 2020
References:
By:
Lolita M. Reynolds, LPT, MAED-GC
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chesslhetsl23rd-200422233339.pptx

  • 6. Chess Origins • Chess, as we know it today, was born out of the Indian game chaturanga before the 600s AD. The game spread throughout Asia and Europe over the coming centuries, and eventually evolved into what we know as chess around the 16th century.
  • 8. 19th century the of chess sets • In the mid standardization occurred. • These same pieces were endorsed by Howard Staunton, the strongest player of his time. • Also marked the introduction of chess clocks to competitive play Chess Origins Brief History
  • 9. Chess Origins • Paul Charles Morphy (June 22, 1837 – July 10, 1884) was an American chess player. He is considered to have been the greatest chess master of his era and an unofficial World Chess Champion. ... Morphy was born in New Orleans to a wealthy and distinguished family. Brief History
  • 10. Chess Origins • Adolf Anderssen. Karl Ernst Adolf Anderssen (July 6, 1818 – March 13, 1879) was a German chess master. • The world's leading chess player from 1851 to 1858, and leading active player from 1860 to 1866; although the title of World Chess Champion did not yet exist. Brief History
  • 11. Chess Origins • 1886 – First official World Chess Championship match held between Wilhelm Steinitz and. Steinitz wins decisively with the score 12½–7½ to become Johannes Zukertortme the first official world champion • 1888 – First international correspondence tournament Brief History Wilhelm Steinitz Johannes Zukertort
  • 12. Chess Origins • 1894 – Emmanuel Lasker defeats Wilhelm Steinitz in a world championship match to become the second official world champion Brief History
  • 13. Chess Origins • 1927 – First official Chess Olympiad in London • 1927 – Alexander Alekhine defeats Capablanca at Buenos Aires with +6 −3 =25 and became the fourth official world champion • José Raúl Capablanca y Graupera was a Cuban chess player who was world chess champion from 1921 to 1927. A chess prodigy, he is considered by many one of the greatest players of all time, widely renowned for his exceptional endgame skill and speed of play. Brief History Alexander Alekhine José Raúl Capablanca y Graupera
  • 14. Chess Origins • 1927 – First official Chess Olympiad in London • 1927 – Alexander Alekhine defeats Capablanca at Buenos Aires with +6 −3 =25 and became the fourth official world champion • José Raúl Capablanca y Graupera was a Cuban chess player who was world chess champion from 1921 to 1927. A chess prodigy, he is considered by many one of the greatest players of all time, widely renowned for his exceptional endgame skill and speed of play. Brief History Alexander Alekhine José Raúl Capablanca y Graupera
  • 17. Benefits from Playing Chess 1. Chess increases the mathematical and scientific skills of the students. It also enhances the problem solving skills, concentration ability, as well as logical thinking ability of the students 2 It develops a sense of confidence and self-worth of a student. 3 It also increases communication skills of a student.
  • 18. Benefits from Playing Chess 4. It gives a lesson of hard work and commitment. 5. Aside from intellectual exercise, chess provides entertainment and relaxation. This game is free and can provide entertainment even for the observers. .
  • 19. Benefits from Playing Chess 6.Chess also has health benefits. It is considered as a form of recreational therapy. Chess keeps the mind healthy and a healthy mind results in a healthy body. It is used by therapists to help people suffering from cognitive functioning such as anxiety and depression. 7. Chess as a form of indoor activity and strengthen family relationship. Members of the family can play with each other while at home. In a way, the chess pieces represent the family members. Each member of the family has a role to play just like in chess where each piece has specific functions to perform to win the game.
  • 20. Chess game goal • The ultimate aim in the chess game is delivering a checkmate – trapping your opponent´s king. The term checkmate is an alteration of the Persian phrase “Shah Mat”, meaning literally, “the King is ambushed”, and not “the King is dead”, that is a common misconception.
  • 21. General Chess Rules • White is always first to move and players take turns alternately moving one piece at a time. Movement is required. If a player´s turn is to move, he is not in check but has no legal moves, this situation is called “Stalemate” and it ends the game in a draw. • Each type of piece has its own method of movement. A piece may be moved to another position or may capture an opponent´s piece, replacing on its square (en passant being the only exception). With the exception of the knight, a piece may not move over or through any of the other pieces. • Each type of piece has its own method of movement. A piece may be moved to another position or may capture an opponent´s piece, replacing on its square (en passant being the only exception). With the exception of the knight, a piece may not move over or through any of the other pieces.
  • 22. General Chess Rules • When a king is threatened with capture (but can protect himself or escape), it´s called check. If a king is in check, then the player must make a move that eliminates the threat of capture and cannot leave the king in check. • Checkmate happens when a king is placed in check and there is no legal move to escape. Checkmate ends the game and the side whose king was checkmated looses.
  • 23. Here are the steps you need to follow in order to set up a chess board correctly: Step 1: Make sure the board is in the correct position. The chessboard is made up of eight rows and eight columns for a total of 64 squares of alternating colors.
  • 24. Step 2: The Rooks go in the corners.
  • 25. Step 3: The Knights should always go next to the rooks.
  • 26. Step 4: The Bishops go next to the knights.
  • 27. Step 5: The Queen always goes to a square of her own color.
  • 28. Step 6: The King goes on the last square remaining.
  • 29. Step 7: Place all the eight pawns on the second and seventh ranks in front of all the other pieces. There are eight pawns of each color in a chess set.
  • 30. CHESS PIECES AND HOW THEY MOVE Pawn Chess Piece Moves • Pawn chess pieces can only directly forward one square, with two exceptions. • Pawns can move directly forward two squares on their first move only. • Pawns can move diagonally forward when capturing an opponent's chess piece. • Once a pawn chess piece reaches the other side of the chess board, the player may "trade" the pawn in for any other chess piece if they choose, except another king.
  • 31. Rook Chess Piece Moves • Rook can move any number of vacant squares vertically or horizontally. It also is moved while castling.
  • 32. Knight Knight can move one square along any rank or file and then at an angle. The knight´s movement can also be viewed as an “L” or “7″ laid out at any horizontal or vertical angle.
  • 33. Bishop • Bishop can move any number of vacant squares in any diagonal direction.
  • 34. Queen Chess Piece Moves Queen can move any number of vacant squares diagonally, horizontally, or vertically. • cannot "jump" over any piece on the board, so its movements are restricted to any direction of unoccupied squares. • can be used to capture any of your opponent's pieces on the board.
  • 35. King King can move exactly one square horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. At most once in every game, each king is allowed to make a special move, known as castling.
  • 36. How to do "en passant" in Chess The last rule about pawns is called “en passant,” which is French for “in passing”. If a pawn moves out two squares on its first move, and by doing so lands to the side of an opponent's pawn (effectively jumping past the other pawn's ability to capture it), that other pawn has the option of capturing the first pawn as it passes by.
  • 37. How to Castle in Chess In order to castle, the following conditions must be met: • it must be that king's very first move • it must be that rook's very first move • there cannot be any pieces between the king and rook to move • the king may not be in check or pass through check
  • 38. Pawn promotion • If a pawn reaches the opponent´s edge of the table, it will be promoted – the pawn may be converted to a queen, rook, bishop or knight, as the player desires. The choice is not limited to previously captured pieces.
  • 39. CHECKMATE AND WHEN TO RESIGN • Checkmate is when one player’s King is threatened and there is no legal move to meet the threat • The player giving checkmate wins the game • A player can resign when their position is hopeless. It is a loss, but it saves time and shows they knew they lost.
  • 40. The purpose of the game is to checkmate the opponent's king. This happens when the king is put into check and cannot get out of check. There are only three ways a king can get out of check: • move out of the way (though he cannot castle!) • block the check with another piece or • capture the piece threatening the king. EXAMPLE:
  • 41. DIFFERENT WAYS TO DRAW THE GAME • By agreement with your opponent • Repeating the same position three (3) times, with the same person to move and the same possible moves • Statements: The player to move has no legal movies and is not in check • The 50-Move Rule: 50 moves without a check or piece being captured
  • 42. ABOUT DRAWS To request a draw: • You must be the player to move • You must be the player to move • Make your move • Offer a draw before touching the check. The offer is considered on your time, not your opponent’s time. • If your opponent offers a draw, he often thinks he is losing. Check what winning chances you have.
  • 44. 1. Name each chess piece. 2. Set up the chess board 3. Demonstrate castling and en passant capture. 4. Demonstrate how each chess piece moves. 5. Explain the four rules in castling. 6. Demonstrate on a chess board four ways A chess game can end in a draw
  • 45. Chess.com., History of Chess Retrieved from: https://www.chess.com/article/view/history-of-chess April 18, 2020 The chess world, Chess History Timeline retrieved from:https://thechessworld.com/articles/general-information/chess-history-timeline- 6th-century- 2012/ April 18, 2020 I chess.net, Learn How to Set up a Chess Board with Our Step-By-Step Guide retrieved from: https://www.ichess.net/blog/how-to-set-up-a-chessboard/ April 18, 2020 Wholesale Chess, CHESS PIECES AND HOW THEY MOVE retrieved from: https://www.wholesalechess.com/pages/new-to-chess/pieces.html April 18, 2020 References:
  • 46. By: Lolita M. Reynolds, LPT, MAED-GC